Warriors

End of preseason schedule poses test for Warriors

warriors-china-redo.jpg
AP

End of preseason schedule poses test for Warriors

Not once did the Warriors complain about their obligations during a weeklong swing through China that, truth be told, they’d rather have avoided.

As splendid as they looked Sunday in a 142-110 blowout of Minnesota, the Warriors returned to Oakland with eight days to recover from jet lag from two 7,000-mile trips in seven days, fend off any lingering fatigue and have a few productive practices before taking the court Friday for their final exhibition game.

When the regular season opens Oct. 17 there will be an immediate sprint, with the retooled Houston Rockets coming to Oracle Arena.

If the Warriors start slowly, this trip logically would be a contributing factor.

The Warriors, players and coaches, conceded that the offseason felt particularly short. They opened training camp on Sept. 23, the same day as the Timberwolves, but Minnesota’s 2016-17 NBA season ended a full two months earlier.

That’s why this China trek was so challenging, even though the Warriors excelled in the role of basketball ambassadors, smiling, signing autographs and playfully engaging local fans while dragging themselves across multiple time zones. They’re the most popular team in the league, generally amiable and reigning champs. It’s obvious why the league selected them as representatives.

“It’s just counter-productive in a way,” Shaun Livingston, speaking of the journey, told reporters in Shanghai, “because of the schedule and because it’s more than just the basketball part.”

The Warriors went through this only upon request. This was not something they would have chosen to undertake, even though they’re too diplomatic to say so. They simply accepted the challenge even while aware of potential pitfalls.

“This is about a cultural experience, about sharing NBA basketball with our fans in China,” coach Steve Kerr said. “It’s a great trip, a great experience, but this is not the way to prepare for the season.

“But that’s all right. We’ll have about a week when we get back, and I’m sure we’ll be fine.”

Insofar as he coaches a team of professionals, Kerr is probably right. They will be fine. But there is no way of knowing whether that will be next week or next month. There is no knowing how long they’ll have a China hangover.

Understand, the Warriors have nothing against China or the Chinese. Some players brought their families along. The team’s four All-Stars -- Stephen Curry, Kevin Durant, Draymond Green, Klay Thompson -- make regular trips -- 15-hour flights each way -- and really seem to enjoy it.

No, this is about a team that can only hope there will be no residual effect from its second trip to China in four seasons.

This is about a team coming off three of the longest seasons in league history, the most recent ending June 12 in Game 5 of the NBA Finals.

A team that, even without a postseason, consistently ranks among the top five in air miles traveled over the course of a season.

A team that, including the postseason, has flown more miles than any other over the past three seasons.

Any NBA team spending a week of its preseason in China, or anyplace else far beyond the United States, is forced to make adjustments to its routine. The Warriors spent less time on the court than meeting team and individual commitments off it.

“It’s a huge problem,” Green told reporters. “You kind of take training camp and break it up. It’s not the norm, so I think it’s a humongous problem.

“You start to risk injury and all of those things . . . so we have a pretty professional team. Guys get their work in, but it’s still nothing like actual practicing and that tempo. It’s more a risk of injury than the season. We’ll figure it out over the season.”

Oh, they certainly will. After all, they’re the deepest, most talented team in the NBA. They’ll recover. What’s uncertain is when.

What do we make of Warriors already blowing three double-digit leads?

kerr-us.jpg
USATSI

What do we make of Warriors already blowing three double-digit leads?

Captured as we are in the amber jar of Small Sample Size Theatre, there is something about the Warriors worth chewing on as they head for Philadelphia and a date with the precocious Philadelphia 76ers Saturday evening.
 
They now seem to disregard large leads as beneath them.
 
I’m not prepared to say what this means, but three of their losses this year (out of four, of course) have featured them hurling up a double-digit lead – 17 in the second quarter and 16 in the third quarter against Houston, 
13 against Detroit and 17 in the second and third quarters against Boston Thursday night.
 
This is more games in which they have done so than all of last season, in which they blew a 14-point lead Christmas Day in Cleveland and a 17-point lead at home to Memphis 13 days later.
 
In other words, this could just be a phase they are going through as the team that knows it can produce at will and believes the other teams will cower in fear at the mere sight of their power and fold like 200-thread towels.
 
But three times in four weeks would be enough for head coach Steve Kerr to find a new way to put foot to hinder at future practices. It suggests that the Warriors, having outgrown their early weariness from a fun-filled summer (hey, they went to China and didn’t get busted for anything, so there’s that), maybe take themselves a bit for granted, and Kerr and team lecturers Draymond Green, David West and Andre Iguodala will now have something to help them all correct in Philadelphia, Brooklyn, Oklahoma City and then home again.
 
I mean, what’s the point of having a big lead if you can’t enjoy it by making it bigger and bigger? What’s the value of leading by 17 and calling it a night when you can lead by 29 and THEN put your feet up? I mean, Houston did it last night and took the whole second half off.
 
Anyway, that’s today’s Warriors Gristle – what to do when you think you’ve won enough hands and find out you haven’t. Tomorrow, we’ll touch on what they need to do about keeping those old Kevin-Durant-back-in-OKC story lines tired and repetitive.

