Warriors

Klay Thompson: 'I never thought I’d be on billboards and posters in China'

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AP

Klay Thompson: 'I never thought I’d be on billboards and posters in China'

OAKLAND — Klay Thompson danced unabashedly in China after winning another NBA championship, and it got shared all over social media. He smoked a stogie on the rooftop, letting loose to reveal another side of himself.

“I didn’t plan for that video to go viral,” Thompson said matter-of-factly. “I was just having fun. I’ve always been myself and having fun while doing it and learning to enjoy every day, because it goes by so fast.”

Coming to that mindset, however, has been a process for the seventh-year Golden State guard, who acknowledges for so long he put extreme pressure on himself to be the best.

The quiet, more under-the-radar Warriors All-Star of the bunch, Thompson has provided a steadying hand early on for the reigning NBA champions who are favored to capture a third title in four years.

“I used to stress a lot more at the beginning of my career about my performance,” Thompson recalled. “Now, it’s not like I don’t stress, but I play more carefree and I’m more able, if I play as hard as I can I’m satisfied with the results. ... I used to compare myself with all players and want to be the best so badly, but now it’s all about winning and having fun and realizing basketball is more of a team sport than anything.”

After a recent practice, Thompson dazzled right alongside a couple of visiting Harlem Globetrotters, spinning the ball on his finger, rolling it up and down his arms, off his knee and then a foot soccer-style before swishing a short jumper.

“I should’ve been a Globetrotter!” he yelled.

It’s a new look for this hang-loose, beach-loving Splash Brother.

The approach is working for the Warriors.

“He still carries the threat. You have to honor him,” Orlando coach Frank Vogel said. “He’s great at making the right play. Their whole team is. I think he’s trying to fit in with their whole buy-in that ball movement and passing is greater than any one man carrying the bulk of it.”

Still, his numbers are stellar. Thompson has had a fast start this season, which previously hasn’t been the case.

Thompson credits the familiarity with teammates and a comfort in coach Steve Kerr’s offense.

“He’s taken another step in his game. Just the experience that he’s had in his career, every year he’s gotten better and I think this year he’s shown how at the end of the season he carried it over to the beginning of this year,” backcourt mate Stephen Curry said. “Historically he hadn’t started seasons well but this year he’s locked in. He’s obviously shooting the ball well and playing great defense, but I think the biggest thing is his playmaking in situations where he’s drawing a crowd. He’s making great decisions setting guys up and just playing under control for the most part this entire season.”

Life off the court is great for Thompson, too, and that helps him be stress-free on it.

Look closely, and it’s easy to see he has come out of his shell.

On a day off last week, he golfed a popular public course close to Oracle Arena. Thompson signed someone’s toaster last spring, and it became a superstition.

In July, he threw out the ceremonial first pitch at an Oakland Athletics game, then drove an IndyCar in September while serving as Grand Marshal of a series stop in Sonoma.

Thompson shares his training tricks on social media and posts photos with his bulldog, Rocco.

He recently donated $75,000 to relief efforts in the aftermath of the devastating Northern California wildfires, committing $1,000 per point for a three-game stretch during which he scored 69 points — but added to that total.

He is a spokesman for chocolate milk and an obscure — in the U.S. anyway — Chinese shoe company. He signed an $80 million, 10-year extension to wear the sneakers.

“Life’s good,” Thompson said. “I never thought I’d get paid millions of dollars to wear shoes and apparel. I’m very proud to be a part of Anta. ... It’s so cool that I’m big in China. I never thought I’d be on billboards and posters in China.”

Thompson has found a balance during the offseason to stay sharp, mixing up his workouts with outdoor activities he enjoys.

“It took years for me to figure out how to prepare the best I can for the season. I finally learned in my sixth year,” he said. “You’ve got to stay in shape almost year-round because as you get older it’s harder to get back into shape. It’s easier to get out of shape than it is to get back into shape. I do other things besides basketball to stay in shape in the offseason. I think that just keeps my mind fresh.”

He hopes to do a formal swim from Alcatraz, or even a triathlon. He swims in the ocean — “my favorite place in the world” — whenever he can. Freestyle is his strength, butterfly not so much. He plays hours of beach volleyball or just throws the football around and runs routes through the sand.

At work, he has been a model of consistency. Thompson is determined to be a better passer, creating for teammates whenever possible. He also usually guards the opponent’s top perimeter scorer.

Thompson is off to his best shooting season ever, with career highs of 49.4 percent shooting from the field and 45.6 percent on 3-pointers.

“I think his playmaking has been the best it’s been in his career,” Kerr said. “He’s really doing a good job of putting the ball on the floor and moving it on, drive and kick game, finding the centers in the pocket for little floaters. ... It’s been his best passing season so far.”

Thompson used to get teased for his lack of assists, and it remains a running joke.

“I got thick skin,” Thompson quipped, “honestly I don’t really care.”

That carefree approach has taken time, and the Warriors are better for it.

One moment in win over Trail Blazers epitomizes Jordan Bell

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USATSI

One moment in win over Trail Blazers epitomizes Jordan Bell

OAKLAND -- Jordan Bell won’t be named the NBA’s Rookie of the Year, but he’s probably matching Philadelphia’s Ben Simmons highlight for highlight.

Bell won’t be named to the league’s All-Defensive team, either, but you won’t find another rookie defending at his level. He’s a second-round pick, 38th overall, making a case for the All-Rookie team.

