Giants

Ryan Vogelsong, Jaymee Sire, & RallyEnchilada

920127.jpg

Ryan Vogelsong, Jaymee Sire, & RallyEnchilada

Ryan Vogelsong is a superstitious guy. He revealed to CSN Bay Area that he absolutely musteat chicken enchiladas for dinner the night before he pitches, home or away.

Therefore, we know he is eating them Saturday night because he is taking the mound in Game 6 of the NLCS on Sunday at AT&T Park.

I've decided that Vogelsong won't be the only one enjoying chicken enchiladas Saturday night, as I will be making them myself.

If you want to follow suit, here is my recipe:

5-6 ancho chilis, stemmed and seeded
Boiling water
Olive oil or butter
1 yellow onion, chopped
2-3 cloves garlic, minced
1 teaspoon cumin
1 teaspoon Mexican oreganoSalt, to taste
1 tablespoon tomato paste (optional)
2 cups shredded chicken (rotisserie chicken from the grocery store works great)
Corn tortillas
1-2 cups shredded cheese

Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees.

Place chilis in a bowl and pour boiling water over the top until fully submerged. Cover tightly an allow to steep 15 minutes, or until softened.

Saut onions in a little oil or butter until soft and translucent. Add garlic and spices and saut another minute.

Combine chilis, half of onion mixture and tomato paste (if using) and pure in food processor, adding some of the chili water until it reaches desired consistency. Add more seasoning if necessary.

Combine other half of onion mixture with chicken. Dip each tortilla in a little sauce an fill with chicken mixture. Place in a greased dish.

Pour sauce over the top and sprinkle with cheese. Bake 20 minutes, or until hot and bubbly!

Giants hire David Bell to fill key front office role

bell-ginats-slide-cardinals-2002.jpg
AP

Giants hire David Bell to fill key front office role

SAN FRANCISCO -- A familiar face is returning to the Giants organization to serve a key front office role.

The Giants announced Friday that David Bell, their former third baseman, has been hired as Vice President of Player Development. General manager Bobby Evans said Bell will oversee all aspects of player development, including hitting, pitching, strength and conditioning and the operations of the minor league affiliates. 

"He was the perfect fit," Evans said. "His experience is so strong and encompasses so many aspects of the game. He’s got a really strong base of experience and background and understanding of the game, and he has a passion for the game and working with young players. He really showed a desire to pursue this opportunity." 

Bell, 45, played 12 major league seasons and spent 2002 with the Giants. He hit 20 homers that year as the starting third baseman and scored the winning run in the final game of the NLCS. Since retiring, Bell has served as a minor league manager for the Reds and a big league coach for the Cubs and Cardinals. He spent last season as the bench coach in St. Louis. 

Shane Turner had previously served as farm director, but at the end of the minor league season he was asked to take a role as a special assistant in baseball operations. While Evans did not announce any other changes Friday, there are expected to be other moves within the organization's depth chart. At least one member of the coaching staff is still in the running for a managerial opening. 

Dusty Baker won't be remembered the way he should be remembered

baker-dusty-kid.jpg
AP

Dusty Baker won't be remembered the way he should be remembered

Firing a manager is easy, and there are lots of ways to do it.

Dusty Baker, for example. He worked this year on the last year of a contract, which usually means there won’t be another one, and he relied on his players to deliver the goods.

Which, as we remember from our reading, they didn’t do. Again.

But Baker was marked for the chop unless those players did deliver, and when they didn’t, general manager Mike Rizzo did the expedient thing.

He fired one person rather than several. And changed exactly nothing.

Baker’s managerial career is probably over now, as most teams don’t look at 68-year-olds to fix their teams. He will never manage a  World Series champion, something he ached for, and he was always be caricatured in part as the guy who didn’t speak metric, and who believed in players as men whenever in doubt.

And the Nats didn’t betray him, either. They were always not as good in the big moments because someone else was, and they became part of Washington’s new fetish – Why Can’t We Win One? It’s as if having a cringeworthy President isn’t good enough for them.

So the time came, and he will be replaced by someone who will either win and get credit for work that was largely his, or he won’t win and the town can continue to wallow in its tedious We’re-The-New-Cubs pity. It is the circle of life.

At least it is for groups of people. For individuals, the circle of life is actually nothing more than a straight line that ends abruptly. For Dusty Baker, as it did for Tony La Russa in Phoenix two days earlier, that day came today. He deserves to be remembered as a very good manager who won a lot more than he lost, made more friends than enemies, and was honest from Day One until the end.

Which, as we also know, doesn’t matter a whole lot on days like this.