49ers

49ers announce signing of ex-Giant Jacobs

725694.jpg

49ers announce signing of ex-Giant Jacobs

Bruising running back Brandon Jacobs, released by the New York Giants last month, was formally signed by the 49ers on Friday.

Jacobs reportedly agreed to a one-year deal for a maximum of more than 2 million if he tops out his incentives. The 49ers did not release terms of the deal.

Jacobs (6-foot-4, 264 pounds) is a seven-year veteran who had 571 yards (3.8-yard average) and seven touchdowns last season as the Giants' No. 2 running back behind Ahmad Bradshaw in the regular season.

Brandon Jacobs Q&A
Are you going to be out here for good, to start the conditioning program on Monday?
I'm on my way back to Jersey tonight and I'll be back here next Sunday.

What attracted you to the 49ers?
The 49ers are a great organization, I've played against the Niners year in and year out and it's always a great challenge. (They're) a good football team, great ownership, a team that is on its way to a championship, really -- a good football team, and really close, and I felt wanted. I felt like they really wanted me around and I was excited about it.

What are your memories of NFC title game and the regular season?
The defense, the stinginess of the defense. Thy were the best defense we played all year long. both games, they didn't give up anything. It was two great games, but that's last yaer. I'm a part of this team now. The Giants, I was there for seven years but this year's the only one that mattered to me.

How did the 49ers make you feel wanted?
Speaking to (GM) Trent (Baalke) about everything made me feel wanted. When we spoke, (we talked about) as much as I can bring to the team, leadership on the higher stage. I felt like they really wanted me around and that made me feel really good, and now I'm here.
Have you talked to Frank Gore?
I haven't spoke to Frank yet. I'm looking forward to speaking with Frank here sometime this week. But I haven't spoke to him yet.

Do you anticipate competing with him in training camp?
Well, I think all of that is going to work itself out but I think as far as competing, I think that makes every one of else better. That's all that competing does -- it makes us better as a team, it makes us better at our jobs. I'm looking forward to the opportunity to be able to play with Frank.

If it's 3rd-and goal on the 1-yard-line, are you getting the ball or is Frank?
Well, being about 25 to 30 pounds heavier than Frank, I would hope I would be the one to get it. But Frank has done great in that area the last seven years -- me and Frank actually came in the league the same year. He has done great. He has no issues getting there so it's whatever is best for the team, and it's a call that coach (Jim) Harbaugh makes.

Have they told you anything about your role?
You know, my role is going to come off of how much I earn. I am going to earn everything that I get and that's all to be said for that. You're not supposed to tell someone what they're going to do because it's a funny game -- things can work out for you one time and not the next time. I'm going to get as much as I earn.

49ers press release
The 49ers are pleased to add a player with Brandons wealth of experience and talent, said 49ers General Manager Trent Baalke. He has been productive throughout his career, and provides our offense a different dimension. We look forward to incorporating Brandon into our system.

Jacobs (6-4, 264) was originally selected in the fourth round (110th overall) of the 2005 NFL Draft by the New York Giants. The seven-year veteran has played in 100 games (48 starts) for the Giants, rushing for 4,849 yards, and a franchise-record 56 touchdowns, on 1,078 carries. Jacobs also recorded 80 receptions for 730 yards and four touchdowns. In 2011, he played in 14 games (six starts) and tallied 571 yards rushing and seven touchdowns on 152 carries, while adding 15 receptions for 128 yards and one touchdown.

A two-time Super Bowl champion, Jacobs has played in 11 postseason games (five starts), and has rushed for 461 yards and four touchdowns on 120 carries, while adding eight receptions for 45 yards and one touchdown.

In 2008, Jacobs rushed for a career-high 1,089 yards (despite missing three games with a knee injury), while fellow Giants RB Derrick Ward ran for 1,025 yards. They became the fourth pair of running backs from the same team and the fifth set of teammates to rush for at least 1,000 yards in the same season.

A 29-year old native of Napoleonville, LA, Jacobs played at three colleges: Coffeyville (Kan.) Community College, Auburn and Southern Illinois. In 42 games at the three stops, he rushed for 4,003 yards with 52 touchdowns on 595 carries (6.7-yard avg.), caught 12 passes for 136 yards (11.3-yard avg.) and returned 6 kickoffs for 140 yards (23.3-yard avg.).

Hoyer understands 49ers' move to Beathard, plans to stay ready just in case

Hoyer understands 49ers' move to Beathard, plans to stay ready just in case

The move to rookie C.J. Beathard as the 49ers’ starting quarterback is intended to be for the remainder of the season. But Brian Hoyer knows things can always change.

