49ers

49ers fans' clamor for Kaepernick unfounded, expected

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49ers fans' clamor for Kaepernick unfounded, expected

The 49ers have built over the decades a fan base that regards bitching about its starting quarterback its inherent right, maybe even a constitutional one.

Thus it is delectably stupid that after one of Alex Smiths best games that the matter of Colin Kaepernick getting no snaps is suddenly an issue again.

RELATED: Smith 'gobbles' up play time, Kaepernick sidelined

Well, not really an issue, though Jim Harbaughs State Of The Barnyard Address did draw some fire away from the real nonsense.

Of course, Kaepernicks Tuesday tweet, Bout to get this workout in because yall ain't goin keep me on this sideline forever, created much to-do about the level of his irritation over being involved in zero snaps against the Arizona Cardinals. His 48 snaps this year represent 10 percent of all offensive 49ers plays, 6.4 percent of all 49ers yardage and 6.3 percent of all 49ers points.

Bout to get this workout in because yall ain't goin keep me on this sideline forever! Colin Kaepernick (@Kaepernick7) October 30, 2012
And thats the big deal for today. Colin Kaepernick wasnt used in a game the 49ers won, 24-3, and dominated from start to finish. Hopeless.

RECAP: 49ers 24, Cardinals 3

And yet entirely predictable. Other than those few happy years when Joe Montana was free of the shadow of Steve Young (1980-1986), the backup quarterback has always been the most exalted position in the teams history. And during the years when Smith was surrounded by poor performances, poor coaches, poor teammates and rich veins of inexperience, the backup quarterback was particularly beloved.

And here is whom the fan base spent its very temporary love on: Tim Rattay. Ken Dorsey. Cody Pickett. Trent Dilfer. Shaun Hill. Chris Weinke. J.T. OSullivan. Troy Smith. David Carr. Of that group, Dilfer has had the best ersatz post-49er quarterbacking career, as he plays regular downs on the studio field.

But lets stay with Kaepernick for a moment, and ask the musical question: While we get why he wants to play, we are utterly gobsmacked as to why theres such a mad demand from others for his increased appearances, for the following compelling reasons:

1. Smith is 20-6 in his last 26 games.
2. Smith runs the offense given him by Harbaugh, and if it gobbles, it gobbles quite efficiently.
3. A quarterback does not operate in a vacuum. The players around him matter, too.
4. Harbaugh, whom most 49er fans will agree has done quite well when he wasnt actually saying words or dealing with non-49er employees, has had choices to make and opportunities to make them, and he has chosen Smith.
5. If fantasy league performances define quarterbacks, then you should demand that the 49ers take Denvers 4-3 record instead of their 6-2, or better yet, Washingtons 3-5.
6. And finally, teams adjust all the time, and they clearly have adjusted to Kaepernick for the moment.

Against all this, there is the counter-argument.

1. Alex Smith is Alex Smith, and he always will be.
2. Hey, this is San Francisco. If you wanted people to like you, you shouldnt have won the job to begin with.

This, of course, is utterly daft. It is also a law of physics in this mad-as-a-brush town. This is who they are. This is what they do. And no amount of counseling will change that. They will always and forever say, Sure the local team won 24-3, and it has the third-best record in football, and it almost got to the Super Bowl last year after years of stinking out the stadium, the town, the state and the entire galactic quadrant, but what if it had Drew Brees?

Well, you dont. This is who you have, and hes done very well by all of you for the last year and a half.

So yes, the fans should worry about the backups involvement, and yes, they should agitate for regime change, and yes, they should always maintain that the quarterback acts alone. Its in your DNA (even though it isnt), or its been passed down to you from your father (even though he was wrong about 70 other things), or its tradition (and so was the theories about the flat earth or the ozone layer being as sturdy as ever).

It is their right. Even when its so preposterously wrong.

Ray Ratto is a columnist for CSNBayArea.com

Hoyer understands 49ers' move to Beathard, plans to stay ready just in case

Hoyer understands 49ers' move to Beathard, plans to stay ready just in case

The move to rookie C.J. Beathard as the 49ers’ starting quarterback is intended to be for the remainder of the season. But Brian Hoyer knows things can always change.