He won’t win a spot in the Warriors starting lineup this season. But over the last five weeks, Bell has evolved from occasionally being relegated to the inactive list to earning semi-regular minutes to becoming a very valuable member of the bench.

And his coach, Steve Kerr, also has evolved from benching Bell for learning purposes to saying he deserves more minutes to, this week, announcing that the forward/center is been “outstanding” in his rookie season.

The latest examples came Monday night, in a 111-104 win over Portland. With Draymond Green sitting out due to sore right shoulder, Kerr inserted Bell into the lineup for his third start. His numbers were excellent: 11 points on 5-of-6 shooting, six rebounds, two assists and one block over 26 minutes. He was plus-14, best of anyone on the team.

But, as often is the case, Bell’s performance includes moments that astound the observer. In this instance it’s a third-quarter chase-down block of a layup by Blazers star Damian Lillard, the trailer on a two-on-one fast break.

Bell, who concedes that his bad-pass turnover triggered the Portland break, immediately remembers a sequence last week in New Orleans, where a Warriors turnover gave the Pelicans a three-on-one break.

“They missed, got the rebound again and missed again,” he recalled. “I was just standing there and coach was like, ‘Get down there. You’re a rookie. That’s how you have to be successful on this team. You have to play hard.’

“I was about to walk down. And then I was like, ‘Oh, I’m going to get taken out.’ So I just ran down and happened to be in the right place.”

It’s one of several highlight plays for the Warriors. No, it was more than that.

“That chase-down block after the turnover was spectacular,” said Kevin Durant, who drained a jumper seven seconds after the block. “That play kind of got us going.”

If Lillard makes the layup, it trims the Warriors lead to nine, 66-57, with 9:32 left in the quarter.

Instead, with Oracle Arena roaring and the team energized, the Warriors turn up the energy and, less than three minutes later, have a 21-point lead, 80-59.

That moment represents Bell perfectly. The 6-foot-8 Oregon product commited a rookie mistake, and then neutralized it with a play very few players can make.

“That’s the tradeoff,” Kerr said. “We’re trying to bring Jordan along slowly, but he makes it hard to keep him off the floor. We’re pointing out his mistakes and trying to teach him about the NBA game and his opponents, who he’s guarding and what to expect. It comes at you fast as a rookie. From one night to the next you’ve got all these star players and tendencies you have to learn, and coverages and terminology.

“He’s coming along really well. He’s been outstanding for us.”

Bell’s 21.56 player-efficiency rating is fourth among the Warriors but first among all rookies. It’s ahead of such power forwards as Boston’s Al Horford and Orlando’s Aaron Gordon. Bell’s 1.65 plus-minus mark is third among rookies, behind Simmons and Boston’s Jayson Tatum, both of whom start.

Bell’s ratings are somewhat skewed because he’s a reserve playing shorter minutes -- he’s averaging 11.3 minutes per game, but 14.7 minutes over the last 10 -- but he’s making more of an impact, on a better team, than some lottery picks.

Bell’s defensive rating (98.6) is 30th among all players averaging at least 10 minutes per game but leads all rookies at that level. He’s comfortable switching onto star guards, such as CJ McCollum and Lillard, and is able to shut them down.

“That’s kind of his forte,” Kerr said. “That’s what we liked about him coming out of Oregon, was the ability to switch out onto guards and (also) protect the rim. It’s a very unique skill, kind of a Draymond Green-like skill. It’s a required one in the modern NBA with all these little guards shooting 28-footers and then penetrating and the floor (being) spaced. You have to have that speed and athleticism and versatility. Jordan’s got that.”

For someone who didn’t play much basketball until high school at Long Beach Poly High, Bell has a remarkable feel for the game, impeccable timing and a stunning ability to react as a play is developing.

And now he’s picking the brains of such veterans as Andre Iguodala, David West, Zaza Pachulia and, of course, Green, who is Bell’s personal Yoda.

Whatever they’re telling Bell, it seems he’s able to apply. He’s a quick learner, as Lillard discovered Monday night.

“I knew we drafted a guy that was ready to play,” Klay Thompson said. “He spent three years in college and has an NBA body and is great athlete. He just keeps it simple and that’s why he’s so good.”

Steve Kerr offers insight into why Draymond Green is sitting vs Blazers

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AP

Steve Kerr offers insight into why Draymond Green is sitting vs Blazers

OAKLAND -- The Warriors made it clear Sunday that Stephen Curry would not be available Monday night against Portland, and they announced Monday morning that Zaza Pachulia also would miss the game.

Not until two hours before tipoff against the Blazers was it announced that forward Draymond Green, who had been listed as probable, also would not be available.

Warriors coach Steve Kerr studied video of the Blazers’ last game, considered their available playing rotation and decided Green’s tender right shoulder could benefit from a night off.

“That’s a big part of it,” Kerr said in his pregame news conference. “I watched their Houston game from other day. It looked like the old 6-5 and Under League. Lots of shooting, lots of spacing. They’re hard to guard. They run good stuff.

“So we’ve got to stay home with shooters and cover penetration. You’ll see our lineups reflect that.”

Green missed the game last Wednesday in Charlotte but returned, at less than full strength, to play last Friday at Detroit, his home state. Though he had a highly productive game, the Warriors don’t want to push the issue.

“I don’t think it’s serious,” Kerr said. “It’s enough to keep him from playing tonight. It’s been bothering him the last few days and it’s still aggravated, so we won’t play him tonight.”