Giants

With Alonzo Powell hire, Giants aren't going away from their roots

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AP

With Alonzo Powell hire, Giants aren't going away from their roots

SAN FRANCISCO — When Giants officials met the media two days after the end of a 98-loss season, they did not indicate that adding power is at the top of the priority list. A month of watching teams slug their way through playoff games didn’t change that feeling, even with a former Astro joining the staff. 

During a conference call a few minutes after he was officially announced as the organization’s new hitting coach, Alonzo Powell said his focus isn’t just on bringing the Giants into the power era. 

“You’ve also got the understand the ballpark,” Powell said. “You’re not just going to turn around and hit home runs, everybody. The biggest thing is we have to find hits, we have to find walks, we have to find ways to get on base and keep the chain moving to the next guy. You have to understand the league and the NL West is one of the hardest places to hit in baseball. We have to do the little things to compete, to get on base and get runners over and get the runner in. Those are the things we have to be efficient in if we’re going to succeed the way we want to succeed.”

That’s the way the Giants have won in the past, in large part because they play in a park that stifles power and discourages free agent sluggers from coming here. So, if you were holding out for J.D. Martinez, you shouldn’t hold your breath. And if you’re on Stanton Watch, well, that has never sounded particularly likely either. The Giants will be in on any chase, but after weeks of meetings, vice president of baseball operations Brian Sabean said the three focus areas are center field defense, third base, and upgrading the bullpen. Do any of those mesh with Giancarlo Stanton? Nope. 

Powell would surely love to start his time in San Francisco by working with an imported slugger, but in his introductory remarks, he said the focus is on challenging the current core and embracing the tough competition of the NL West.

A San Francisco native who grew up watching Willie Mays, Powell was a late addition to the staff. He was on an initial list of candidates given to general manager Bobby Evans by outgoing hitting coach Hensley Meulens, but the Giants had to wait for an interview because the Astros were quite busy throughout October. Between the second and third games of the World Series, Powell flew to San Francisco to meet with management and Bruce Bochy. 

Bochy seemed to like what he heard, and he noted that Powell played a role in developing a star-studded Astros lineup. When Bochy talked about Powell’s work, however, it wasn’t the homers that came to mind. It was another stat. 

“They cut back their strikeouts and they were able to play small ball (when needed) and keep the line moving,” he said. 

The Astros were second in the majors with 238 homers, 110 more than the Giants, but they weren’t just swinging from the heels. They ranked dead last in the majors with 1,087 strikeouts, a huge improvement over 1,482 in 2016. The Giants, known in the past for keeping rallies moving, struck out 1,204 times after just 1,107 in 2016. 

“You have to adapt to your club and the club that you have, and I don’t know if it’s a club that’s going to hit more home runs,” Bochy said of the 2018 Giants. “If you’re a club like we are then we have to do the little things and cut back on the strikeouts and move runners.

“You can’t be who you’re not. You try to improve in all areas, but you you’ve got to be who you are.”

Report: Giants make trade offer for Giancarlo Stanton

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USATSI

Report: Giants make trade offer for Giancarlo Stanton

The hot stove is heating up. 

Giancarlo Stanton is the biggest name swirling in trade rumors and the Giants are reportedly pushing forward in their attempt to acquire the slugger. San Francisco's front office has proposed a trade to Miami for Stanton, according to Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic

Details of what the Giants offered have not been reported yet. 

Stanton, who recently turned 28, is guaranteed $295 million over the next 10 seasons. His contract includes a full no-trade clause and an opt-out after 2020. 

On Thursday, Stanton was named the National League MVP after hitting .281 with a league-leading 59 home runs and 132 RBI. The last MVP to be traded in the offseason after winning the award was Alex Rodriguez from the Rangers to the Yankees before the 2004 season. 

How seven Giants prospects performed in the 2017 Arizona Fall League

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USATSI

How seven Giants prospects performed in the 2017 Arizona Fall League

The Arizona Fall League came to an end for seven Giants prospects on Thursday as the Scottsdale Scorpions (12-17-1) came up short from playing in Saturday's championship game. 

Let's take a look at how these seven names fared against some of the top young talent in all of baseball. 

The Hitters

As the Giants are linked to trade targets in center field like Billy Hamilton and Jackie Bradley Jr., a young in-house option only helped his case in the desert.

Steven Duggar likely would have seen the AT&T outfield this season, but his season was hindered by injuries, keeping him to only 44 games between three levels. With the Scorpions, Duggar took advantage of his opportunity with more at-bats. 

Duggar left Arizona with a .263/.367/.421 slash line over 20 games. The speedy lefty also stole nine bases and hit three home runs. Even if the Giants go for an experienced glove in center field this offseason and keep Duggar, the 24-year-old has also played 135 games in right field during his minor league career. 

For the second straight year, the Giants sent catcher Aramis Garcia to the AFL. And he's sure to be coming home much happier this go around with an up-and-down campaign.

Splitting time behind the plate with three other catchers, Garcia appeared in 13 games and slashed .259/.293/.333 and hit one home run. Garcia struggled to get one base with only one walk to 10 strikeouts, but showed his natural ability to drive runs in with 10 RBI. 

Rounding out the Giants' trio of bats they sent to Arizona is arguably their top prospect, but his time in the AFL was cut short. Chris Shaw only played in five games and hit .158. He dealt with a sore shoulder.

The Pitchers

The Giants sent two starting pitchers (Tyler Beede and Joan Gregorio) and two relievers (Tyler Cyr and D.J. Snelten) to the AFL. 

Pitching for the first time in nearly three months, Beede showed exactly why he's the Giants' top pitching prospect. Beede went 0-1 with a 4.50 ERA in four starts, but his final three show the potential he's full of -- 14 innings pitched, three earned runs, a 1.93 ERA, 10 strikeouts and only one walk. 

Gregorio, who was suspended this season for Performance Enhancing Drugs, pitched in eight games (three starts) for Scottsdale. He left with a 1-0 record and 5.87 ERA. In Triple-A, Gregorio went 4-4 with a 3.04 ERA this year over 13 starts. The 25-year-old presents an interesting arm that can help sooner than later in the bullpen. 

Cyr's stats don't look pretty (0-1, 5.63 ERA, 8 IP), but he's catching some attention. The right-hander was named to the Fall Stars Game and is most likely to start 2018 in Triple-A after converting 18 saves at Double-A in 2017. 

Snelten, a 6-foot-7 lefty, impressed in eight appearances out of the bullpen. He didn't allow an earned run until his final outing of the fall, bringing his ERA from a perfect 0.00 to 2.25 in 12 innings pitched.

After combining for a 2.20 ERA to go with an 8-1 record between Double-A and Triple-A in 2017, Snelten is a name to know as the Giants look to find more lefties for their bullpen.