Hoyer, who played ineffectively after winning the starting job in the offseason, was benched on Sunday in the second quarter against Washington. The winless 49ers are Hoyer’s seventh team in nine NFL seasons, so he is familiar with rejection.

“I’ve been in this situation before and C.J. is a great kid, so I’ll be there every day trying to help him as much as I can,” Hoyer said.

“Also, the other thing is, you never know what’s going to happen – injuries and stuff like that. Obviously, you never wish that upon people but that’s what happened to me in Houston and I was right back in a few weeks later. So you’ve always got to stay ready and just be ready to do your job.”

Hoyer started for the Texans in Week 1 of 2015. Ryan Mallett took over in Week 2, but Hoyer returned to the starting lineup in Week 6.

Coach Kyle Shanahan decided to go with Beathard after Hoyer completed just four of his 11 pass attempts for 34 yards in four offensive possessions. The 49ers managed just two first downs (one by penalty) and 39 yards with Hoyer in the game.

“I can understand what Kyle did,” Hoyer said. “He tried to change some things up. I thought C.J. came in and gave those guys some life a little bit.

“It’s part of the job and, unfortunately, when you don’t play as well as you like, and your offense doesn’t play as well as you like, he’s forced to make that decision. I have the utmost respect for Kyle and I knew he was firm on his decision and I just went about trying to support C.J. as best I could.”

Beathard completed 19 of 36 passes for 245 yards with one touchdown – a 45-yard strike to Aldrick Robinson – and one interception on a desperation fourth-down attempt on the 49ers’ final offensive play of the game.

Beathard said he felt a lot of support from all of his teammates during the 49ers’ 26-24. The 49ers rallied from a 17-point deficit to tie the game in the third quarter.

“It was awesome,” said Beathard, a third-round draft pick from Iowa. “I think this team showed a lot of fight and battled hard until the end. But (we) just couldn’t get the job done. We are going to come back and get back to work on Monday and Tuesday. We have another one this week (at Levi’s Stadium against the Dallas Cowboys), so hopefully we can get a win.”

To prove collusion, Colin Kaepernick better be able to provide the smoking gun

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AP

To prove collusion, Colin Kaepernick better be able to provide the smoking gun

The only thing you need to understand about Colin Kaepernick’s action against the NFL is this.

If he has paperwork proving that the owners conspired to keep him out of football, he wins. If he doesn’t, he almost certainly loses.

Oh, there’s a lot of gobbled-lawyerese in any court proceeding; that’s why lawyers lawyer.

But the fact is this: Kaepernick and/or his lawyers have to produce the smoking gun, as Marvin Miller did in the ‘80s collusion cases against Major League Baseball, In those, the owners conspired not to sign free agents, did so in writing, and got their hats blocked in court.

Then they did it again, and lost again. And then, clever fellows that they were, they did it a third time, and got caught once more.

Lesson learned: From that moment, collusion became a paperless enterprise. No smoke, no gun. No gun, no case. It couldn’t have been simpler.

Now you may try to apply logic like, “Brandon Weeden,” or “Brett Hundley,” or “the owners are . . .” And you may well be correct. In fact, you almost certainly are.

But being correct isn’t the same as proving it, and without proof, Kaepernick’s case is an excellent example of well-constructed circumstantial evidence that will amount to little. The bar for this is high, and like everything else in life, it requires receipts.

Therein lies Kaepernick’s problem. Unless, of course, he has the receipts – statements on tape, or written memoranda, or rogue texts. In that case, therein lies, the league’s problem.

It is hard to imagine that the 32 owners, with all the lawyers at their command, would be so stupid as to leave collectable evidence laying about, but that’s what people assumed in the ‘80s, too, and baseball had to pay $280 million for its carelessness.

Still, that isn’t way to bet. Barry Bonds filed a lawsuit along similar grounds when he couldn’t get work after being released by the Giants in 2007, and had no corroboration for what he suspected was a blackball against him for, well, for being Barry Bonds. So he lost.

And I suspect that is what we have here as well. Kaepernick’s suit risks nothing for him, as his NFL days are almost certainly over anyway, so he may as well have his day in court if not the field.

But if he has the goods and can present them coherently before a judge, we’ve got an entirely different game, and one more reminder that we are in bloodsport territory between owners and players now, and there are no rules.

Except that one about paperwork. That one never changes.