Athletics

Jury selected in Bonds' perjury trial

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Jury selected in Bonds' perjury trial

March 21, 2011

SAN FRANCISCO (APCSN) -- A jury has been selected in the Barry Bonds perjury trial.

After more than five hours of questioning Monday, prosecutors and Bonds' lawyers agreed on 12 jurors and two alternates from a pool of around 100 prospective jurors.

Bonds played for the San Francisco Giants when he hit 73 homers in a season and when he broke Hank Aaron's career home-run record. He hasn't played since 2007, the year he was indicted.

Bonds has pleaded not guilty to one count of obstruction and four charges of lying to a grand jury when he said he never knowingly took performance-enhancing drugs.

The jury includes four men and eight women. The two alternates also are women.

Bonds was present in a dark suit, with a collection of family members and friends sitting in the front rows of court.

According to firsthand accounts from inside the courtroom, jury selection began at about 9:40 a.m. with the arrival of the 38-person (22 female, 16 male) panel. U.S. District Judge Susan Illston asked basic questions such as where jurors lived, their occupation, a brief family description, their hobbies, had they served on a jury before, among other inquiries.

A handful of jurors mentioned baseball and sports as hobby. One indicated a reluctance to render a judgment against "a great athlete like Mr. Bonds. It might cloud my judgment."

One of the prospective jurors whom prosecutors want excused wrote on her questionnaire: "He is guilty. He lied. He has suffered enuf. There should have been some sort of settlement." The prospective juror identified herself as 61 years old and holding a law degree.

When he initially entered his plea in December 2007, Bonds was met by a huge crowd of media, fans and others as television helicopters hovered overhead. Much of that attention was missing on Monday. About a dozen photographers milled outside, but few fans were there to see Bonds walk into the federal courthouse in San Francisco dressed in a dark suit, white shirt and silver tie.

While Bonds sat with his star-studded legal team at the defense table, Jeff Novitzky, the federal agent who led the investigation of the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative, joined the prosecutors. Bonds is the biggest name to go to trial from the BALCO probe.

Opening statements were expected on Tuesday, and the case was likely to last two to four weeks.

Vallejo-native, free agent-to-be Sabathia after Yankees loss: 'This is my home'

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USATSI

Vallejo-native, free agent-to-be Sabathia after Yankees loss: 'This is my home'

C.C. Sabathia couldn't save the Yankees' 2017 season. And now he has a decision to make.

After nine seasons in New York, the 37-year-old hits the free agent market this winter.

With career earnings nearing $250 million and a 2009 World Series ring already on his resume, would the Vallejo-native consider coming home to play for the A's? That's a question that was posed to NBCSportsBayArea.com Insider Joe Stiglich last week.

While it's a possibility, based on comments after Saturday's ALCS Game 7 loss to the Astros, it sounds like Sabathia doesn't want to leave The Bronx.

“I feel like this is a young team, and we will turn this into something great. This is my home, and I want to see this thing through," Sabathia told reporters, according to The Associated Press.

Curry claims he didn't throw mouthguard at ref: 'I've got a pretty good aim'

Curry claims he didn't throw mouthguard at ref: 'I've got a pretty good aim'

Just before the Warriors officially lost the game in Memphis on Saturday night, their superstar point guard lost his cool.

After not getting a foul call with 43 seconds left in the game, Steph Curry chucked his mouthguard in the direction of referee Scott Wall in a fit of rage reminiscent of Game 6 of the 2016 NBA Finals.

Wall immediately ejected Curry, who continued to argue with the officials.

After the game, Curry wanted to make it clear he wasn't trying to his Wall with his mouthguard.

"If I tried to throw it at him and hit him, I've got a pretty good aim," Curry said told reporters after the game. "I've thrown my mouthpiece plenty of times and thrown it on the floor. Probably not the best thing to do, but I've done it. I own up to it.

"If I was trying to throw it at him or hit him, I would have been able to executed that."

Curry explained why he reacted the way he did.

"That last play, I thought I got fouled. My frustration boiled over, did something stupid, deserved to get kicked out and that's what happened. Obviously learn from it and try not to do it again," Curry told reporters.

Now Curry and the Warriors wait to see if the NBA will suspend or fine him. He has an expectation of what the punishment will be.

"Don't think it will be a suspension or anything. My pockets will be a lot lighter," Curry said after the game.