Hoyer, who played ineffectively after winning the starting job in the offseason, was benched on Sunday in the second quarter against Washington. The winless 49ers are Hoyer’s seventh team in nine NFL seasons, so he is familiar with rejection.

“I’ve been in this situation before and C.J. is a great kid, so I’ll be there every day trying to help him as much as I can,” Hoyer said.

“Also, the other thing is, you never know what’s going to happen – injuries and stuff like that. Obviously, you never wish that upon people but that’s what happened to me in Houston and I was right back in a few weeks later. So you’ve always got to stay ready and just be ready to do your job.”

Hoyer started for the Texans in Week 1 of 2015. Ryan Mallett took over in Week 2, but Hoyer returned to the starting lineup in Week 6.

Coach Kyle Shanahan decided to go with Beathard after Hoyer completed just four of his 11 pass attempts for 34 yards in four offensive possessions. The 49ers managed just two first downs (one by penalty) and 39 yards with Hoyer in the game.

“I can understand what Kyle did,” Hoyer said. “He tried to change some things up. I thought C.J. came in and gave those guys some life a little bit.

“It’s part of the job and, unfortunately, when you don’t play as well as you like, and your offense doesn’t play as well as you like, he’s forced to make that decision. I have the utmost respect for Kyle and I knew he was firm on his decision and I just went about trying to support C.J. as best I could.”

Beathard completed 19 of 36 passes for 245 yards with one touchdown – a 45-yard strike to Aldrick Robinson – and one interception on a desperation fourth-down attempt on the 49ers’ final offensive play of the game.

Beathard said he felt a lot of support from all of his teammates during the 49ers’ 26-24. The 49ers rallied from a 17-point deficit to tie the game in the third quarter.

“It was awesome,” said Beathard, a third-round draft pick from Iowa. “I think this team showed a lot of fight and battled hard until the end. But (we) just couldn’t get the job done. We are going to come back and get back to work on Monday and Tuesday. We have another one this week (at Levi’s Stadium against the Dallas Cowboys), so hopefully we can get a win.”

To prove collusion, Colin Kaepernick better be able to provide the smoking gun

kap-ap.jpg
AP

To prove collusion, Colin Kaepernick better be able to provide the smoking gun

The only thing you need to understand about Colin Kaepernick’s action against the NFL is this.

If he has paperwork proving that the owners conspired to keep him out of football, he wins. If he doesn’t, he almost certainly loses.

Oh, there’s a lot of gobbled-lawyerese in any court proceeding; that’s why lawyers lawyer.

But the fact is this: Kaepernick and/or his lawyers have to produce the smoking gun, as Marvin Miller did in the ‘80s collusion cases against Major League Baseball, In those, the owners conspired not to sign free agents, did so in writing, and got their hats blocked in court.

Then they did it again, and lost again. And then, clever fellows that they were, they did it a third time, and got caught once more.

Lesson learned: From that moment, collusion became a paperless enterprise. No smoke, no gun. No gun, no case. It couldn’t have been simpler.

Now you may try to apply logic like, “Brandon Weeden,” or “Brett Hundley,” or “the owners are . . .” And you may well be correct. In fact, you almost certainly are.

But being correct isn’t the same as proving it, and without proof, Kaepernick’s case is an excellent example of well-constructed circumstantial evidence that will amount to little. The bar for this is high, and like everything else in life, it requires receipts.

Therein lies Kaepernick’s problem. Unless, of course, he has the receipts – statements on tape, or written memoranda, or rogue texts. In that case, therein lies, the league’s problem.

It is hard to imagine that the 32 owners, with all the lawyers at their command, would be so stupid as to leave collectable evidence laying about, but that’s what people assumed in the ‘80s, too, and baseball had to pay $280 million for its carelessness.

Still, that isn’t way to bet. Barry Bonds filed a lawsuit along similar grounds when he couldn’t get work after being released by the Giants in 2007, and had no corroboration for what he suspected was a blackball against him for, well, for being Barry Bonds. So he lost.

And I suspect that is what we have here as well. Kaepernick’s suit risks nothing for him, as his NFL days are almost certainly over anyway, so he may as well have his day in court if not the field.

But if he has the goods and can present them coherently before a judge, we’ve got an entirely different game, and one more reminder that we are in bloodsport territory between owners and players now, and there are no rules.

Except that one about paperwork. That one never changes.