Raiders

2016 All-Star Teacher finalist Scott Krijnen

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2016 All-Star Teacher finalist Scott Krijnen

Scott Krijnen
Orchestra
San Jose's Castillero Middle School

Scott Krijnen has taught orchestra at Castillero and Redwood Middle School for the past 11 years. Taking over two programs in 2005 with a total of 80 students, he currently works with over 550 musicians per day through nine classes, six at Castillero and three at Redwood as an after school program.

Over the past decade, Scott has had the good fortune to continue his craft as a cellist, conductor and teacher. He has soloed throughout the Bay Area, most recently with the Winchester Symphony and Silicon Valley Philharmonic. He is the conductor of the Cambrian Symphony and the orchestras at San Jose State University’s “Summer in the City,” and has also been a guest conductor with Saratoga High School and the Palo Alto Chamber Orchestra. But most importantly, he continues his growth in the art of teaching and working with the citizens of tomorrow. Thanks to Dr. Cohen, Dr. Hollinger and many of the staff and faculty of San Jose State, Castillero has become a lab for young music educators to observe and work on their craft.

Mr. Krijnen believes that all students should have free and equal access to educational opportunities and has worked tirelessly with the community to help raise over $100,000 over the past 11 years to provide free instruments to every student who joins the orchestra programat Castillero. Because of such incredible community effort, Scott has been able to lead public school programs in which every student is able to attend every trip, every tour and every festival regardless of income or socioeconomic status. Under his leadership, the orchestras have garnered a widespread reputation for having students who are engaged, grateful and excited to learn. His students take pride in living by their motto, “It’s always your choice…..choose to be great."

Because of this spirit of learning, a vast array of guests visit and participate in the sharing of knowledge. His collaborations with Bay Area professionals, nationally acclaimed artists and institutions of higher learning have brought hundreds of guests into his classroom to observe, participate, lead, share or to perform. Guests include: Cypress String Quartet, Amaranth String Quartet, Sphinx Virtuosi, Philharmonia Baroque, Chamber Music By The Bay with Mr. Shiozaki, Mr. Hsu, Ms. Chang and Ms. Gaynon, Mr. Temkin, Professor DiGiacinto, Dr. Kim, Dr. Lin, Mr. Bensing, Professor McCullough, Ms. Clymer, Mr. Hoffer, Ms. Li, Dr. Laycock, Dr. Smith, Mr. Nakagoshi, Ms. Jan, Mr. Simon, Mr. Boitz, Ms. Makhijani, , Mr. Tagawa and more.

Scott is a Presser Scholar from the University of Idaho and earned his Masters in Cello Performance from the San Francisco Conservatory of Music receiving the Chamber Music Award. He has toured Korea and Taiwan as part of the KAS Piano Trio and has performed and played with dozens of orchestras and chamber ensembles. In 2011, he was awarded Teacher of the Year at Castillero and in 2016, he has been named the Richard L. Levin Orchestra Educator of the year for the state of California.

Every day is a chance to be great and Scott gets to witness that each day with his incredible students, parents, colleagues and community. He is truly grateful for getting to share his love and joy for the arts with his students but more importantly, for helping students realize that they are the reason for their success.

Raiders make good use of trade bounty, add dynamic WR Martavis Bryant

Raiders make good use of trade bounty, add dynamic WR Martavis Bryant

ALAMEDA – Raiders general manager Reggie McKenzie said the NFL draft’s No. 10 overall pick was popular on Thursday night. He was fielding calls from teams who wanted it to help the Silver and Black move up or down.

“It seemed like our pick was pretty favorable,” McKenzie said. “After sorting it through, we just went ahead and pulled the trigger.”

McKenzie and head coach Jon Gruden executed a trade with Arizona, giving the Cardinals No. 10 for Nos. 15, 79 and 152.

That’s not a king’s ransom, even for five spots, considering Arizona used the pick to draft UCLA quarterback Josh Rosen.

The Raiders made quick use of two picks. They drafted offensive tackle Kolton Miller at No. 15, and traded No. 79 to Pittsburgh for receiver Martavis Bryant.

“Martavis was all about being able to use that (extra) pick and get another player,” McKenzie said. “We feel like we’ve drafted Martavis Bryant.”

There are some obvious differences. The Raiders get a proven commodity over a college player. They get a 27-year old entering a contract year over someone under control for four years.

Bryant automatically upgrades the receiver corps, and should be the No. 3 option behind Amari Cooper and Jordy Nelson. It’s also bad news for Seth Roberts, the team’s third receiver in recent seasons. Cooper and Nelson can play his spot in the slot, and he might end up with fewer opportunities in 2019.

