49ers

The all-time 49ers-only Top 10 list

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The all-time 49ers-only Top 10 list

The question came in via Twitter last week around the time the Hall of Fame voting was the topic of conversation among 49ers fans:Who do you think is the best player to ever play his whole career in a 49er uniform? (@Kevnkate)It's a great topic. And it's one that, obviously, precludes the great 49ers who played for other franchises, such as Joe Montana (Chiefs), Jerry Rice (Raiders, Seahawks), Ronnie Lott (Raiders, Jets), Steve Young (Buccaneers), Roger Craig (Raiders, Vikings), Joe "The Jet" Perry (Colts), Hugh McElhenny (Vikings, Giants, Lions) and Y.A. Tittle (Giants).
It's impossible to compare players from different eras because the game has changed so much. But in cobbling together the list, particular weight is given to ex-49ers enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Current players were not considered.So here is my highly debatable ranking of the top 49ers to play their entire careers with the 49ers:Who is in your 49ers-Only Top 10?
1. DT Leo Nomellini: He was the 49ers' first draft choice after joining the NFL, and he played every game for 14 seasons. He earned 10 trips to the Pro Bowl, and was a six-time first-team All-Pro -- two years on offense and four years on defense. He was a first-ballot Pro Football Hall of Famer, inducted in 1969.2. CB Jimmy Johnson: Recognized as one of the best man coverage corners of his time, opposing quarterbacks were reluctant to throw his way. Still, he recorded 47 interceptions in his career. He was named All-Pro four consecutive seasons from 1969 through 1972. He played in three Pro Bowls and missed two others because of injuries. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1994.3. T Bob St. Clair: The San Francisco native was named first- or second-team All-NFL nine times in his career and was selected to play in five Pro Bowls. He had uncommon size and speed during the time in which he played. And, yes, it's true that he still eats raw meat. In 1956, he blocked 10 field goals, and once lost five teeth while blocking a punt. Injuries cut short his career. He played 11 seasons, ending in 1963. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1990.4. LB Dave Wilcox: Twenty-six years after his career concluded, Wilcox was elected into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2000 through the Seniors Committee. Nicknamed "The Intimidator" because of his fierce style of play, Wilcox was named to the All-NFL first- or second-team eight times in his career. He chosen to play in seven Pro Bowls.5. DT Bryant Young: The first word that jumps to mind when thinking about Young is "class." He played 14 seasons for the 49ers, and always acted in a truly professional manner through the good and the bad seasons. He started every game he appeared throughout his career, beginning with the Super Bowl-winning year of 1994. Next year, he'll join a class of first-time eligible Hall of Famers that includes Larry Allen, Jonathan Ogden, Warren Sapp and Michael Strahan. It'll be difficult. He was selected to four Pro Bowls and was a first-team All-Pro once in his career. Since 1982, when it became an official NFL statistic, Young leads the 49ers with 89.5 sacks. He is currently defensive line coach at the University of Florida. 6. WR Dwight Clark: He did a lot more than come down with "The Catch." He had five consecutive seasons from 1980 to '84 with 840 or more yards receiving. That streak ended in 1985, a season in which he caught a career-high 10 touchdown passes.7. TE Brent Jones: He was selected to the Pro Bowl four times in his 11-year career and was a staple of the league's best offense from the late 1980s through most of the 1990s. The Pittsburgh Steelers selected him in the fifth round of the 1986 draft, but he only played regular-season games with the 49ers.8. WR John Taylor: He twice eclipsed 1,000 yards receiving and he was named to two Pro Bowl teams despite playing his career in Jerry Rice's shadow. Of course, he had one of the big catches in team history with a 10-yard reception from Joe Montana in the closing minute to win Super Bowl XXIII against the Cincinnati Bengals.9. GC Randy Cross: He started 180 games for the 49ers at center and guard from 1976 through 1988. He was named to the Pro Bowl three times in his career, and excelled on three Super Bowl lines.10. QB John Brodie: His stats do not translate very well to today's game, in which there's a premium on completion percentage, touchdowninterception margin and passer rating. But for longevity, Brodie can't be topped. He entered the league with the 49ers in 1957 and he was with the team through the 1973 season. His 17 seasons with the 49ers is a club record.Honorable mention
T Harris Barton (1987-96)
DT Michael Carter (1984-92)
PK Tommy Davis (1959-69)
T Keith Fahnhorst (1974-87)
C Bill Johnson (1948-56)
DT Charlie Krueger (1959-73)
LB Frank Nunley (1967-76)
C Fred Quillan (1978-87)
T Len Rohde (1960-74)
G Jesse Sapolu (1983-97)
WRK Gordy Soltau (1950-58)
CB Bruce Taylor (1970-77)
LB Keena Turner (1980-90)
WR Billy Wilson (1951-60)
CB Eric Wright (1981-90)

