Warriors

Draymond trolls Cavs with 'Quickie' shirt

Draymond trolls Cavs with 'Quickie' shirt

Last year, LeBron James exited the Cavs flight home to hoist the Larry O'Brien trophy after defeating the Warriors in Game 7 while wearing an "Ultimate Warrior" shirt. This year, it's Draymond Green's turn.

Green celebrated with fans at the Warriors Championship Parade and Rally wearing a t-shirt that read "Quickie." The "Q" is identical to the "Q" logo for the Cavaliers home -- Quicken Loans Arena. With a blue a gold theme, the shirt also features the Larry O'Brien trophy.

"The Q: That's what those guys' arena is called. And we got them out of there quickie," Green explained to Ros Gold-Onwude.

"We actually got them made in Cleveland. How about that? I'm petty. I've been waiting for a while," Green added, citing James previous barbs -- the "Ultimate Warrior" shirt and cookies at his Halloween party that were decorated with Warriors tombstones and "3-1" -- as motivation.

Though many expected a long series this year, like last year's seven-game battle, the Warriors defeated the Cavs 4-1 after jumping out to a 3-0 lead.

Green, 27, averaged 13.1 points, 9.1 rebounds, 6.5 assists, 1.8 steals, 1.6 blocks and 34.9 minutes per game during the Warriors 16-1 playoff run.

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UPDATE (Thursday at 12:25pm) -- Before the parade was even over, James posted his reponse to Instagram.

.... That's what she said, HUH?!?!? 🤔🤔😂😂.

A post shared by LeBron James (@kingjames) on

Green "liked" James' post and commented with 10 laughing-face emojis. He also responded with a post of his own...

Them dubs finally made him go bald!!! Congrats bro @kingjames

A post shared by Draymond Green (@money23green) on

Steph Curry to begin participating in modified Warriors practices

Steph Curry to begin participating in modified Warriors practices

SAN ANTONIO -- After a four-week absence from all team basketball activities, Stephen Curry will return to the practice court for specified activities Saturday.

Curry was reevaluated Friday in San Antonio and was cleared “to participate in modified team practices . . . and the intensity of his on-court rehabilitation will continue to increase,” the Warriors announced in statement released Friday afternoon.

That Curry won’t be reevaluated until next weekend implies that, should the Warriors advance out of the first round, he almost certainly will miss Game 1 of Western Conference semifinals that could begin as early as April 28.

Curry sustained a Grade 2 MCL sprain to his left knee on March 23 against the Hawks, missing the final 10 games of the regular season as well as the first three games of the first-round playoff series against the Spurs.

The examination, according to the Warriors, “indicated that Stephen continues to make consistent functional progress since the injury.”

Curry has been going through individual workouts daily, sometimes twice, in an effort to increase strength and range of motion. After the team’s shootaround on Thursday, he spent more than an hour going through light drills under the supervision of the training staff.

The typical recovery time for a Grade 2 MCL sprain is four to six weeks.

Warriors' veteran tag team made sure things stayed calm in Game 3 win vs Spurs

Warriors' veteran tag team made sure things stayed calm in Game 3 win vs Spurs

SAN ANTONIO -- The Illinois Boys don’t do flash or dash. They don’t do much thrilling or spilling, either.

They do reliable.

Andre Iguodala and Shaun Livingston do smooth hoops. They are seasoned veterans that do what it takes to make the game easier for their teammates, and the Warriors are the beneficiaries.

Both were on their games Thursday night, providing the insulation within a 110-97 victory over the San Antonio Spurs in Game 3 of their first-round series.

While Kevin Durant was leading the team and scoring and rebounding, and Draymond Green was leading in assists and blocks, and Kevon Looney was leading in steals, Iguodala and Livington were leading forces in making sure things stayed tight and together.

“It’s kind of funny how we trade off,” said Iguodala, from Springfield, Ill.

“We flip and flop,” said Livingston, from Peoria.

Iguodala played 27 minutes and made 4-of-9 shots from the field, Livingston played 20 minutes and made 4-of-9 from the field.

They combined for 26 points, 16 for Livingston and 10 for Iguodala. They combined for seven rebound and five assists. Iguodala was plus-12, Livingston plus-7.

Most important, they combined for one turnover.

On a night when the death of Erin Popovich, the wife of Spurs coach Gregg Popovich, was in the minds of all inside AT&T Center, the Warriors needed Iguodala and Livingston to be their usual steady selves.

“To have that veteran leadership in the locker room, I think it’s great,” Draymond Green said. “It was a perfect setup for a letdown . . . but we still wanted to come out and try to win the game. Having that veteran leadership to try to put that to the side, no matter what, knowing that they were going to come out on an emotional high.”

Green didn’t mention Iguodala or Livingston by name. He didn’t have to.

They are team leaders and calming influences in the locker room and on the court. And each does it quietly and without pomp.

Iguodala is 34, in his 14th season, drafted ninth overall in 2004 from the University of Arizona. Livingston is 32, in his 14th season, drafted fourth overall, out of Peoria Central High School.

Warriors coach Steve Kerr, by design, wants one of them on the court at all times.

They swapped in the first quarter, Livingston for Iguodala. They swapped in the second quarter, Iguodala for Livingston. They swapped in the third, Livingston for Iguodala and again in the fourth, Iguodala for Livingston.

“We just let the game come to us,” Livingston said.

Maybe that’s why the work they do seems so smooth and almost quiet.