NCAA

No. 6 USC routs No. 14 Stanford for 11th straight win

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USASTI

No. 6 USC routs No. 14 Stanford for 11th straight win

LOS ANGELES  — Steven Mitchell and Deontay Burnett caught two touchdown passes apiece from Sam Darnold, and No. 6 Southern California extended its winning streak to 11 games with a bruising 42-24 victory over No. 14 Stanford on Saturday night.

Darnold went 21 of 26 with 316 yards passing for the Trojans (2-0, 1-0 Pac-12), who snapped their three-game losing streak in this California private-school rivalry. USC racked up 623 total yards and won the first Pac-12 game of the new season by beating the hard-nosed Cardinal (1-1, 0-1) at their own physical game.

Ronald Jones II rushed for 116 yards and scored a touchdown in his ninth consecutive game as USC excelled at Stanford's traditional strengths, running the ball for 307 yards and controlling both lines of scrimmage. Turnovers and penalties by the Trojans kept it fairly close, but freshman Stephen Carr added 119 yards rushing, and Jones cartwheeled into the end zone with a clinching 23-yard TD run with 4:15 to play.

Keller Chryst passed for 172 yards and two touchdowns, while Bryce Love had a 75-yard TD run among his 160 yards rushing for the Cardinal, who hadn't played since their season-opening win over Rice in Australia last month.

After a scoreless third quarter, USC made a 90-yard scoring drive capped by Mitchell's second TD on a feathery 11-yard TD pass by Darnold with 9:42 to play. Stanford stayed close with J.J. Arcega-Whiteside's TD catch with 6:41 to play, but Jones' incredible second TD run capped a smooth 75-yard drive in USC's 11th consecutive win at the Coliseum.

Stanford had won eight of its last 11 meetings with USC in a dominant stretch that began with its historic 2007 upset victory at the Coliseum.

After USC scored 49 points in its season opener, Darnold's offense again was in fine form from the start. USC scored four touchdowns on five lengthy drives in the first half, with Darnold hitting Burnett for two of his three TD passes.

USC moved 74 yards on two plays late in the half to take a 28-17 lead on Burnett's leaping 25-yard TD grab.

THE TAKEAWAY

Stanford: That 62-point performance in the season opener Down Under was impossible to replicate against a top Pac-12 defense, and the Cardinal's offense will know it must add versatility to the attack. Stanford's defense also had big problems at the line of scrimmage, and that isn't a problem with which the Cardinal have much experience.

USC: This talent-laden offense has appeared to have the makings of a juggernaut so far. Darnold returned to 2016 form with a smooth, poised performance against a vaunted conference opponent, while the Trojans' receivers appear to be much more reliable than coach Clay Helton feared. USC's defense also stepped up after halftime and shut down one of the Pac-12's best.

UP NEXT

Stanford: The Cardinal's three-game stretch away from home to open the season concludes at San Diego State.

USC: The Trojans welcome Texas to the Coliseum for a meeting of two powerhouse programs.

Justin Wilcox may be on to something at Cal

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AP

Justin Wilcox may be on to something at Cal

We should have surmised that college football was trying a new marketing campaign when Cal -- sad, downtrodden, debt-savaged Cal – beat North Carolina in Chapel Hill as a 13-point underdog.

Then Howard, a sub-average FCS team with three winning records in this century, became the largest underdog in history to win outright by beating UNLV at Vegas, 43-40.

And finally, UCLA parlayed a deft 44-10 late third-quarter deficit to Texas A&M into a 45-44 win, with the winning touchdown drive featuring a fake spike by Bruins quarterback Josh Rosen, all of which inspired an A&M regent to demand the immediate firing of head coach Kevin Sumlin.

And that new marketing scheme?

Easy. “We Play Drunk; We Coach Drunk/We Vent Drunk.”

Now with a 92-game inventory (and that’s just the bowl eligible games; don’t even ask me about St. John’s beating St. Scholastica, 98-0), you ought to have a few clangers here and there. I mean, Liberty (plus-33) beat Baylor, 48-45, making karma 1-0 this season.