What they're saying: Happy Thanksgiving 2017

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Twitter/@49ers

What they're saying: Happy Thanksgiving 2017

Bay Area sports teams and your favorite players have plenty to be thankful for this year. 

Check out how the teams and players are celebrating Thanksgiving in 2017.

Shanahan: Garoppolo's best football will come next season

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USATSI

Shanahan: Garoppolo's best football will come next season

SANTA CLARA – The two quarterbacks who finish this season with the 49ers are probably going to be the same two quarterbacks the organization carry on their 2018 roster.

So every decision coach Kyle Shanahan makes with C.J. Beathard and Jimmy Garoppolo is being made to consider what is best for those two players.

Shanahan made the expected announcement this week that Beathard will make his fifth consecutive start on Sunday when the 49ers face the Seattle Seahawks at Levi’s Stadium.

Beathard is coming off his best game as a pro. He was a major contributor to the 49ers’ first victory of the season, throwing for 288 yards, throwing two touchdowns and rushing for a score in a 31-21 victory over the New York Giants. His performance seemingly did enough to earn him another start.

Meanwhile, Garoppolo pulled up to 49ers headquarters on Oct. 31 with no prior knowledge of Shanahan’s offensive system. Even as a rookie, Beathard has five more months of experience in the 49ers’ offense than Garoppolo, a four-year professional who made just two starts during his time with the New England Patriots.

“We’ve had C.J. in there for some time,” Shanahan said. “He’s getting more used to it, and I’m getting more used to him. The players are getting more used to him around him. It’s been nice to add a few things each week for him.”

General manager John Lynch reiterated this week he considers Garoppolo the 49ers’ quarterback of the future. Garoppolo is not under contract for next season. If the 49ers are unable to work out a multi-year extension, the club would be expected to designate him as their franchise player to retain him for the 2018 season.

Garoppolo is likely to get some playing time in the final six games of the season, but the 49ers have every reason to take their time in order to give him the best chance at success. On the first three days of the bye week, Garoppolo had a chance to go back to the beginning and learn the basics of the scheme in meetings with quarterbacks coach Rich Scangarello and Shanahan.

Shanahan’s scheme is complex with unique verbiage and an abundance of adjustments that are required on any given play. Atlanta quarterback Matt Ryan took a step backward in his first season in Shanahan's scheme. The next year, Ryan was a runaway MVP winner with a career-high 38 touchdowns and a career-low seven interceptions.

It took Ryan a full season of experience with Shanahan to fully grasp his responsibilities, so it is unreasonable to believe Garoppolo would be able to do much more than just function if he gets onto the field for extended action.

“Jimmy gets more and more ready each week,” Shanahan said. “Is Jimmy going to be the best he can? To me, that’s impossible. He just hasn’t been here long enough, and I think he’ll get an opportunity to be better each week.

“I don’t think we’re going to see Jimmy’s best football, to be fair to him, until next year because that’s what guys need. But C.J. did play his best football last week, which definitely, to me, made the decision easier.”