Bryant brings something different to the mix. He’s a speed demon who can produce while stretching a defense.

He averages 15.2 yards per receptions, and 31 catches of 20 yards or more in three seasons played. Bryant should have four years under his belt, but missed 2016 while suspended as a repeat offender of the NFL’s substance abuse program.

Bryant was reinstated in April 2017, and turned in a lackluster year with 50 catches for 603 yards and three touchdowns. He was the subject of offseason trade rumors, and ended up with the Raiders on draft day.

The Raiders were comfortable taking him despite 20 games missed over multiple suspensions, confident he can help this offense.

“When we talk about character, we’re not going to condemn them. We’re not going to nail them for life, so to speak,” McKenzie said. “If we see some semblance of whether it’s remorse or whether it’s getting on the right path. … We feel good about giving Martavis an opportunity. We think with our resources, we could help him.”

Bryant’s set to make $1.97 million in 2018. That puts the Raiders over the salary cap, per the NFLPA numbers. They would’ve made moves to help pay the rookies and create roster spots, but they’ll have to get creative financially to work everyone into the financial threshold.

Why the Raiders made decision to take Kolton Miller at No. 15

Why the Raiders made decision to take Kolton Miller at No. 15

ALAMEDA – The Raiders entered the NFL draft's opening round with a couple defensive players in mind. 

They were known to like North Carolina State edge rusher Bradley Chubb, as the Athletic first reported, and Georgia linebacker Roquan Smith. They couldn't secure either elite prospect on Thursday evening. Denver took Chubb at No. 5. Chicago snagged Smith at No. 8. That was no surprise.

Then the Raiders shifted focus solely on the offensive line.  

They honed in on Notre Dame’s Mike McGlinchey, universally considered the best offensive tackle in this draft. The 49ers snagged him at No. 9, a selection won with a tiebreaking coin flip against the Raiders.

The Raiders didn’t use their No. 10 pick. They regrouped quickly and traded back with Arizona, taking the Nos. 15, 79 and 152 selections for the drop.

Florida State safety Derwin James and Virginia Tech linebacker Tremaine Edmunds were still available at No. 15. The Raiders liked them both, but were undeterred in their quest to improve the tackle spot.

The Raiders took UCLA’s Kolton Miller at No. 15, the next tackle on their draft board.

The pick was met with some skepticism from the fan base, which considered him unworthy of the draft slot. That was especially true with top defenders available who play sexier positions. Leaving James on the board, in particular, was a point of contention for many.

The Raiders stuck with a guy NFL Network said they would’ve taken at No. 10. They got a couple extra picks – one quickly turned into Pittsburgh receiver Martavis Bryant – and shored up an area of weakness.

The Raiders have unheralded veteran Breno Giacomini and a mix of developmental prospects at right tackle. Miller will compete to start there this season, with a long-term plan of moving to left tackle when 35-year old Donald Penn’s contract ends after 2019 at the latest. The three-time Pro Bowler is still recovering from foot surgery, though a full recovery’s in the cards. Penn will make roughly $8 million in 2018 with a $10.3 million sum due the next year, though his 2019 money isn’t guaranteed.

Miller will cost far less than that. Having someone on a rookie deal playing a premium position – left tackles often get eight-figure salaries – will help the Raiders survive paying massive sums to Derek Carr, Khalil Mack and several star members of the offensive line.

Those plans are contingent on one key thing: Miller’s development. He has the physical tools to be an excellent NFL blocker, but must improve in some areas to reach full potential.

“He’s a big man that can move his feet,” Raiders general manager Reggie McKenzie said. “He’s played left tackle and right tackle. He’s been an offensive lineman pretty much his whole life. He understands the game. He’s an excellent athlete who has great potential, so we feel really good about adding him to the Raider roster.”

Miller was a second choice behind McGlinchey, but he still solves an issue on this offense. The right tackle has been a mess for years. Head coach Jon Gruden, this team’s primary shot caller, understood that. The Raiders have plenty of developmental linemen. They needed to use a premium pick in an effort to satisfy present and future needs.

While one source said there was some debate over Miller within the organization, offensive line coach Tom Cable is happy about this pick. He was a big Miller fan, and McKenzie said he played a big role in making this pick.

His 2017 game tape wasn’t great, but he tested well at the NFL combine. Miller’s known as a hard worker focused on shoring up individual weaknesses, vital to someone who needs to develop.

“When you talk about pass protection and staying in front of his guy, that’s what he does,” McKenzie said. “I mean he’s got the length, he’s got the great feet and when you’re talking about playing at the second level, pulling. I mean, this guy has a lot of talent and we think if we can get him on scheme and get (Cable) working with him, he’s going to flourish.”