Giants

EXTRA BAGGS: Why isn't Posey catching Timmy?

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EXTRA BAGGS: Why isn't Posey catching Timmy?

Programming note: Rockies-Giants coverage kicks off tonight at 6:30 p.m. with Giants Pregame Live, only on Comcast SportsNet Bay Area!

SAN FRANCISCO Call it the Case of the Curious Batterymate.

The burning topic on the pregame show continues to be TimLincecum, Buster Posey and why they aren't working together from a distance of 60 feet, 6 inches.

Once again Tuesday night, Lincecum worked with backup catcher Hector Sanchez. The situation is beyond curious for the faithful and those who cover the team, and its only going to amplify with the national press as we beginto speculate about things like postseason rosters, lineups and the like.

RELATED: Lincecum edging closer to readiness

I really cant tell you if there is some kind of riftbetween Lincecum and Posey, but its pretty clear that this goes much deeperthan Bochys explanation that hes trying to keep his cleanup hitter fresh.

If I had to speculate, knowing their personalities a bit,this is what Id tell you:

Posey has always struck me as a honor-roll student, someone who pores over and follows thescouting reports, and wants to pitch to each hitters weaknesses. Lincecum, as we know, ismore about jazz improvisation on the mound, finding his own way whiledetermining what pitches are working on a given night. Maybe those twoapproaches can be less than compatible at times.

Sanchez, we know, has more of a lets go get em mentality when he straps on the shinguards. Lincecum draws energy from an animated presence behind the plate. And if Lincecum hadnt been able to establish a rapport with the young catcher, Bochy wouldnt have the choice. He'd have to pair Posey withhis two-time Cy Young Award winner.

"Its a great point, Bochy said. Hector is doing a nicejob throwing and receiving and calling the game. I think theyre compatiblewith each other and thats one reason lately youve seen Hector back there forthe most part.

Lincecum, both publicly and privately, has vowed that he hasno issue with Posey catching him. Posey has said there is no problem on his end, either. Both players have trustworthy reputations.

While it's unfair to read anything beyond his words, Lincecum offers nothing but praise for Sanchez.

He has a knack for what Im going to go to, Lincecum said.Ive beaten the (stuffing) out of him at times and he keeps going back thereand catching. Hes doing a great job for myself and for the team.

One other issue that looms for postseason play: We've seen that Sanchez iswilling to station himself in front of the plate with a runner bearing down onhim. Posey, under orders from above, stands well into fair territory when hereceives the ball and then tries to reach back with a swipe tag. The Giantshave allowed probably a half-dozen runs this season out of an abundance ofcaution -- understandable, to be sure, given Poseys catastrophic collision last year that left him unable towalk for four months.

But will that devil's bargain extend into the postseason?

In the playoffs, one run can make all the difference. Everygame in the 2010 NLDS against Atlanta, for instance, was a one-run affair. Sothat might be one more reason Bochy will give thought to having Sanchez catchLincecum andor Barry Zito in the postseason, and put Posey at first base.

We'll have to wait and see.

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Angel Pagan tied and broke Willie Maysfranchise record for triples on the last road trip.

On Tuesday night, he got a taste of what it might have feltand sounded like if hed done it at home.

Pagan extended his own San Francisco-era franchise record inthe eighth inning when he hit his 14th triple, and the selloutcrowd met the moment with a standing ovation. Pagan tipped his helmet toacknowledge it.

Oh definitely, a special moment for me at least to get onemore in front of them, said Pagan, who has hit seven of his triples atAT&T Park and seven on the road. Theyve shown me a lot of support, so Idedicate it to them.

Pagans helmet tip was a nice gesture. But plate umpireAngel Hernandez thought less of the way Pagan flipped his bat high in the airafter striking out on a called pitch to end a rally in the sixth inning.

Hernandez told Pagan that he drew a fine for an equipmentviolation, but Pagan misunderstood and thought he had been ejected. Giantsmanager Bruce Bochy rushed out as the conversation became animated, trying toensure his center fielder wouldnt actually draw the thumb.

He was animated but he just wanted to talk it out, Bochysaid. He didnt realize it (the equipment violation) was automatic. Hesintense. He just thought it was unfair. He was upset at himself, not the call.

