Arizona Coyotes

Sharks battle, Coyotes grind out the win

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USATSI

Sharks battle, Coyotes grind out the win

BOX SCORE

SAN JOSE -- Alex Goligoski scored in his third straight game to help the Arizona Coyotes beat the San Jose Sharks 2-1 on Tuesday night.

Goligoski also extended his streak of games in which he's at least one point to five. He has seven points over that stretch. The Coyotes have won three of their last four games and have consecutive wins for just the second time since Nov. 18.

Arizona upset a Sharks team scrambling to make the playoffs and in desperate need of a win. San Jose lost for the third time in five games.

The Sharks, coming off consecutive come-from-behind wins against Edmonton and Anaheim, were looking for a season sweep of Arizona.

San Jose had its chances. The Sharks outshot Arizona 41-28 and were 0 for 5 on power plays.

Goligoski scored his eighth goal on a power play that broke a 1-1 tie at 9:35 of the second period. He fired a slap shot from behind the penalty circle past Sharks goalie Martin Jones, 23 seconds after Logan Couture was called for holding.

The Coyotes took an early lead at 7:58 of the first on Kevin Connauton fifth goal. With a collision in front of the goal, Connauton drove the puck past Jones.

San Jose tied it shortly afterwards as Mikkel Boeddeker redirected a Justin Braun slapshot from inside the blue line at 9:20 of the first. With his back to the goal, Boeddeker elevated the puck high into the net past Wedgewood's right shoulder for his eighth goal.

NOTES

Coyotes: Coyotes goalie Scott Wedgewood left the game early in the third period after a collision with Timo MeierAntti Raanta, the regular starter on an off day off after a 37-save game in Monday's 6-1 victory over the Chicago Blackhawks, finished the game for Arizona. Wedgewood had 29 saves and Raanta had 12.

Sharks: Jannik Hansen was promoted from the fourth to third line, swapping roles with Melker Karlsson. . D Tim Heed and F Brandon Mashinter were called up from the AHL San Jose Barracudas. F Tomas Hertl left the game in the first quarter after crashing into the boards on a short-handed scoring chance.

UP NEXT

Coyotes: Open a seven-game homestand on Thursday against Montreal.

Sharks: Play at Vancouver on Thursday.

Sharks tie game in final seconds, pull out dramatic OT win over Coyotes

Sharks tie game in final seconds, pull out dramatic OT win over Coyotes

BOX SCORE

SAN JOSE -- It all happened in a flash amid a scramble in front of the goal, and Marc-Edouard Vlasic didn't want to dwell on the details - like whether he actually touched the puck on the winning goal.

It was no matter.

Vlasic was credited with an overtime goal as the San Jose Sharks beat the Arizona Coyotes 6-5 on Saturday night.

Joonas Donskoi tied it with 15.4 seconds left for the Sharks with his second goal of the game, and Vlasic followed with his fifth of the season amid a scramble in front.

"Why would you ask that?" Vlasic said when asked if he touched the puck.

"Lucky bounce," Vlasic said. "It popped up, I crashed the net and I was lucky enough to poke it in."

Coyotes goalie Scott Edgewood offered a different version of events.

"I kicked my legs out and they had two guys coming in hard and it glanced of (Coyotes center Christian) Dvorak's skate," Edgewood said.

"We got beat by a bounce off our own skate," Arizona center Derek Stepan said.

Donskoi scored with San Jose goalie Aaron Dell pulled for an extra skater after Arizona scored twice earlier in the period. Vlasic scored with an assist from Joe Thornton, who had a goal and two helpers to move ahead of Hall of Famer Adam Oates for 17th on the career scoring list (1,420 points).

Joe Pavelski and Logan Couture also scored for San Jose, and Dell stopped 13 of 15 shots after replacing Martin Jonesin net.

"I hadn't scored in a while, so it was nice to get a couple tonight and I hope I can score more goals in the future," Donskoi said.

The Sharks were coming off a bye week and hadn't played since Jan. 7. They'd lost three straight and four of their last five going into Saturday.

"First game back, it took a while to find our legs but we found a way to win," Vlasic said. "It's all about getting points."

