Los Angeles Angels

Giants miss out on two-way Japanese star Ohtani

Giants miss out on two-way Japanese star Ohtani

SAN FRANCISCO -- The Giants began this week dreaming of locking up the offseason's two biggest prizes. Now it appears they've struck out twice. 

A few hours after it was reported that Giancarlo Stanton does not want to be traded to San Francisco, Shohei Ohtani finally made his decision. The Japanese superstar will sign with the Los Angeles Angels. 

The Giants met with Ohtani on Monday in Los Angeles and felt the meeting went well. Ohtani was said to have hit it off with Buster Posey, who attended the meeting alongside team executives, and the Giants presented a plan in which Ohtani could be a top-of-the-rotation starter and also get 300 to 400 at-bats in the outfield. The American League was always more likely, though, because Ohtani can be the designated hitter when he is not pitching. 

[GALLERY: The file on Shohei Ohtani]

In a statement, Ohtani's agents at CAA said he was "humbled and flattered by all the time and effort that so many teams put into their presentations and sincerely thanks them for their professionalism."

"In the end, he felt a strong connection with the Angels and believes they can best help him reach his goals in Major League Baseball," wrote Nez Balelo, Ohtani's agent. 

The Giants were hot on Ohtani as soon as it became clear he would forego hundreds of millions to come over two years early. Bobby Evans and assistant GM Jeremy Shelley visited Japan in September to scout Ohtani in person. 

Two finalists for Shohei Ohtani acquire significant pool money from Twins

shohei-ohtani-2015-pitching-ap.jpg
AP

Two finalists for Shohei Ohtani acquire significant pool money from Twins

MINNEAPOLIS -- The Seattle Mariners and Los Angeles Angels each have acquired $1 million in international bonus pool money from the Minnesota Twins, aiding their pursuit of Japanese outfielder and pitcher Shohei Ohtani.

The teams announced the deals Wednesday night. Seattle sent minor league catcher David Banuelos to Minnesota, while the Angels traded minor league outfielder Jacob Pearson to the Twins.

Seattle can now offer Ohtani $2,557,500 and Los Angeles can spend $2,315,000. The Texas Rangers have the most slot money available with $3,535,000. The Giants, Cubs, Dodgers and Padres can only spend $300,000. Seattle, Los Angeles and Texas are among seven teams believed to be in the running for Ohtani.

Minnesota had $3.07 million in bonus pool money before the trades, but it is not among the finalists in the Ohtani bidding.

Banuelos was a fifth-round draft pick this year from Long Beach State. He is considered a strong fielder and was a finalist for the Johnny Bench Award as one of the nation's top amateur catchers.

Pearson was Los Angeles' third-round selection this year.

Instant Analysis: A's beat Angels in chippy affair, end eight-game skid

Instant Analysis: A's beat Angels in chippy affair, end eight-game skid

BOX SCORE

OAKLAND — In a game that included some unusual controversy, a trace of normalcy returned for the A’s pitching staff. That paved the way to a 3-1 victory over the Los Angeles Angels that snapped Oakland’s season-high eight-game losing streak. Sean Manaea pitched into the seventh inning and tied his career high with 115 pitches. It was the kind of stabilizing effort the A’s badly needed as their starters have struggled mightily of late.

Manaea (10-9) gave up five hits and struck out six over six-plus innings, becoming just the fifth Oakland starter in the past nine games to complete more than four innings.

The A’s had just taken a 1-0 lead on Khris Davis’ 39th homer in the bottom of the fourth when tensions escalated. Rookie third baseman Matt Chapman was ejected by home plate umpire Mike Everitt when he began jawing with Angels catcher Juan Graterol as he was digging in to the box to begin his at-bat.

It wasn’t the first signal of tension in the early innings of this game, as Graterol and A’s center fielder Mark Canha exchanged words before and after Graterol went out to the mound in the second to talk to Angels starter Tyler Skaggs.

After that second-inning incident, replays showed Everitt talking to someone in the Angels dugout and the words “stealing a sign” could be heard. It appeared the Angels were accusing the A’s of stealing signs.

Sign-stealing is at the forefront of everyone’s thoughts around the game right now after the revelation of the Boston Red Sox reportedly using electronic technology in stealing signs from the New York Yankees.

At any rate, Chapman began exchanging words with Graterol in the fourth before he even saw a pitch from Angels starter Tyler Skaggs. Everett quickly got between Chapman and Graterol and then the umpire began lecturing Chapman. A few moments later, Everett ejected Chapman. Renato Nunez pinch-hit for him and took over at third base. Aside from that, the game played out in conventional fashion and clocked in at a reasonable 3 hours, 10 minutes. From that standpoint, it was different from the first two games of this three-game set, both Angels wins and both marathon extra-inning games that featured both managers making rapid-fire pitching changes with expanded bullpens at their disposal.

The A’s scored twice in the fifth to increase their lead to 3-0 on Chad Pinder’s RBI single to score Marcus Semien, and a Davis fly ball that got lost in the sun by Justin Upton for a run-scoring error. With Blake Treinen unavaialble, Chris Hatcher closed out the ninth for his first save in the American League.