Klay Thompson: 'I never thought I’d be on billboards and posters in China'

klay-ap.jpg
AP

Klay Thompson: 'I never thought I’d be on billboards and posters in China'

OAKLAND — Klay Thompson danced unabashedly in China after winning another NBA championship, and it got shared all over social media. He smoked a stogie on the rooftop, letting loose to reveal another side of himself.

“I didn’t plan for that video to go viral,” Thompson said matter-of-factly. “I was just having fun. I’ve always been myself and having fun while doing it and learning to enjoy every day, because it goes by so fast.”

Coming to that mindset, however, has been a process for the seventh-year Golden State guard, who acknowledges for so long he put extreme pressure on himself to be the best.

The quiet, more under-the-radar Warriors All-Star of the bunch, Thompson has provided a steadying hand early on for the reigning NBA champions who are favored to capture a third title in four years.

“I used to stress a lot more at the beginning of my career about my performance,” Thompson recalled. “Now, it’s not like I don’t stress, but I play more carefree and I’m more able, if I play as hard as I can I’m satisfied with the results. ... I used to compare myself with all players and want to be the best so badly, but now it’s all about winning and having fun and realizing basketball is more of a team sport than anything.”

After a recent practice, Thompson dazzled right alongside a couple of visiting Harlem Globetrotters, spinning the ball on his finger, rolling it up and down his arms, off his knee and then a foot soccer-style before swishing a short jumper.

“I should’ve been a Globetrotter!” he yelled.

It’s a new look for this hang-loose, beach-loving Splash Brother.

The approach is working for the Warriors.

“He still carries the threat. You have to honor him,” Orlando coach Frank Vogel said. “He’s great at making the right play. Their whole team is. I think he’s trying to fit in with their whole buy-in that ball movement and passing is greater than any one man carrying the bulk of it.”

Still, his numbers are stellar. Thompson has had a fast start this season, which previously hasn’t been the case.

Thompson credits the familiarity with teammates and a comfort in coach Steve Kerr’s offense.

“He’s taken another step in his game. Just the experience that he’s had in his career, every year he’s gotten better and I think this year he’s shown how at the end of the season he carried it over to the beginning of this year,” backcourt mate Stephen Curry said. “Historically he hadn’t started seasons well but this year he’s locked in. He’s obviously shooting the ball well and playing great defense, but I think the biggest thing is his playmaking in situations where he’s drawing a crowd. He’s making great decisions setting guys up and just playing under control for the most part this entire season.”

Life off the court is great for Thompson, too, and that helps him be stress-free on it.

Look closely, and it’s easy to see he has come out of his shell.

On a day off last week, he golfed a popular public course close to Oracle Arena. Thompson signed someone’s toaster last spring, and it became a superstition.

In July, he threw out the ceremonial first pitch at an Oakland Athletics game, then drove an IndyCar in September while serving as Grand Marshal of a series stop in Sonoma.

Thompson shares his training tricks on social media and posts photos with his bulldog, Rocco.

He recently donated $75,000 to relief efforts in the aftermath of the devastating Northern California wildfires, committing $1,000 per point for a three-game stretch during which he scored 69 points — but added to that total.

He is a spokesman for chocolate milk and an obscure — in the U.S. anyway — Chinese shoe company. He signed an $80 million, 10-year extension to wear the sneakers.

“Life’s good,” Thompson said. “I never thought I’d get paid millions of dollars to wear shoes and apparel. I’m very proud to be a part of Anta. ... It’s so cool that I’m big in China. I never thought I’d be on billboards and posters in China.”

Thompson has found a balance during the offseason to stay sharp, mixing up his workouts with outdoor activities he enjoys.

“It took years for me to figure out how to prepare the best I can for the season. I finally learned in my sixth year,” he said. “You’ve got to stay in shape almost year-round because as you get older it’s harder to get back into shape. It’s easier to get out of shape than it is to get back into shape. I do other things besides basketball to stay in shape in the offseason. I think that just keeps my mind fresh.”

He hopes to do a formal swim from Alcatraz, or even a triathlon. He swims in the ocean — “my favorite place in the world” — whenever he can. Freestyle is his strength, butterfly not so much. He plays hours of beach volleyball or just throws the football around and runs routes through the sand.

At work, he has been a model of consistency. Thompson is determined to be a better passer, creating for teammates whenever possible. He also usually guards the opponent’s top perimeter scorer.

Thompson is off to his best shooting season ever, with career highs of 49.4 percent shooting from the field and 45.6 percent on 3-pointers.

“I think his playmaking has been the best it’s been in his career,” Kerr said. “He’s really doing a good job of putting the ball on the floor and moving it on, drive and kick game, finding the centers in the pocket for little floaters. ... It’s been his best passing season so far.”

Thompson used to get teased for his lack of assists, and it remains a running joke.

“I got thick skin,” Thompson quipped, “honestly I don’t really care.”

That carefree approach has taken time, and the Warriors are better for it.