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Kings force O.T. in Utah but fall to Jazz, 109-102

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Kings force O.T. in Utah but fall to Jazz, 109-102

March 5, 2011BOXSCORE KINGS VIDEONBAPAGE NBASCOREBOARD

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) For the Jazz, just getting a win in front of their fans was more than enough.Al Jefferson scored 27 points and Raja Bell had two crucial jumpers and a steal in overtime to help the Utah Jazz hold off the Sacramento Kings 109-102 Saturday night to stop their home losing streak at seven games.
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"Oh man, to get a win, in any kind of way, is a sense of relief for us," said coach Ty Corbin, who won his first home game as head coach. "The guys have been busting their butts, and it's good to finally get a reward at the end."After the Jazz lost Paul Millsap to injury, Jefferson scored six points in overtime and Utah outscored the Kings 10-2 after Francisco Garcia started overtime with a 3-pointer."Everybody in the gym knew they were going to Jefferson. He delivered more often than not and that was huge for them," Sacramento coach Paul Westphal said.What was less expected was the clutch shooting of Bell, who scored 16 points and made the second of back-to-back jumpers with 17 seconds remaining to put the Jazz up 105-100."It feels good. It was especially good for us to play another close one and figure out how to get over the hump late in the game," Bell said. The Jazz had lost three in a row overall by five points or less.DeMarcus Cousins had 18 points and 18 rebounds and Garcia returned from 21 games on the sidelines to add 18, but the Kings lost for the fourth time in their last five."Just couldn't pull it out. It's a tough place to play for a lot of reasons," Cousins said, "but they just beat us down the stretch and I missed some key free throws,"Cousins was 6 of 11 from the line and missed two foul shots in overtime.Marcus Thornton, who scored 22 points, made a 3-pointer from the left angle with 14.1 seconds left in regulation to tie the game at 95.Jefferson, who tipped in his own miss with 25 seconds left, misfired on a baseline jumper with five seconds to play in regulation. Udrih raced to the other end but his 29-foot desperation runner rimmed out.Even before longtime coach Jerry Sloan abruptly resigned and Deron Williams was traded to New Jersey, the Jazz were struggling at home. Since beating Charlotte 83-78 on Jan. 31, the Jazz had lost seven straight in Salt Lake - their longest home skid since dropping a club-record 12 consecutive games from Feb. 15-March 29, 1982."I didn't even realize we lost that many games at home until I saw it flash across the bottom on ESPN. Our fans don't deserve that. They've been too good to us," Jefferson said.Omri Casspi missed the game because of a sore back so the Kings started a big lineup with Dalembert, Cousins and Green - all 6-foot-11 and taller than anyone in Utah's starting frontcourt.The Kings outrebounded Utah, 50-47, but had a tough time guarding Jefferson down the stretch without Dalembert, who fouled out in regulation.The Jazz blocked 13 shots and made 12 steals and allowed the Kings just one field goal in a 3:56 span of the extra period.Sacramento's Beno Udrih had 16 points as he and Thornton found ways to get shots when the Jazz focused on Cousins. Thornton is averaging more than 21 points in five games since New Orleans traded him to Sacramento.Cousins punctuated a 13-2 run that bridged the third and fourth quarters with a follow dunk at the 8:41 mark to make 83-74 for the Kings.The Jazz struck back with a 12-1 surge to put them back in front. The run was capped with Jefferson's jumper with 4:05 to go."We had that lead, but they basically got three layups off our mistakes," Udrih said. "They got back in the game, got a lift and woke up the crowd. Then, they just brought it home."Notes: Kyrylo Fesenko left the game in the fourth quarter with back spasms after four minutes of play. ... Four other Sacramento players - DeMarcus Cousins (left shoulder strain), Samuel Dalembert (right knee), Jason Thompson (ankles) and Beno Udrih (left thigh bruise) - were all on the pregame injury list but did play. ... Jazz C Francisco Elson also twisted his knee but continued to play and finished with a season-high nine rebounds and a key block. ... Utah is 4-0 in overtime and the Kings are 0-5.

Report: Giants discussed Panik, top prospects in potential Stanton trade

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AP

Report: Giants discussed Panik, top prospects in potential Stanton trade

On Monday morning, some important details emerged.

The Giants discussed Joe Panik and top prospects Tyler Beede and Chris Shaw with the Marlins in a potential trade for Giancarlo Stanton, according to sports radio host Craig Mish.

