Warriors

Here's to Tim Hardaway

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Here's to Tim Hardaway

It was Tim Hardaway bobble-head night at Oracle Arena onMonday night. In a lead-up to the Chris Mullin jersey retirement ceremony onMarch 19, the Warriors are doing the bobble-head thing with Hardaway, MitchRichmond and, of course, Mullin: "Run TMC.".When I get to thinking of Tim Hardaway, I think of a playerwho was relentless, tough and fearless. Few guards took the ball to the hole ashard as Hardaway did.His killer crossover is what many people will remember,but on the end of that move was usually a finish in the lane, sometimes intraffic and a lot of the time in head-shaking fashion.
Hardaway had four seasons with the Warriors in which heaveraged over 20 points and nine assists per game. When he got it going asthey say, he was virtually unguardable.He was a player who could get his shot when he needed to.You couldnt defend him tightly on the perimeter because hed just go by you,and so he always had a makeable 20-footer at hand.He was a fierce competitor, and he had a great love for thegame-within-the game. And that meant his head-to-head matchup with the opposingpoint guards.When Hardaway got scored on, chances were he was coming rightback at the guy. Hardaway was a player who didnt just want to win, he wantedto win two things: the game and his matchup.As competitive as Hardaway was, he almost always did his jobwith a smile on his face and in, lets just say, a vocal way. He was atremendous talker on the court but yet always seemed to do it in agood-natured way. Hardaway was the essence of a scoring point guard. He wasnot a consistent outside shooter, but he was good enough and he could bestreaky. Truth be told, Hardaway didnt have to be a great perimeter shooterbecause, in his prime, he got to the basket whenever he wanted.The other thing to remember about Hardaway is this: As goodas he was as a Warrior, he was every bit as good after he got traded to theMiami Heat. Hardaway had a whole nother career after leaving Golden State, andtruth be told, a better one certainly from a team standpoint.And its a big reason why the Heat have retired Hardaways No.10 jersey.

Is there a scenario where Bob Myers could leave Warriors? 'It would be...'

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USATSI

Is there a scenario where Bob Myers could leave Warriors? 'It would be...'

OAKLAND -- When the Boston Red Sox waved a $12.5 million offer in front of Billy Beane back in 2002, there were moments when the A’s architect and “Moneyball” protagonist considered moving to Massachusetts.

Citing family and quality of life, Beane ultimately stayed in Oakland and was rewarded with a small percentage of the team.

Should the day come when an NBA owner reaches out to Warriors general manager Bob Myers, it might be even tougher to pry him out of the Bay Area.

A guest on the NBC Sports Bay Area Warriors Insider Podcast this week, Myers was asked if he’s wondered what it would take for him to work for another team.

“It’s not really a money thing. It’s too hard to think of . . . to get to be the general manager of the team you grew up around is kind of surreal,” he said. “It’s hard to make sense of. In some ways it’s amazing and all the positive adjectives you can find. But in other ways it’s kind of consuming. You feel like it’s too much.

“So leaving wouldn’t be because I didn’t like the job. It would be that it meant too much. Sometimes in life . . . you’ve got to still keep your balance.”

There isn’t a lot of balance these days. Myers sweats the details, the games and the negotiations. He’s a 6-foot-7 tower of worry even as the Warriors have gone to three consecutive NBA Finals, winning two, in becoming an American sensation and global phenomenon.

If the East Bay native should feel the itch, there would be no shortage of teams seeking his services. The Lakers reportedly were interested until 13 months ago, when Myers received a promotion to president of basketball operations that came with a pay raise and a contract extension believed to go through 2019-20.

“Happiness means a lot,” Myers said. “And that’s what I think about every day. Am I fulfilled? Am I happy? I think about my family. I think about my kids. And maybe some things that have happened to me and my wife and her family that have made me think a little differently.”

To be sure, Myers was profoundly affected by the September 2016 sudden death of his friend and brother-in-law Scott Dinsmore during a mountain-climbing accident. His sense of family was immediately fortified.

It appears burnout might be the biggest threat to Myers running the Warriors for as long as CEO Joe Lacob allows.

“The challenge would be like, ‘Can I give this team what it deserves in the role that I’m in, and give this community and fan base what they deserve and sustain that?’ ” Myers said. “Now I can. I love it. And I think I can keep doing it for a long time, hopefully.”

Health issues put Kerr extension on back burner: 'I want to keep coaching, but...'

Health issues put Kerr extension on back burner: 'I want to keep coaching, but...'

OAKLAND -- Despite two NBA titles and the best three-season record of any coach in league history, Warriors coach Steve Kerr enters Year 4 of a five-year deal worth $25 million without a contract extension.

Though the topic has been raised, it is not currently a priority for general manager Bob Myers or Kerr, mostly because the coach is focusing on personal health issues.

“I’m just not ready to look that far ahead,” Kerr said Sunday.

“It’s not top of mind because I just can’t envision him not being our coach,” Myers said on the Warriors Insider Podcast this week. “If something happened health related, that’s different. But if it’s his option or our option to work something out, I’m really confident that it won’t be an issue -- for him or for us.”

Because he continues to experience lingering symptoms, including headaches and dizziness, related to multiple back surgeries two years ago, Kerr said his first personal objective is finding a path to a pain-free life.

Kerr missed 43 games at the beginning of the 2015-16 season and 11 more during the 2017 postseason. His health is trending upward, he says, but it’s a slow progression and a time-consuming process.

If Kerr, who is 207-39 through three seasons, is willing to wait, so are the Warriors.

“There’s no secret of our admiration for Steve, not only ours in the organization, whether it’s ownership or myself and the front office, but that trickles up from our players,” said Myers, who 13 months ago received an extension believed to last through 2019-20. “He’s universally kind of beloved in the organization for his ability to coach, for his ability to lead, his humanity -- all the skills.”

Kerr, 51, said he is determined to avoid putting himself or the team in a situation where he signs a new deal and then discovers shortly afterward that he is unable to physically meet the demands of the job.

That doesn’t mean he hasn’t thought about being with the Warriors -- and only the Warriors -- beyond the contract that ends in 2019, the year the team moves into the new Chase Center in San Francisco.

“I know I enjoy coaching and that I want to keep coaching,” said Kerr, voted Coach of the Year in 2015-16. “But it’s impossible to know if I’ll be in the position to do so.”