Warriors

NHL tough guy Rypien laid to rest

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NHL tough guy Rypien laid to rest

From Comcast SportsNet Wednesday, August 24, 2011

BLAIRMORE, Alberta (AP) -- Nearly 1,000 people remembered Rick Rypien on Saturday in
the arena where the Winnipeg Jets forward played his minor hockey.

Just days after the 27-year-old tough guy died suddenly in his southern Alberta home, a large crowd turned out on a bright sunny day at Albert Stella Arena for Rypien's funeral.

Rypien, who last played with the Vancouver Canucks, died Monday at his offseason home in Crowsnest Pass, Alberta, where a police official said a call was answered for a "sudden and non-suspicious" death.

Rypien, who struggled with depression, had signed with the Jets during the offseason after six years with the Canucks.

His death came as a surprise to many who knew him and thought he was on the road to recovery. They said Rypien was looking forward to playing for the newly relocated Jets.

"We were all hopeful," Canucks general manager Mike Gillis said. "We had thought at different times that he had turned a corner and we were making progress but then it would just happen again."

"We had the ability to intervene. We had the opportunity over the past three years to try our hardest to do the best thing. I don't think there's an easy answer to this," he told reporters after the service.

Jets assistant general manager Crag Heisinger knew Rypien from his minor league days with the Manitoba Moose. He signed Rypien to a one-year contract with the Jets.

"The system didn't fail Rick," Heisinger said. "Everybody did as much as they possibly could for him. He did as much as he possibly could for himself.

"It's just nothing could be done at the end. At the end of the day if Rick's happier where he is today we should all be happy for him. Everybody faces challenges. He's no different than anybody else. He fought them like everybody else. It's just in the end the demon depression won out."

Rypien's family remembered him as someone who was gifted athletically but who put friends and family ahead of even his love for hockey.

"My overwhelming question is, why? How could this happen?" his uncle, Allan Rypien Jr., said. "He had a great family, great friends and a great job.

"He fought this disease with everything he had in him. If you knew Rick, he fought with everything he had in him. Unfortunately the disease won the battle."

A number of minor hockey players, wearing Crowsnest Pass Thunder hockey jerseys were
among those in attendance.

An autographed No. 37 jersey from Rypien's time with the Canucks and a poster from his days with the WHL's Regina Pats were part of items scattered among bunches of flowers.

Rypien's former Vancouver teammate Kevin Bieksa was one of the pallbearers. His cousin, former NFL quarterback Mark Rypien attended the service, as well.

The program, with a smiling photo of Rypien in a blue Vancouver jersey, said simply "Until we all meet again."

Rypien is the second NHL tough guy to die during this offseason. New York Rangers enforcer Derek Boogaard died in May in Minnesota due to an accidental mix of alcohol and the painkiller oxycodone.

Klay Thompson randomly interviewed on local NYC news about scaffolding

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AP

Klay Thompson randomly interviewed on local NYC news about scaffolding

With a big break until their next game, the Warriors spent a couple days in New York City.

Klay Thompson spent part of his Monday walking around the city.

And as only Thompson could, he wound up appearing on a local news report. But he wasn't talking about basketball. Not even close.

Courtesy of Twitter user @MP_Trey, Thompson was interviewed on Fox 5 NY to talk about ... scaffolding.

"I usually observe if the piping and stuff is new. Sometimes, you know, something looks like it's been there a while, I try to avoid that," Thompson said in the report.

You can watch the odd video here:

Beede, Garcia among Giants protected from Rule 5 draft

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AP

Beede, Garcia among Giants protected from Rule 5 draft

SAN FRANCISCO — A top pitching prospect highlighted the list of Giants added to the 40-man roster before Monday’s deadline. 

The Giants put right-hander Tyler Beede on their 40-man roster, along with Aramis Garcia, Tyler Herb and D.J. Snelten. The four players were protected from the Rule 5 draft, held in December on the final day of the annual Winter Meetings. To clear roster spots, the Giants designated Orlando Calixte and Micah Johnson for assignment and outrighted Dan Slania to Triple-A. 

Beede, a 24-year-old former first-round pick, likely would have ended up on the roster earlier if not for a groin injury that ended his Triple-A season early. The Giants anticipated him making a September debut, but he ended up needing time in the Arizona Fall League to make up for lost innings. Beede was sharp in the AFL once he knocked the rust off, allowing three runs over 10 innings in his final two starts. He is expected to compete for a rotation spot at some point next year, although he also stands as one of the organization’s best offseason trade chips. 

Garcia, 24, has struggled with injuries at times in the minors, but he hit 17 homers in just 402 at-bats in 2017 and earned a promotion to Double-A Richmond. Garcia is currently one of just two catchers on the 40-man roster. 

Herb was essentially the player to be named later in the Chris Heston deal. The 25-year-old had a 2.76 ERA in 10 starts for Double-A Richmond last season. Snelten is a lefty reliever who had a 2.20 ERA across two levels last season and could break into the big leagues as a bullpen weapon next year. 

The roster now stands at 40 after the churn, which included a couple of players picked up as flyers because the Giants are at the front of the waiver process. Johnson was added in October and infielder Engelb Vielma, added during the season, was claimed by the Phillies on a  waiver claim. Slania, who made his big league debut during the season, cleared waivers and joins Triple-A Sacramento’s offseason roster.