Giants

Giants feel Stanton meeting went well, but they continue to wait

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USATI

Giants feel Stanton meeting went well, but they continue to wait

SAN FRANCISCO -- Late in a 98-loss season, Giants coaches and officials often brought up some version of the same concern: "We're not just bad, we're also boring."

It remains to be seen if the next variation of the Giants roster will be much better. But you can say definitively that the race to piece it together certainly hasn't been boring.

Giants officials woke up Monday morning waiting to hear if Giancarlo Stanton will waive his no-trade clause, clearing the way for the Marlins to trade him. At the same time, they are preparing to meet face to face with Japanese superstar Shohei Ohtani, a potential two-way star.

Brian Sabean and Bobby Evans already had one big meeting, sitting down with Stanton and his representatives last week in Los Angeles. Per sources familiar with the discussion, the Giants came away from that meeting feeling that it had gone very well. There is increased optimisim in the organization that this will actually happen, assuming Stanton gives his blessing. 

Stanton, though, still has not given an indication one way or the other. USA Today's Bob Nightengale reported over the weekend that he did not eliminate the Giants or Cardinals during separate meetings last week, but there has also been no indication that he has agreed to waive his no-trade clause. The Giants believe they have the right trade package in place, so they've tried to alleviate Stanton's specific concerns. Those include, per sources, financial concerns. Stanton stands to lose somewhere between $20-25 million over the course of the deal by switching from Florida's tax code to California's, and it's believed that his representatives have introduced such issues. 

The Giants are not unfamiliar with this type of play. Johnny Cueto hoped to have the final year of his contract turned into a guaranteed year instead of a club option, and it's possible Stanton's side has introduced the same type of arrangement for his 2028 option. The sides also could agree on changes to his opt-out clause to try and sweeten the deal. 

From a baseball perspective, the Giants appear comfortable with the case they're making. Stanton has brought specific roster-related questions to the team, but the Giants did not -- at least last week -- feel he needed to be swayed by players. Unlike in the past, they did not call in some of their stars, relying instead on Sabean and Evans for a conversation that's believed to have centered mostly around business.

The same will not hold true when the front office meets with Ohtani this week. The Giants can offer him only $300,000, but they are one of seven finalists according to Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic, and the decision will be made purely on baseball terms. In that respect, the Giants feel they have plenty to offer. They already have mapped out a schedule for Ohtani should he choose to try and play both ways in San Francisco, giving him the chance to start every turn and also pile up more than 300 at-bats. At the very least, that presentation was intriguing enough to get them to the finalist round. 

Dodgers acquire Kemp in five-player trade, including former Giants infielder

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USATSI

Dodgers acquire Kemp in five-player trade, including former Giants infielder

Matt Kemp is returning to the place where he began his major league career, reacquired by the Los Angeles Dodgers on Saturday as part of a five-player trade with the Atlanta Braves that creates more financial flexibility for the reigning NL champions.

The Dodgers sent first baseman Adrian Gonzalez, oft-injured starting pitchers Scott Kazmir and Brandon McCarthy, infielder Charlie Culberson and cash to Atlanta for the 33-year-old Kemp.

Gonzalez agreed to waive his no-trade clause after receiving assurance from the Braves that he would be designated for assignment since they are already set at first base with Freddie Freeman.

"This allows him the opportunity to go and find some playing time," new Braves general manager Alex Anthopoulos said.

After sitting on the sidelines during the recent winter meetings, the Dodgers moved quickly to dump nearly $50 million in salary committed to Gonzalez, Kazmir and McCarthy for 2018. Kemp is owed about $43 million over the next two seasons.

Los Angeles was looking to reduce baseball's highest payroll of $240 million last season as a way of lowering exposure to higher luxury taxes.

The deal made sense for the Braves, too, since the players they acquired all have expiring contracts.

"It puts us in an even greater financial position going forward and going into next offseason as well," said Anthopoulos, who was hired from the Dodgers.

Kemp played for the Dodgers from 2006-14, hitting 182 home runs, fourth-most in Los Angeles history. The outfielder hit .276 with 19 homers, 64 RBIs and 23 doubles in 115 games last season with the Braves.

Moving Kemp opens up a potential roster spot for top Braves prospect Ronald Acuna, who turns 20 on Monday. He was the most valuable player of the Arizona Fall League and Baseball America's minor league player of the year.

