Any of Giants' young players part of the solution? 'I really wish...'

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AP

Any of Giants' young players part of the solution? 'I really wish...'

Programming note: Tune in tonight at 10 p.m. for 2017 Giants -- What Happened?!?  Only on NBC Sports Bay Area

SAN FRANCISCO — A few minutes after team executives sat down with reporters and discussed a rough season, Austin Slater walked through an empty clubhouse. 

“I’m done for the day,” he said, smiling, as general manager Bobby Evans offered a greeting. 

Slater’s offseason started in the trainer’s room. He spent Tuesday morning rehabbing from sports hernia surgery and he'll be doing that for several weeks. Slater's rehab schedule is a reminder of one of the most disappointing parts of a 98-loss season. 

If you’re going to flirt with 100 losses, you might as well come away from that experience with three or four young players who proved without a doubt that they can be part of a turnaround. The Giants feel good about Chris Stratton’s chances of being a rotation contributor, and Ty Blach will certainly have a role on next year’s team, but beyond that it’s tough to point to too many young players who are a good bet to be standing in the dugout next opening day. Slater was on his way after a hot start to his career, but injuries kept him off the field most of the second half and the Giants wish he had gotten more at-bats to try and show what he can do. Other young players suffered from the same bad injury luck.

During an interview that will air Wednesday night at 10pm on NBC Sports Bay Area, I asked manager Bruce Bochy what he makes of 2017’s class of younger players. The Giants have said they want to get more athletic. Did any of these 20-somethings show that they can be part of the solution? 

“I really wish that we could have kept these young players healthy so we would have had a longer look and a better evaluation of some of these players who did, I think, show that they can contribute on a major league level,” Bochy said. “Slater, for one, I think he stepped up and he was doing a nice job. Because of the groin injury, we missed him a lot.”

Slater, who turns 25 in December, hit .282 with three homers and a .339 on-base percentage in 117 rookie at-bats. The Giants hope he is able to recover from surgery in time to play winter ball, and doing so would allow him to compete for an outfield job next spring. The Giants plan to give left field to Denard Span, but some of their younger outfielders could see more time in right field, or one could develop into a platoon partner. 

It’s unclear where that leaves Parker, who hits left-handed — like Span — and is out of options. The 28-year-old had a .746 OPS after returning and played good defense.

“Here was a guy that you talk about (the) power, and he was going to be our left fielder,” Bochy said. “He runs into a wall and breaks his clavicle, so he never really got a chance to get on track. So that’s disappointing.”

Parker and Mac Williamson are scheduled to play winter ball, along with Christian Arroyo, who provided a jolt in his first couple of weeks but slumped to a .192 average. Arroyo would have returned for another round, but he suffered a season-ending hand injury. He's just 22, and if the Giants don’t add a third baseman, he should compete for that starting job next March. 

“He made an impact right away,” Bochy said. “He started to struggle but we did have to rush him up.”

Bochy felt Ryder Jones was put in the same situation. The 23-year-old hit .173 as a rookie while playing at both corners. He is also scheduled to play winter ball. 

“I think it’s fair to say we rushed him,” Bochy said. “He didn’t have a full year in Triple-A but we played him. Sometimes this happens to young players — not sometimes, but most of the time, they’re going to struggle. You’re going to suffer with young players who aren’t quite ready, but at the same time you hope to benefit down the road.”

A little further down the road, the Giants have a class of intriguing prospects. For more on the front office’s evaluations of Chris Shaw, Steven Duggar, Tyler Beede and others, you can watch our season-ending special Wednesday night at 10pm on NBC Sports Bay Area. Bochy, Brian Sabean, Bobby Evans and Larry Baer discussed the 2017 year and the roster outlook for 2018. Bochy is hopeful that next year’s squad has a bit more luck with young players. 

“Hopefully we do find lightning in a bottle with one of these young guys that can impact our offense,” he said. 

