Angela Sun will bring fresh perspective to A's home telecasts

Angela Sun will bring fresh perspective to A's home telecasts

MESA, Ariz. — From reporting on-site at the Winter Olympics to investigating ocean contamination in the Pacific, Angela Sun’s career resume is diverse and wide-ranging.

Now she tackles another challenge as CSN California’s new A’s in-game reporter, where she’ll interact with players, coaches and fans to bring viewers a fresh perspective during home telecasts at the Coliseum.

Sun joins the A’s broadcast team during a time of increased optimism surrounding the franchise’s future, with an announcement expected this year about a location for the A’s to build a new ballpark in Oakland.

“I’m excited about Oakland, and the A’s organization specifically, because there’s just so much energy and good vibes right now,” Sun said. “Oakland is such a special place, and I feel like there are so many things that have yet to be discovered. I’m really excited to explore that, to share fans’ stories, to showcase really all that it has to offer.”

A Saratoga native who attended UCLA, Sun has been somewhat of a trailblazer, becoming the first Asian American female sportscaster to appear on ESPN, Yahoo Sports, Tennis Channel, Fox Sports Net and NBC.

She hosted the Yahoo Sports’ NFL-themed show “Outside The Game,” where her stories ranged from Josh Cribbs’ fashion style to Alan Page’s post-football career as a Minnesota Supreme Court justice. In 2010, she reported for Yahoo on site from Vancouver at the Winter Olympics.

As for her own athletic career growing up in the South Bay, Sun broke into a smile describing how her mother played a part in getting that off the ground.

“My mom would not let me do cheerleading,” she said. “Instead, I did volleyball, basketball and softball until I realized I was vertically challenged and I wasn’t going to grow too much anymore.”

She would soon get into activities like snowboarding and skateboarding, which wound up being good preparation for a stint covering the X Games. In high school Sun even taught herself how to surf. Looking back now, she jokes that it wasn’t the safest decision she’s made, but it’s an example of how she dives into things that catch her interest.

“I’m just pretty stubborn that way,” she said. “If I set my mind to something, I will go 110 percent into it. I like to do my research and I like to be thorough about things. But I’m also the first one to say, ‘I don’t know what I’m talking about.’ And if I don’t, I’ll ask.

“So I try to soak things in like a sponge. And that’s what I’m here for, for the fans and for the players and for the staff and coaches … I want to share their stories and I want to be that conduit so that we get to learn a little bit more behind the uniform.”

That desire to explore was instilled in Sun by her father, who passed away when she was just starting college. Her love for surfing planted the seed for the feature documentary she directed and produced in 2013. “Plastic Paradise: The Great Pacific Garbage Patch” examines the damaging effects of plastic pollution in the oceans. The film has received critical praise and been shown at more than 60 film festivals. Read up on it at

Sun says her inquisitive nature will guide her reporting on the A’s just as it has her other assignments.

“I think if you’re passionately curious about things,” she said, “it’ll just lead you down different roads.”

Now officially in the fold, Lucroy ready to work with young A's pitchers


Now officially in the fold, Lucroy ready to work with young A's pitchers

The Oakland A's made it official: They finally got their man behind the plate. 

Oakland officially announced the signing of veteran catcher Jonathan Lucroy on Monday. Lucroy's deal is reportedly worth $6.5 million, according to the San Francisco Chronicle's Susan Slusser.

Lucroy joined his new teammates for the first time in Arizona on Monday, and told reporters that he is especially excited to work with the club's young, promising pitching staff. The three returning leaders in innings pitched (Kendall Graveman, Sean Manaea, Jharel Cotton) are all 27-years-old or younger, and 22-year-old top prospect A.J. Puk is pushing for a rotation spot after allowing just one run in three appearances this spring. 

"I'm looking forward to working with these guys and trying to help them get better and get better myself along the way," Lucroy told reporters. "I think that's what it's all about; taking what they do best and try to simplify their approach ... Really, just doing anything I can with them to get hitters out."

Manager Bob Melvin told reporters that he thinks Lucroy's experience will prove beneficial to his young staff.

"If we can't go out and get ourselves a [starting pitcher], that's the next best thing," Melvin told reporters on Monday. "So, he's got a lot of experience, and a great reputation for being a teriffic leader behind the plate."

Lucroy, 31, slashed .265/.345/.371 in 481 plate appearances with the Texas Rangers and Colorado Rockies last season, hitting six home runs with 40 RBI, his lowest marks in those categories since his rookie season in 2010.

In order to accomodate Lucroy's signing the, the A's designated left-handed pitcher Jairo Labourt for assignment. Labourt was acquired off of waivers on Mar. 4, and Labourt's arrival prompted the eventual release of Brandon Moss one month into his Oakland reunion.

Maxwell speaks about anthem protest, but stays mum on legal issues


Maxwell speaks about anthem protest, but stays mum on legal issues

When A's catcher Bruce Maxwell knelt during the anthem last season, he was the first MLB player to do so. He knelt before each of each of Oakland's final nine games, in order to protest racial inequality and in response to President Trump's incendiary comments about NFL players kneeling, but ended the season as the only MLB player to kneel during the anthem. 

This season, he won't kneel at all, he told reporters in a statement on the first day of spring training. 

“Obviously, I didn’t take that lightly,” Maxwell told the San Francisco Chronicle prior to the release of his statement.  “That was to bring awareness to a problem and the face we do see it, we do experience and we have empathy for what’s going on. This year I don’t plan on kneeling. … And we’ll move on forward.”

While Maxwell did address his protest during the anthem, he largely did not address his offseason legal issues.

“It’s ongoing, I can’t really discuss details,” he said. “It’s something me and my lawyers are handling.”

On Oct. 28, Maxwell was arrested in Scottsdale after allegedly pointing a gun at a food-delivery person. He pleaded not guilty to felony charges of aggravated assault and disorderly conduct in November, and is set for a settlement conference on April 13 after failing to reach a plea agreement on Monday, according to the Chronicle. 

If an agreement cannot be reached, Maxwell's trial is set to begin on Aug. 9.