Warriors

'Flopping' is symptom, blockcharge the disease

796696.jpg

'Flopping' is symptom, blockcharge the disease

Apparently, NBA commissioner David Stern along with thecompetition committee is prepared to address the issue of flopping, thepractice of deceiving officials by faking contact and falling down.That approach, however, is called addressing the symptom andnot the disease.How about this instead: Start calling the blockcharge theway it should be called. Problem solved. Competition committee meetingadjourned.Lets be clear: Flopping is an issue right now in the NBA,and every fan should be for stopping it. Its beginning to undermine thegame.But the fact of the matter is that flopping has become moreprevalent because officials with a mandate from the league are beingordered to call the blockcharge in such a way as to reward a defender who isnot playing defense the right way or within the rules.Get that straight, and flopping will take care ofitself.Over the past decade or so give or take it has beenmind-boggling to me why a league that wants to highlight athleticism andincrease scoring actually values less athletic types who sometimes serve littleother function than to undercut (word chosen purposefully) the games mostgifted players.Thats right, Im talking about you Eduardo Najera, ShaneBattier, Anderson Varejao and Glenn Davis. Youre better than that.First off, there is absolutely a place for the charge callin the NBA, and, to me, it is when an offensive player is out of control or withlittle place to go, and a defensive player is occupying a spot before thatplayer makes contact.Taking a charge should be something that a defensive playeranticipates not something he does when hes got no other options to prevent ascore.Too often were seeing defenders slide in late orangling their bodies in order to further exacerbate contact.That usually results in some kind of collision, with bodieson the floor, and, unfortunately, more often than not, a charge call. There isnothing worse in the NBA than watching one of the leagues elite athletes aKevin Durant, LeBron James, Kobe Bryant, or whomever drive to the basket andbegin to make a creative move, only to have a secondary defender impede theirprogress and force contact by moving into their path.Again, there is a difference between an interior defenderanticipating a drive to a certain area and a defender sliding in the lastsplit-second or late. And NBA officials are good enough to tell thedifference.The bottom line is that if a blockcharge is close, itshould be a block. Period. There should be two or three block calls for everycharge, and right now it seems about the opposite of that.When you put two and two together you realize that playershave figured out that they often can draw charges when they dont deserve them,and theyre taking it further and further. Eventually, the issue has morphedinto flopping. But again, thats the symptom.If the league were serious about stopping flopping, theydfirst address the blockcharge. And then theyd get right to shot-blocking because shot-blocking is something that the NBA should encourage, not takingcharges.The NBA should allow more contact up high. In other words,when a player is going to the bucket, and he elevates, defenders should begiven more leeway when leaving the ground to challenge that shot.Allow for contact after the ball is released, forexample.Contrary to what some may believe, this will not lead to moredangerous play or more injuries. When two players are elevating and there is alittle contact up high, each player is pretty much in the same positionvulnerability-wise. And chances are, because the contact will be mostlyhandwristforearm (perhaps), youre less likely to get awkward falls.When players slide in late to take charges, there is littledoubt that the defender on the floor is in a far safer position and theoffensive player is at the height of vulnerability.If Stern and the competition committee get their way, floppingwill be a thing of the past in 2012-13. But the real problem the currentinterpretation of the blockcharge call will live on.

Kerr: Nick Young vs Pat McCaw 'hasn't crystalized at all for me'

young-nick-tongue.jpg
USATI

Kerr: Nick Young vs Pat McCaw 'hasn't crystalized at all for me'

Programming note: Warriors-Mavs coverage starts today at 4:30pm with Warriors Pregame Live on NBC Sports Bay Area.

In the Warriors' win over the Pelicans on Friday night, Pat McCaw did not get any playing time.

Nick Young was on the floor for 11 minutes.

"The way I look at Nick and Patrick -- I don't think either one has won the job, backup two," Kerr said after the game. "So I may play Pat tomorrow, I don't know. We'll figure it out.

"They're both gonna play, and there are gonna be nights where one of 'em may not get in."

On Saturday night against the Grizzlies, Young was -3 in five minutes and missed both of his 3-point attempts.

McCaw recorded two assists and a steal but he was -9 in 12 minutes.

Following shootaround on Monday in Dallas, Kerr said the following:

Sounds like this is going to be a point of discussion for the foreseeable future...

Drew Shiller is the co-host of Warriors Outsiders and a Web Producer at NBC Sports Bay Area. Follow him on Twitter @DrewShiller

Steph Curry golfs with Barack Obama, Jordan Spieth in Dallas

curry-steph-obama-spieth-golf.jpg
Instagram/jordanspieth

Steph Curry golfs with Barack Obama, Jordan Spieth in Dallas

Programming note: Warriors-Mavs coverage starts today at 4:30pm with Warriors Pregame Live on NBC Sports Bay Area.

After the Warriors lost to the Grizzlies on Saturday night in Memphis, they flew to Dallas.

And on Sunday in the Lone Star State, Steph Curry enjoyed some free time on the golf course:

🇺🇸

A post shared by Jordan Spieth (@jordanspieth) on

From left to right -- Jonnie West, Seth Curry, Kevin Plank (Under Armour CEO), Jordan Spieth, Barack Obama, Curry.

This is not the first time Curry has enjoyed a round of golf with Obama, as the two hit the links back in August 2015.

"My third time actually, so it's old news," Curry joked after shootaround on Monday. "We're always teammates. We're 2-1 now. Much better record than the Warriors."

What was Obama like?

"Same personality, same kind of charisma and vibe around him," Curry said. "Just maybe two or three less secret service members."

Curry and the Warriors face the Mavs on Monday night.

Seth Curry unfortunately will not suit up because of a left leg injury.

Drew Shiller is the co-host of Warriors Outsiders and a Web Producer at NBC Sports Bay Area. Follow him on Twitter @DrewShiller