Warriors

See what made Andy Roddick lose his cool

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See what made Andy Roddick lose his cool

From Comcast SportsNet Tuesday, August 16, 2011

MASON, Ohio (AP) -- As soon as Andy Roddick smacked a ball into the stands in a fit of pique, he figured it would cost him. Sure enough, chair umpire Carlos Bernardes assessed him a point penalty that put him behind 2-0 in the third set of his 6-7 (5), 7-5, 6-1 loss to Philipp Kohlschreiber Monday night in the first round of the Western & Southern Open. "Obviously a split-second thing," Roddick said. "Soon as I hit it, I wanted it back. Roddick already had received a warning from for flinging his racket to the court after losing the second set. It was a judgment call for (Bernardes)," Roddick said. "Pretty sure I saw an 8-year-old girl catch it on the way down. He was telling me I hit it as hard as I could. I was like, 'Dude ...'" "It's so frustrating. I certainly accept what I did," Roddick said. "I put him in a bad situation out there, but I do think it's stupid in tennis that -- I mean, in football if someone throws a helmet on the sideline, it's their helmet. We wonder where we lose our ratings battles to the WWF, Monday Night Raw." Although the NFL penalizes players who do things such as throwing their helmets, Roddick would like to see tennis players get a little more leeway in such situations. He cited John McEnroe, for one. "The guy is still getting endorsements because he was allowed to throw" things, Roddick said. "I understand where (Bernardes) is coming from, but at a certain point, you know, you hit a tennis ball into a stadium, someone goes home with a souvenir, and it pretty much ruins the match from there" to penalize the player. "Seems counterproductive," Roddick said. "At a certain point, I would love it if we got out of our own way." As the match went on, Kohlschreiber could see Roddick's frustration growing, and took advantage of it. "I started guessing right and returning balls," the 47th-ranked Kohlschreiber said. "I took the chances, and he got a little frustrated." Also in Monday's first round, Italy's Fabio Fognini upset 14th-seeded Viktor Troicki of Serbia 6-4, 6-1. The 38th-ranked Fognini beat the 16th-ranked Troicki for first time in three matches. France's Richard Gasquet became the first seeded man to advance without a bye. The 14th-seeded Gasquet needed a second-set tiebreaker to overcome Ukrainian Alexandr Dolgopolov 6-1, 7-6 (4). "I did a pretty good tiebreak," Gasquet said. "There was a lot of tension, but I knew it was important because, in the third set, you never know what can happen, so I'm happy." Alex Bogomolov Jr. cruised past Robby Ginepri 6-4, 6-3 in a matchup of Americans. Spain's Fernando Verdasco defeated Brazil's Thomaz Bellucci 6-3, 7-6 (4), Bulgaria's Grigor Dimitrov beat Turkey's Marsel Ilhan 6-3, 7-5, Feliciano Lopez fought off fellow Spaniard Juan Carlos Ferrero 4-6, 6-3, 6-4, and Argentina's David Nalbandian beat Japan's Kai Nishikori 6-4, 6-4. American wild-card Ryan Harrison ousted Argentina's Juan Ignacio Chela 6-3, 6-3, and Chela's countryman, Juan Monaco, came from behind to beat Tommy Haas of Germany 6-7 (5), 6-4, 6-3. Svetlana Kuznetsova became the first seeded woman to advance without a bye. The 14th-seeded Russian beat American qualifier Jill Craybas 6-3, 6-4. Ninth-seeded Andrea Petkovic lost the first set and survived a second-set tiebreaker to pull out a 5-7, 7-6 (5) 6-2 win over Slovakian Jamila Gajdosova, and Ana Ivanovic of Serbia rolled to a 6-0, 6-2 win over qualifier Alexa Glatch of the United States. Petkovic felt as if she almost didn't deserve to win the grueling match that lasted 2 hours, 52 minutes. "I feel terrible," she said. "I feel awful, really, because (Gajdosova) was playing incredible. She was just hitting winners all over. I don't know how long we played, and I felt like I was in the defense all the time. That's not a good feeling, especially for a player like me who likes to be the dominant one, so I just felt terrible all the time. I don't know how I pulled it out, but I'm thrilled that I did." Ivanovic needed just 26 minutes to win her first set and exactly one hour to finish her match. The former French Open champion hoped for a quick start, she said. "It was very important, especially knowing she had a couple of matches under her belt," said the 17th-ranked Ivanovic, forced by a left foot injure to retire while playing eventual champion Kim Clijsters in last year's semifinals. "I had never seen her before, so it was like a new match for me." Ukraine's Alona Bondarenko defeated Japan's Ayumi Morita 6-2, 4-6, 6-2; Israel's Shahar Peer beat Germany's Sabine Lisicki 6-4, 7-6 (4); Czech qualifier Petra Cetkovska defeated Spain's Anabel Medina Garrigues 2-6, 6-2, 6-2, and Italy's Sara Errani beat U.S. qualifier Sloane Stephens 6-1, 7-5.