Said Pagan: I flipped my bat and was going to flip myhelmet and go to center field. I wasnt showing anybody up.

Maybe he didnt realize he flipped his bat so high in theair.

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Gregor Blanco came off the bench and hit a double. He alsoplayed catch in the outfield. Hes good to start, and Xavier Nady had a nicegame as well. So consider that left field platoon an active situation.

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Just a number? Longoria says slow down with concerns of Giants' aging roster

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AP

Just a number? Longoria says slow down with concerns of Giants' aging roster

The Giants added two premier face of the franchise players this offseason in Evan Longoria and Andrew McCutchen. Together the two have combined for eight All-Star Game appearances. 

What they don't bring to San Francisco though, is youth. Longoria (32) and McCutchen (31) are the latest to join an again Giants roster. Buster Posey turn 31 in March, Johnny Cueto turns 32 in February, Hunter Pence turns 35 in April, Brandon Crawford turns 31 in January, and Brandon Belt turns 30 in April.

Father Time though, is far from getting Longoria and the rest of the Giants' stars according to the third baseman. 

"I believe that all of us believe we're in our prime and we are more than capable of competing," Longoria said Wednesday on KNBR. "That's just ways of making waves in the news. Our job is to just go out and do our job. I think we'll be just fine." 

Longoria is entering his 11th season in the big leagues. That has certainly added wear and tear on him, but also added knowledge of his body. 

"I'm definitely a different player," Longoria says now at 32 compared to 22. "There's a lot of ways that I prepare now that I didn't have to do or I didn't know how to do when I was a younger player. For me personally, it's going to be quite an experience."

While Longoria and McCutchen may not have the freshest pair of legs in baseball, they are two of the most durable players in the game. In 2017, both players appeared in 156 out of 162 games.

"Being prepared for the season is one thing and I know how to do that and I know how to get myself ready for that," Longoria said. "It's just a matter of the day in and day out homework so to speak that I'll have to do. That's gonna change based on the league and based on the division."

Evan Longoria reacts to Giants' 'big, big acquisition' of Andrew McCutchen

Evan Longoria reacts to Giants' 'big, big acquisition' of Andrew McCutchen

When Evan Longoria heard he was being traded to the Giants, he instantly thought of the three World Series trophies. 

"They've won three World Series in the past eight years or whatever, everyone knows that," Longoria said Wednesday on KNBR. "It's a great place to be. The fan base is amazing. I'm just looking forward to playing in front of that and being a part of that." 

That's true, the Giants have won three titles in the last eight years. At one point, it was three in five years, building a modern-day dynasty. That also means they have come up short the last three years. 

In 2017, the Giants fell well beyond short. Playing his whole career in the American League East for the Tampa Bay Rays, Longoria didn't realize quite how bad things were going in San Francisco this past season. 

His wife did though. 

"My wife was actually the one that said, 'Hey, did you know the Giants basically had the worst record in baseball last year?'" Longoria shared. "I said 'I'm excited to be going to a contender' and she said 'Uhh... wait a second here.' But I know that those things happen and it's very tough to compete atop of the division every year and there's years that you have to punt so to speak and start preparing for next year." 

None of that matters to Longoria. The past is the past. All Longoria cares about now is 2018 and beyond. And he believes the Giants are in line to make some more Even Year Magic.

"I truly believe that this organization, obviously with the moves that they've made this offseason, with the recent acquisition of [Andrew] McCutchen, I believe that they're still not done," Longoria says. "I think they wanna do a few more things and that shows a committment to winning. We're definitely on the path to turning it around this year." 

The Giants acquired McCutchen from the Pirates on Monday for prospects Bryan Reynolds and Kyle Crick. Longoria couldn't be any more excited to be in the same lineup as McCutchen. 

"It's a big, big acquisition," Longoria said. "I think when you look at Cutch's numbers, they speak for themselves. When you look at what he's done on the baseball field is probably some of the best numbers and performances in the last 10 years in the National League.

"When you add a player like that, it brings a mindset that the team is committed to winning and I've heard nothing but great things about McCutchen in the clubhouse and off the field too. Whether or not you can quantify it, I believe those things go a long way." 

Longoria and McCutchen combined for 48 home runs and 174 RBI in 2017.