But this is the part of college football that is riveting – the early-season piefights and coach-killers. You don’t typically get Howards and Libertys and Roy Buzbees (the A&M regent with the itchy trigger finger) right off the bat, but you absolutely never get them later.

And Cal? Justin Wilcox may be on to something, and if so, we can stop calling them downtrodden and debt-riddled. I mean, we don’t have to, but if this is the new Cal, we may as well fit this into the sport’s new paradigm:

Playing drunk, and for a precious few, being really good at it. And now that regents are in play on Labor Day, this could be the best season ever.

Until, as is always the case, Alabama fun-kills the whole thing like it always does.

Blind long snapper fulfills dream at USC: 'I can't quite believe it yet'

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USATSI

Blind long snapper fulfills dream at USC: 'I can't quite believe it yet'

LOS ANGELES -- Jake Olson first imagined this moment long before he lost his vision to cancer eight years ago.

Southern California scored a touchdown. Coach Clay Helton turned to the sideline and yelled his name: "Are you ready? Let's get this done!"

The blind long snapper's teammates guided him onto the field. They lined him up over the ball. The referee blew the whistle.

And Olson's snap between his legs was straight and true.

"It turned out to be a beautiful moment," Olson said.

Olson delivered a flawless extra-point snap for the final point in No. 4 USC's 49-31 victory over Western Michigan on Saturday.

Although a rare form of retinal cancer took his sight as a child, Olson simply refused to give up on his dream of playing for his beloved Trojans. After years of dedication to football and two seasons of practice, Olson's dream abruptly came true in USC's season opener.

Olson got his snap to holder Wyatt Schmidt with 3:13 to play, and the ensuing kick set off a wild celebration for teammates and fans in awe of an indelible moment for an unstoppable athlete.

"I just loved being out there," Olson said. "It was an awesome feeling, something that I'll remember forever. Getting to snap at USC as a football player ... I'm trying to say as much as I can, because I can't quite believe it yet."

Olson's snap was the culmination of years of dedication to a seemingly crazy dream. The 20-year-old junior has been around the USC football program since 2009 thanks to former coach Pete Carroll, who first heard about Olson's cancer and his love for the Trojans.

Olson lost his left eye when he was 10 months old. The cancer forced doctors to remove his right eye when he was 12 - and he asked to watch the Trojans' practice on the night before his surgery.

"To take a situation that ugly, and then to fast-forward eight years and to have that same kid be able to snap on the football field with the team that really got him through that time, is just beautiful," Olson said. "It's emotional. Incredible."

Although he is completely blind, Olson managed to play two years of high school football in his native Orange County. He has worked out with the Trojans since 2015, enrolling at the school with a scholarship for physically challenged athletes and gradually persuading his USC coaches and teammates that his dream was far more than just a stunt.

Helton vowed to get Olson into a blowout game against an opponent that would agree not to do anything that might injure the long-snapper. Western Michigan had no problem after the Trojans' final TD essentially put the game out of reach.

The score was close for most of a scorching afternoon at the Coliseum, so Olson's parents, Brian and Cindy, didn't think today would be the day - until suddenly, it was.

"I was just screaming," Cindy Olson said. "I was jumping up and down. We had everybody around us, even people we didn't know, just screaming. I was saying, 'That's my son!' Are you kidding? This was history. This was amazing. This was Jake's dream."

Olson takes his role with the Trojans very seriously: He has gained 40 pounds of muscle in two years since joining the team, and he is noticeably brawnier this year. Schmidt is his constant companion, guiding him to the proper spots on the field during practice.

"Jake has worked his butt off ever since he got here," quarterback Sam Darnold said. "It's awesome to see him finally get a chance."

Helton also said this moment wasn't a one-time event: Olson will snap again for the Trojans whenever the proper situation arises in a game.

Carroll allowed Olson to lead the USC band after a game when he first became a part of the program eight years ago. Olson did it again Saturday, climbing the ladder and holding aloft the sword traditionally used to lead the band - but he did it in his game uniform.

"This has all come full circle," Cindy Olson said. "Isn't that cool? I don't think I'll be able to sleep tonight."