Young Warriors fan brought to tears after getting surprised with tickets

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Twitter

Young Warriors fan brought to tears after getting surprised with tickets

Christmas came early for one young Warriors fan. 

Posting a video to Twitter, Charles Hinkle Jr. surprised his nephew with Warriors tickets on Friday. Hinkle's Twitter location shows the family is from Hollywood, Fla.

The reaction says it all. 

And the smile confirms it: best Black Friday ever.

The Warriors play the Heat in Miami on December 3 at 4 p.m. PT. The Warriors played the Heat twice last season. They won their first contest in Oakland and then later fell in Miami.

Remember me? Raiders face Broncos with offensive architect on other sideline

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AP

Remember me? Raiders face Broncos with offensive architect on other sideline

ALAMEDA – Raiders offensive coordinator Todd Downing is running a system Bill Musgrave installed in 2015.

Downing has put his stamp on it since being promoted from quarterbacks coach last winter and certainly has a different play calling style, but he didn’t burn it to the ground and start fresh.

“Honestly tweak-wise, there’s not a lot of tweaks,” Raiders quarterback Derek Carr said. “Game plan wise and things, we do things a little different. We call things differently now obviously because he’s in the division. But route concept-wise and things like that, we do a lot of the same similar stuff. Any time there’s a change, a coach is always going to have their tweaks.”

Even so, Musgrave might feel like he’s looking into a mirror Sunday afternoon when the Raiders play Denver at Oakland Coliseum. He’ll watch his offense work from the other sideline, calling plays from Mike McCoy’s selections.

This odd arrangement stems from Jack Del Rio’s decision to let Musgrave’s contract expire after two years as Raiders offensive coordinator. He promoted the in-demand Downing to that post, which left Musgrave to gain employment as Denver’s quarterbacks coach. He was promoted to OC on Monday, when McCoy got fired after Denver lost its sixth straight.

Fans didn't love Musgrave when he was in Oakland. They long for him now. The Raiders ranked sixth in total offense and seventh in scoring last year. Now they're 21st and 20th, respectively, in those categories. 

Having Musgrave calling plays for the enemy adds some intrigue to the matchup, though this isn’t a mentor-protégé matchup. Count Scott Linehan and Mike Tice as Downing’s primary professors. Those influences stand out most in Downing’s style, but Musgrave’s influence as a play caller exists in a small dose.

“I think there are elements of it. I won’t say personality traits, but maybe nuances of the game that you naturally talk to through as a coordinator and quarterback coach,” Downing said. “So, those experiences are kind of lived through the other coordinator. We were together for two years. I have some other influences that probably shape my play calling more than that.”

There’s a high level of respect between the two men, and Downing certainly appreciates his time working under Musgrave.

“He’s a very detailed guy. He likes to simplify and let the guys go execute. That was certainly something that I respected about the way he went through a game plan process. If there was something that wasn’t working itself out through the course of the practice week, we’d eliminate it or not run it on Sunday. Definitely picked that up.

“He has a broad scope understanding of offense. Being a quarterback as he is, or a former quarterback as he is, he’s not just a pass game guy. He has a good understanding of the run game and a good respect for the guys upfront being able to move the line of scrimmage. Definitely something that I admire and wanted to emulate.”

Downing and Musgrave won’t face each other directly. That’ll be new Raiders play caller John Pagano.

He took over Tuesday after Ken Norton’s firing, but doesn’t mean he’s new to the matchup. Pagano was the Chargers' defensive coordinator from 2012-16, and faced Musgrave twice a year the past two seasons. Musgrave won every matchup.

Pagano might look at Denver’s scheme and Musgrave’s tendencies when trying to silence the Broncos on Sunday.

“You always have to understand what he’s about and what little things pop into my head from seeing him, but you still have to go based off of what you’re seeing right now, the film that you’re seeing, the plays you’re going off of,” Pagano said. “You have to be prepared for everything. He does a great job and he always has those guys ready to play and there is always going to be something new.”