Stephen Curry

Eight things that should happen during NBA All-Star Weekend

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AP

Eight things that should happen during NBA All-Star Weekend

The NBA All-Star Game under any format is as hot a mess as the sport can produce, but it is all NBA fans have this weekend. Sorry, no Nets-Suns for you.

But for those of you who need more than the Celebrity Game, the Dunk Contest, the Three-Point Competition and the Magic-Johnson-Gagged-And-Nailgunned-To-His-Chair-So-He-Doesn’t-Get-Caught-Tampering-With-Everyone-On-Both-Rosters Challenge, here are some things that either haven’t happened before or happened so long ago that they should happen again.

- One or both teams should score 200. The 196 scored by the West two years ago was educational enough, and the 192-182 West win last year set a new record for combined points, so this seems like the time for one team to go for two bills. I mean, if you’re going to make the game senseless, why not go all the way?

- Someone should challenge Nikola Jokic’s freshly-minted record for fastest triple double in league history. He did the deed Thursday night against Milwaukee in a stunning (even by Westbrookian standards) 14:33, beating the old record set in – oh for God’s sake – 1955 by Jim Tucker of the Syracuse Nationals. There have only been four triple doubles in All-Star Games, most recently by Kevin Durant last year, but he needed 27 minutes to do so. This is simply slothful indolence, especially in a game with 374 points.

- The two teams should combine for 300 shots. The current high is 286, set two years ago, in a game in which 16 of the 24 players jacked up at least 10. After all, there are standards we have grown accustomed to seeing.

- Someone should be forced to play all 48 minutes as a commemorative hat-tip to the new rest-conscious players and coaches, in honor of the glorious Miami-Philadelphia game at the end of the 2015 season in which the 76ers, who were trying to lose all their games, let Joel Embiid draw up plays during time outs and the Heat in response played six players, four of them (Michael Beasley, Henry Walker, James Ennis and Tyler Johnson) for all 48.

- Stephen Curry, who struggled to make the play he drew up work the other night, should designate Embiid to draw one up Sunday. He is, after all, the game's most experienced player-coach.

- Someone should get ejected as a cheery sendoff to the bad old days between officials and players that will have ended with their happy peace talks this weekend. No player has ever been tossed from an All-Star Game, and Red Auerbach is the only coach, having been tossed in the 1967 game (played at Our Beloved Cow Palace) by official Willie Smith. And if the players won’t go that extra mile for your entertainment (we’re looking at you, Draymond Green), the least one can do is to foul out as an homage to Hakeem Olajuwon, the last player to do so in 1987.

- Cleveland general manager Koby Altman should perform an in-game trade, just to show he isn’t a one-trick pony.

- And finally, Adam Silver should bet on the game as an olive branch to his friends in the gaming industry who think ill of him for that 1% integrity fee gouge. And a helpful hint, A.S. – bet the over; it’s 346. That should get done in three quarters.

 

Malcolm Jenkins: 'I knew I didn't like Steph Curry;' Curry responds

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Twitter/@StephenCurry30

Malcolm Jenkins: 'I knew I didn't like Steph Curry;' Curry responds

Steph Curry was at the Super Bowl on Sunday.

Before the game, he was on the Patriots' sideline.

Eagles safety Malcolm Jenkins took notice:

"I knew I didn't like Steph Curry. I knew I didn't like Steph Curry. That's your boy, Steph Curry. Frontrunner."

On Thursday afternoon, Curry responded on Twitter:

Thanks for reading this hard-hitting news report.

Drew Shiller is the co-host of Warriors Outsiders. Follow him on Twitter @DrewShiller

While Steph warms up, young Kings fan makes last-minute change

While Steph warms up, young Kings fan makes last-minute change

Stephen Curry's name has become synonymous with the top of the NBA's top-selling jerseys. 

Sometimes, his leaguewide popularity surpasses fans' loyalty to their own teams. 

With Curry warming up in front of him at the Golden 1 Center on Friday, a young Sacramento Kings fan made a quick jersey change to show support for the two-time MVP.

Ther's no word whether the fan was wearing a Vince Carter or DeMarcus Cousins No. 15 Kings jersey before donning Curry's No. 30.