49ers

Two victims of Candlestick violence improving

Two victims of Candlestick violence improving

Aug. 22, 201149ERS PAGE 49ERS VIDEORAIDERS PAGE RAIDERS VIDEO

PROGRAMMING NOTE: Chronicle Live is at Raiders training camp in Napa, where the topics will include Saturday night's violence at Candlestick Park, the drafting of Terrelle Pryor, Jason Campbell's condition and more. Tune in at 5, 9 and 11 p.m on Comcast SportsNet Bay Area and 6 p.m. and midnight for Comcast SportsNet California.

CSNBayArea.com staff

Two of the three victims of Saturday night's violent fan outburst at Candlestick Park were upgraded Monday from serious to fair condition, according to San Francisco General Hospital spokesperson Rachael Kagan.

A 26-year-old male from Santa Rosa, the victim of an assault, has been upgraded to "fair." A male, 25, gunshot victim, also has been upgraded to "fair."

A third victim at the 49ers-Raiders exhibition game, a 20-year-old male who was shot in the face, sustained only a superficial wound, according to police.

RATTO: York off the mark suggesting schedule influence violence

The next update will be issued Tuesday morning. The names of the victims have not been released.

The most seriously injured shooting victim was apparently a Raiders fan. He suffered life threatening injuries after someone shot him several times apparently for wearing a shirt that had an obscenity directed at the 49ers.

No arrests have been made, but SFPD said it has detained a person of interest in one of the shootings. In the beating, police are seeking a male suspect described as a Samoan or Pacific Island man between 25 and 30 years of age, with a goatee and long curly hair tied up in a pony tail, weighing up to 260 pounds and standing almost 6-feet-5 inches tall.

Various accounts put the number of large-scale fights Saturday night at three. The two shootings and the assault did not take place in the stands. Both shootings occurred in the parking lot after the game and the assault occurred in a bathroom inside the stadium during the fourth quarter.

The attacks come four-and-a-half months after Giants fan Bryan Stow was severely beaten by two men outside Dodger Stadium, following the season opener on March 31.

Hoyer understands 49ers' move to Beathard, plans to stay ready just in case

Hoyer understands 49ers' move to Beathard, plans to stay ready just in case

The move to rookie C.J. Beathard as the 49ers’ starting quarterback is intended to be for the remainder of the season. But Brian Hoyer knows things can always change.

Hoyer, who played ineffectively after winning the starting job in the offseason, was benched on Sunday in the second quarter against Washington. The winless 49ers are Hoyer’s seventh team in nine NFL seasons, so he is familiar with rejection.

“I’ve been in this situation before and C.J. is a great kid, so I’ll be there every day trying to help him as much as I can,” Hoyer said.

“Also, the other thing is, you never know what’s going to happen – injuries and stuff like that. Obviously, you never wish that upon people but that’s what happened to me in Houston and I was right back in a few weeks later. So you’ve always got to stay ready and just be ready to do your job.”

Hoyer started for the Texans in Week 1 of 2015. Ryan Mallett took over in Week 2, but Hoyer returned to the starting lineup in Week 6.

Coach Kyle Shanahan decided to go with Beathard after Hoyer completed just four of his 11 pass attempts for 34 yards in four offensive possessions. The 49ers managed just two first downs (one by penalty) and 39 yards with Hoyer in the game.

“I can understand what Kyle did,” Hoyer said. “He tried to change some things up. I thought C.J. came in and gave those guys some life a little bit.

“It’s part of the job and, unfortunately, when you don’t play as well as you like, and your offense doesn’t play as well as you like, he’s forced to make that decision. I have the utmost respect for Kyle and I knew he was firm on his decision and I just went about trying to support C.J. as best I could.”

Beathard completed 19 of 36 passes for 245 yards with one touchdown – a 45-yard strike to Aldrick Robinson – and one interception on a desperation fourth-down attempt on the 49ers’ final offensive play of the game.

Beathard said he felt a lot of support from all of his teammates during the 49ers’ 26-24. The 49ers rallied from a 17-point deficit to tie the game in the third quarter.

“It was awesome,” said Beathard, a third-round draft pick from Iowa. “I think this team showed a lot of fight and battled hard until the end. But (we) just couldn’t get the job done. We are going to come back and get back to work on Monday and Tuesday. We have another one this week (at Levi’s Stadium against the Dallas Cowboys), so hopefully we can get a win.”

To prove collusion, Colin Kaepernick better be able to provide the smoking gun

kap-ap.jpg
AP

To prove collusion, Colin Kaepernick better be able to provide the smoking gun

The only thing you need to understand about Colin Kaepernick’s action against the NFL is this.

If he has paperwork proving that the owners conspired to keep him out of football, he wins. If he doesn’t, he almost certainly loses.

Oh, there’s a lot of gobbled-lawyerese in any court proceeding; that’s why lawyers lawyer.

But the fact is this: Kaepernick and/or his lawyers have to produce the smoking gun, as Marvin Miller did in the ‘80s collusion cases against Major League Baseball, In those, the owners conspired not to sign free agents, did so in writing, and got their hats blocked in court.

Then they did it again, and lost again. And then, clever fellows that they were, they did it a third time, and got caught once more.

Lesson learned: From that moment, collusion became a paperless enterprise. No smoke, no gun. No gun, no case. It couldn’t have been simpler.

Now you may try to apply logic like, “Brandon Weeden,” or “Brett Hundley,” or “the owners are . . .” And you may well be correct. In fact, you almost certainly are.

But being correct isn’t the same as proving it, and without proof, Kaepernick’s case is an excellent example of well-constructed circumstantial evidence that will amount to little. The bar for this is high, and like everything else in life, it requires receipts.

Therein lies Kaepernick’s problem. Unless, of course, he has the receipts – statements on tape, or written memoranda, or rogue texts. In that case, therein lies, the league’s problem.

It is hard to imagine that the 32 owners, with all the lawyers at their command, would be so stupid as to leave collectable evidence laying about, but that’s what people assumed in the ‘80s, too, and baseball had to pay $280 million for its carelessness.

Still, that isn’t way to bet. Barry Bonds filed a lawsuit along similar grounds when he couldn’t get work after being released by the Giants in 2007, and had no corroboration for what he suspected was a blackball against him for, well, for being Barry Bonds. So he lost.

And I suspect that is what we have here as well. Kaepernick’s suit risks nothing for him, as his NFL days are almost certainly over anyway, so he may as well have his day in court if not the field.

But if he has the goods and can present them coherently before a judge, we’ve got an entirely different game, and one more reminder that we are in bloodsport territory between owners and players now, and there are no rules.

Except that one about paperwork. That one never changes.