"We expect Ronald Acuna to be a very good player for a very long time," Anthopoulos said. "When he's ready to go, we're going to look to make room for him and certainly a deal like this won't hurt."

The 35-year-old Gonzalez helped the Dodgers win five straight NL West division titles after being acquired from the Red Sox in August 2012. He was an All-Star in 2015 and led the NL in RBIs in 2014, but went on the disabled list with a herniated disk in his back last season for the first time in his career. He was usurped at first base by NL Rookie of the Year Cody Bellinger.

Gonzalez is owed $21.5 million in the final year of a $154 million, seven-year contract that the Dodgers absorbed in the 2012 trade with Boston.

Kazmir didn't pitch last season because of a hip injury, one of many in his career. The 33-year-old left-hander went 10-6 with a 4.56 ERA in 26 starts in 2016, his first with the Dodgers. He is owed $15 million in 2018.

"I spoke to him and he's pretty encouraged and excited about the work he's been able to do in the offseason, so we're excited to get a look at him in camp," Anthopoulos said. "If we can get him back and he can bounce back, there's certainly some upside there."

McCarthy was 11-7 with a 4.51 ERA in 29 starts over three seasons with the Dodgers. The 34-year-old right-hander missed most of 2015 and 2016 after undergoing Tommy John surgery. He went on the DL three times last season, when he was limited to 19 appearances and went 6-4 with a 3.98 ERA.

McCarthy was added to the Dodgers' World Series roster after missing the first two rounds. He gave up a home run in extra innings of a Game 2 loss to Houston in his only appearance. He is owed $12 million in the last year of a $48 million, four-year deal.

Anthopoulos said he sees McCarthy being in the Braves' rotation, which needs a veteran arm after not re-signing knuckleballer R.A. Dickey and releasing Bartolo Colon during last season.

"He came back at the end of the year and was on the World Series roster because of how good he looked, how good his stuff was, up to 94 (mph) and he started throwing a slider that h

Giants gain payroll flexibility, trade Matt Moore to Texas

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AP

Giants gain payroll flexibility, trade Matt Moore to Texas

On the first night of the Winter Meetings, Giants officials indicated they planned to stay under the $197 million luxury tax line. On the last night of the Winter Meetings, general manager Bobby Evans said he had offers in hand that would allow the club to shed payroll. Friday, it all came together. 

The Giants traded Matt Moore and international bonus pool money to the Texas Rangers in exchange for minor league right-handers Sam Wolff and Israel Cruz. The deal costs them their No. 4 starter, but also gives the Giants an extra $9 million to play with as they look to fill multiple holes. The Giants previously had only about $10 million to spend before reaching the tax line for a fourth straight year, but they now have nearly $20 million as they look for upgrades in center field, right field and third base. 

“This move allows us to reallocate our resources to address our position player needs,” Evans said. “In addition, we are pleased to add two power arms to our system. Our focus remains to strengthen our outfield defense and our everyday lineup.”

Moore, 28, was acquired at the deadline in 2016 in exchange for Matt Duffy, Lucius Fox and Michael Santos. The results were mixed. Moore was a boost to the rotation down the stretch that year and would have gone down as a postseason hero for the Giants had the bullpen not blown Game 4 of the NLDS. He had a 5.52 ERA in 2017, but at the same time, the Giants always felt the trade was worth it. Duffy missed the entire season with an Achilles issue and Fox, while an intriguing prospect, remains far from the big leagues. 

The Giants believed Moore could bounce back next year, and they never waffled with his 2018 option, even though at times it seemed they shouldn't pick it up. Team officials said this week that Moore was already in the Phoenix area working with new pitching coach Curt Young, and they expected big things. 

Instead, Moore is headed to the Rangers and the Giants will dive back into the free agent market. They can fill their starting hole internally, with Ty Blach and Chris Stratton as holdovers and top pitching prospect Tyler Beede viewed as being big league ready. Left-hander Andrew Suarez also is close to being ready for a big league shot. 

Wolff, 26, had a 2.98 ERA as a reliever in Double-A and Triple-A last season. Cruz is just 20 years old and spent last season in rookie ball. He is years away, but this was a deal made with 2018 in mind. 

The Giants dealt from a rare area of strength, and now they'll have a chance to try to bolster a lineup that failed their starters, including Moore.