Bruce Bochy to undergo another heart procedure

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USATI

Bruce Bochy to undergo another heart procedure

SAN FRANCISCO — The Giants didn’t announce any significant health issues for players at Tuesday’s season-ending press conference. Their manager wasn’t so lucky. 

Bruce Bochy will undergo an ablation procedure next week, the latest in a line of minor procedures to deal with heart issues. Bochy said he has an atrial fibrillation. The operation will be his second of the year, although he said it is considered minor, like previous ones. 

Indians manager Terry Francona had a similar procedure this season and made it back quickly. He will manage in the postseason, and Bochy made it clear he plans to do the same in the future. He is still adamant that the heart issues will not keep him from doing his job in the final two seasons of an extension that kicked in this opening day.

“I don’t want anyone to think this has an effect on my work, or ability to work,” Bochy said. “This is something that is not uncommon.”

Bochy, 62, said he almost had the procedure during the season but he pushed it back.
 

Giants enter offseason 'very concerned' about their defense

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USATI

Giants enter offseason 'very concerned' about their defense

SAN FRANCISCO — Brian Sabean knew in March that his team had some issues. By May, he knew that the deficit was mathematically overwhelming. In September, he watched the Giants stumble to the finish line and finish in last place in the National League West. 

On the third day of October, Sabean — having watched all that — sent a passionate message to the fans.

“We had a last-place season. That can happen in sports, just like you have a lost year in life,” he said. “But we’re not last-place people and we’re not a last-place organization. We’re the furthest thing from that … This isn’t a ‘blow it up,’ this isn’t a rebuild. We hope it’s a reset. 

“Now, what it’s going to take and how that plays out to go from where we finished to being competitive to a playoff team, that’s incumbent on all of us to figure out. That’s been going on for months. The autopsy has been going on for months. I don’t know how much more we can tolerate knowing that the patient got sick and why it got sick. Fortunately, it didn’t die.”

At times Tuesday, the four men on a podium at AT&T Park looked like they had witnessed a death. This was not the press conference they wanted to be giving, in part because of the date. Sabean, Larry Baer, Bobby Evans and Bruce Bochy sum up every season from that podium, but it’s rare that they’re doing so before the first playoff game. Never have they had to do so after such a wildly disappointing run. 

There were few details, because it’s too soon to give details. Any coaching changes will be announced later, and the roster is healthy heading into the offseason, for the most part. While the Giants have spent months formulating an offseason plan, tampering laws exist and they’re also just not sure which players might be available. 

There was a general outline, though, and you didn’t have to read between the lines much. The clear priority is fixing the outfield defense, with the thought that doing so would have a cascading effect. The outfield was worth negative 45 defensive runs saved, per the Fielding Bible, a distant last in the majors. The A’s were 29th at negative 32. The Dodgers, by comparison, saved 14 runs in their outfield, per that metric. 

The eye test matches the numbers, and the Giants believe a change in center field can lead to much better results for a pitching staff that disappointed in 2017. Denard Span is preparing to move to left field, and team executives hinted Tuesday that they could also make a move in right and perhaps limit Hunter Pence’s playing time if there’s a complete outfield overhaul.

“Defense is something we’re very concerned about,” Evans said. “It’s one of the ways we can help support our pitching, and it’s important we support our pitching with excellent defense. We struggled in that area this year.”

The Giants have a list of defensive-minded outfielders they will pursue, and the focus is on trades, not free agency. They’re not thought to be big fans of players like Lorenzo Cain, who is 31. The focus is on getting younger and more athletic, and hopefully finding a center fielder who would be under team control for several years. 

In a perfect world, the Giants would add right-handed power with their new outfielder. It may be tough to do otherwise, although Evans joked Tuesday that the team might get Madison Bumgarner more at-bats next year. While Bochy would love a masher to take over the cleanup spot and protect Buster Posey, team executives were vague about that pursuit on Tuesday. 

They did not, however, waffle on how much work is to be done. 

“We can’t come back next season with the same roster and expect different results,” Evans said.