Arizona got goals from Stepan, Alex GoligoskiChristian FischerOliver Ekman-Larsson and Josh Archibald. Wedgewood made 38 saves.

Thornton opened the scoring at 5:53 of a frantic first period in which the teams combined for six goals. Pavelski and Couture also scored then for San Jose, while Stepan, Goligoski and Fischer combined to make it 3-3 at the first intermission.

Donskoi scored his ninth of the season late in the second period, but then Ekman-Larsson and Archibald scored early in the third to make it 5-4 Coyotes.

NOTES:
Arizona has lost five of six. ... Thornton has 85 points against the Coyotes in 22 games, more than he has against any other team. ... Arizona F Zac Rinaldo was back in the lineup for the first time after a six-game suspension for a blindside punch to Colorado's Samuel Girard. Coach Rick Tocchet scratched C Nick Cousins to make room for Rinaldo. ... San Jose F Mikkel Boedker, a healthy scratch in the team's last game before its break on Jan. 7, was back in the lineup. ... D Dylan DeMelo, out with flu symptoms, is expected to come off injured reserve for Monday's game against the Los Angeles Kings.

UP NEXT:
Coyotes: Host the Sharks on Tuesday night.

Sharks: Play at Los Angeles on Monday.

The trade the Sharks and Coyotes should have made

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AP/USATSI

The trade the Sharks and Coyotes should have made

The San Jose Sharks and Arizona Coyotes both had their CBA-mandated ‘bye week’ this past week, but the Desert Dogs were far busier during their time off.

On Thursday, the Coyotes acquired winger Richard Panik and defenseman Laurent Dauphin from Chicago. Leaving Arizona were 22-year-old forward Anthony Duclair, as well as minor-league defenseman minor league defenseman Adam Clendening.

Duclair’s departure from the Pacific division, not Panik’s presence in it, most affects the Sharks. That’s not because he’s been particularly successful against San Jose, since Duclair has not scored a single point in nine career games as a Sharks opponent.

Instead, San Jose should lament the Duclair deal as one they did not get done.

He would have fit well on a team desperately needing speed and youth as the league trends in each direction. San Jose will never be mistaken for the league’s fastest group, and they’re already the fifth-oldest, according to The Athletic.

Only Kevin Labanc and Timo Meier are younger than Duclair, who could have given the Sharks another (baby) face in their emerging youth movement. The same cannot be said of the other players San Jose’s been linked to.

Evander Kane, for example, is 26, and half-a-season away from unrestricted free agency. Meanwhile, Duclair will become a restricted free agent this summer, and is (at the earliest) three seasons away from becoming an unrestricted one.

That kind of cost certainty will become increasingly important to the Sharks, and soon. Martin Jones and Marc-Edouard Vlasic will see their new deals kick in next season, while Logan Couture and Joe Pavelski are eligible to sign new contract extensions.

Tomas Hertl and Chris Tierney are restricted free agents this summer, while Labanc and Meier will need new deals after next season. San Jose should still have space to spend, but that’s a sizeable commitment as is.

In other words, a pending free agent like Kane will be hard to retain. Meanwhile, acquiring a player with term on their deal, such as Ottawa’s Mike Hoffman and Montreal’s Max Pacioretty, means the Sharks would not only give up more trade assets, but future flexibility.

For good reason, it didn’t take as much for Chicago to acquire Duclair as it would have to trade for those other players. He’s coming off of a 15-point season, and has only scored 20 goals once so far in his career.

Plus, there are concerns about what drove Duclair to request a trade in the first place. Duclair told Chicago reporters that he “felt like [he] needed a change of scenery” and that he “didn’t have the leash others had” in the desert.

Arizona general manager John Chayka, for his part, told AZ Central “the team wasn’t particularly happy with the player and the player wasn’t particularly happy with the team.” Given San Jose head coach Peter DeBoer’s shorter leash for young players at times, it’s fair to wonder how Duclair would have handled a similar situation with the Sharks.

But his upside is difficult to deny, and San Jose will be hard-pressed to find another available player at the trade deadline that young and that skilled. The Sharks could’ve used Duclair this season and beyond, but now will have to turn their attention to older, pricer options.