Last week, San Francisco reportedly made an actual offer for Stanton.

The Giants selected Beede, 24, in the first round (14th overall) of the 2014 draft.

The right-handed pitcher went 6-7 with a 4.79 ERA over 19 starts in Triple-A last season.

[RELATED: Healthy Tyler Beede shows why he's Giants' top pitching prospect]

The Orange and Black took Shaw, 24, in the first round (31st overall) of the 2015 draft.

In 37 games for Double-A Richmond in 2017, he hit .301 with six home runs and 29 RBI.

He was promoted to Triple-A and hit .289 with 18 home runs and 50 RBI in 88 games.

Shaw recently played in the Arizona Fall League, but only saw action in five games because of a sore shoulder.

In his own way, David Lee was a launching pad for the new age Warriors

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AP

In his own way, David Lee was a launching pad for the new age Warriors

So we say Goodbye, once and for all, to David Lee, who was nothing less than the visible lightning rod for all that was good and bad about the Warriors during their advancement from a hut on the outskirts of the NBA to the league’s penthouse suite.

Lee was, in his own way, every bit as much of a launching pad for the New Age Warriors as was Stephen Curry.

Lee, who disclosed his retirement Sunday in a very 2017 America way -- with an Instagram post -- came to the Warriors from the New York Knicks in a July 2010 sign-and-trade deal. He was the one-man brass band providing accompaniment to the announcement of the team being purchased by Joe Lacob and Peter Guber.

An expensive band, too, as the Warriors handed Lee a six-year contract worth $80 million.

Fairly popular in New York, having been the team’s only All-Star in the nine-season span from 2001-02 to 2010-11, Lee became a fast favorite among many Warriors fans because he produced impressive individual numbers for a struggling team with a richly earned inferiority complex.

In 2012-13, Lee’s third season as a Warrior, he became the team’s first All-Star since Latrell Sprewell 16 years earlier. Lee led the NBA in double-doubles, his favorite statistical category. That season, not coincidently, also marked the team’s return to the playoffs after a five-year absence.

Lee by then was partnering with Curry as the leaders of a team -- no, a franchise -- determined to became a player in the NBA. With Guber’s theatrical flair and Lacob’s naked ambition, the Warriors were not going to be stopped.

It became apparent the following season, even as the team was making its second consecutive playoff appearance, that Lee had a ceiling. He could score and rebound well enough to rack up double-doubles, but he was giving away points on the other end. Lee was an awful defender, constantly picked on by opponents.

The Warriors could win a lot of games with Lee as their starting power forward, but they weren’t going to win any championships.

That door didn’t crack open for the Warriors until late in the 2014 season, and it opened wide during the playoffs against the Clippers. Three games into the series, with LA’s Blake Griffin having his way with Lee, Warriors coach Mark Jackson realized he had an answer to his Griffin problem.

Jackson turned to Draymond Green, who played well over the final weeks of the season as Lee recovered from an injury. Green immediately got under Griffin’s skin and stayed there for the rest of the series. More than three years later, Green still terrifies Griffin, which is why the Warriors own the Clippers.

The Clippers won the series in seven games, but the Warriors were enlightened.

Jackson was fired after that series, and Steve Kerr was hired as the new coach. Kerr says he came in believing Lee would be his starting power forward. Lee had the misfortune of straining a hamstring in the final preseason game, pressing Green into the starting lineup. He has been there ever since.

As their 2014-15 season marched on, the Warriors coaching staff began carefully rationing Lee’s reserve minutes to obscure his defensive limitations. In two years, he had gone from a numbers beast and Curry’s chief sidekick to being marginalized on a team bound for a championship.

A member of the 2015 championship team, Lee also was the most glaring casualty of the Warriors amazing ride to the top of the NBA.

His arrival had given them a modicum of credibility, something utterly lacking at the time. That helped the franchise. His departure, traded to the Celtics in July 2015 -- five years to the day after he came to the Bay -- gave the Warriors some immediate cap relief. That also helped the franchise.

After two years bouncing around the league, from the Celtics to the Mavericks to the Spurs last season, Lee is hanging up his sneakers. He’s diving into life with his new fiancée, the tennis star Caroline Wozniacki. Life was good and it should stay good.

Lee has much about which to be proud. He did his job well enough for the Warriors, but not as well as they needed it to be done to reach the very top. No shame in that, none at all.