NBA-best Warriors still searching for right balance between risk and reward

NBA-best Warriors still searching for right balance between risk and reward

OAKLAND -- Warriors coach Steve Kerr and his assistants consistently preach one particular message to the entire roster, and the players have heard it so often they preach it to each other.

And yet there are times when they’re unable to practice what is preached.

It’s uncommon for the Warriors to fall apart, but when they do it’s usually by their own hand. It’s death by turnovers -- the very topic of the sermon.

“Our biggest issue is taking care of the ball,” veteran big man David West tells CSNBayArea.com. “We’ve got to be able to take care of the basketball for long periods of time.”

Among the NBA’s 30 teams, the Warriors rank 24th in turnovers. That’s better than the Hawks and the Nuggets. It’s worse than the Timberwolves or Pelicans or Lakers.

Practicing ball care, thereby limiting turnovers, can be challenging with such a skilled roster and players who really enjoy opportunities to shine. From Stephen Curry to Draymond Green, from Kevin Durant to Klay Thompson, from Zaza Pachulia to JaVale McGee, the Warriors like to entertain while winning.

To do that Monday afternoon against Cavaliers is to tempt fate. The Warriors learned that much on Christmas Day, when six turnovers in the fourth quarter, leading to 10 Cleveland points, fostered a startling Cavs rally that overcame a 14-point Warriors lead.

“When we look at that game -- and we’ve talked about it -- it just comes down to ball care and decision-making,” West says. “If we do that, we’ll be in good shape. If we don’t, then we give up a fourth-quarter lead against one the best teams in the NBA.”

It’s a hard pattern to break. The Warriors will go two or three or four games with a low turnover total, and then cough it up 16 or 18 or 20 times. It’s as if they’re on a constant search to strike the right balance between playing textbook basketball and relying on their plentiful gifts to riff for the audience.

“There’s a lot of trust and accountability that comes with that,” Curry says, “because we have a lot of talent and a lot of playmakers and guys that have a creative kind of style and approach to the game.

“But we have to have a certain IQ and just knowing if you can make the simple play, make the simple play. Understand the time and score, the flow of the game, how to manage that.”

Sounds relatively simple. It’s not. The Warriors are like a band composed of incredible musicians, most of whom can drop jaws with a solo performance. Great musicians are at their best when there is time and space. The Warriors often are at the best when improvising.

Without that element, this band of Warriors may as well play straight from sheet music. Artists take chances. Sometimes the result is a spectacular play that fans remember for years. Other times, it’s it ruins the set.

Kerr doesn’t want to kill the element of improvisation. He wants use it more judiciously, saving it for special moments. He believes this band is good enough to play it straight and still provide plenty of entertainment.

“The simple leads to the spectacular,” Kerr says. “That’s one of my pet sayings. But it’s always a balance with this team the last couple years. We are a little loose; it’s part of who we are and I accept that and I embrace it.

“But know when to draw the line, and understand that part of what’s going to make a special play is four or five simple actions to start the play itself. When we keep it simple, it’s amazing how many fun, exciting plays come out of that. It sounds like an oxymoron, but it’s the truth, especially with our guys because they have a lot of skill.”

The Warriors, to a man, say they are enjoying this season. They’re pleased with the NBA-best 34-6 record. They’re tops in the league in most pertinent team statistics.

But they continue to search for symmetry between risk and reward. How to make the right play without sacrificing the thrill of adventure? What, exactly, is the balance between playing with the appropriate amount of joy and seeking that breathtaking video that goes viral?

“If we make six easy passes, simple passes, in a possession, usually somebody gets open and there’s a back cut and there’s a layup or a lob or a 3-pointer and the crowd goes nuts,” Kerr says. “People love it.

“When they try to force the action on that stuff, it’s usually a turnover. And there’s not much joy in a turnover.”

The Warriors are unanimous in that sentiment. Yet the sermons continue because there are so many nights when it seems not everyone is listening.

Cook gives injured Warriors 'huge boost' in anomalous loss

Cook gives injured Warriors 'huge boost' in anomalous loss

OAKLAND -- If Quinn Cook plays at anything close to the level he performed Friday night against the Kings, the Warriors should avoid any catastrophic stumbling in the absence of their top three scorers.

They stumbled plenty in a 98-93 loss to Sacramento, but not because of Cook. The two-way player who has spent most of the season with G-League Santa Cruz scored a team-high 25 points, shot 10-of-13 from the field and played respectable defense.

He did more than could have been reasonably expected.

“I felt like this was coming,” coach Steve Kerr said. “He was fantastic. He really lit it up and gave us a huge boost.”

The Warriors ran into problems elsewhere, shared among the usually reliable veterans who need to be particularly reliable in the absence of Stephen Curry, Kevin Durant and Klay Thompson.

Usual starters Draymond Green and Zaza Pachulia combined to shoot 6-of-20.

Usual reserves Andre Iguodala, Shaun Livingston, David West and Nick Young shot a collective 13-of-39.

In the second half, when Warriors mustered only 34 points -- a season-low for any half -- the six vets combined to take 32 shots and missed 24.

Those are atrocious numbers and they explain what went wrong in a game that was there for the taking.

They’re also an anomaly.

“We just couldn’t get anything going,” Green said. “But we got some good shots. We got ‘Dre on a couple of pull-ups in the lane, I got a couple open shots, Nick got a couple open shots, Zaza got a couple open ones. D-West had one pop in and out. (Kevon Looney) had two pop in and out.

“We just got cold. But hopefully those shots will fall tomorrow.”

West, returning after missing four games with a cyst on his right arm, was 1-of-6 from the field. He came into this game as a 60.8-percent shooter this season.

Igoudala was 4-of-10; he shot 70 percent over the previous 10 games. Young was 5-of-15, well below his 44-percent shooting this season. Livingston’s 3-of-8 shooting is uncharacteristic of someone shooting at least 50 percent for four years running.

If history is any indication, Green (5-of-14) and Pachulia (1-of-6) are not going continue to miss at the rate they did in this game, the first this season in which the Warriors were without all three of their top scorers.

If history is any indication, the Warriors can’t be counted on to score 34 points on 27.3-percent shooting in the second half of a game.

“I loved how our guys battled,” Kerr said. “They really competed well and made some big plays. We just couldn’t get the ball to go down quite enough in the second half.”

That’s going to change, perhaps as soon as Saturday night in Phoenix, were the Suns are playing to lose.

So if Cook plays steady basketball, the Warriors will fall off and their fans won’t become a basket case while waiting for the three shooters. The Warriors surely believe that.

“He really showed up. I’ve been waiting on that Quinn,” Green said. “We needed that. It was great for him to come out and play like that. And most importantly, his shots were falling. Since he’s been playing (more often) he’s been playing well, but his shots weren’t really falling. But tonight, they fell for him.”

They won’t always fall at a rate of 77 percent. They won’t have to once his teammates drop in a few more of their own shots.

Casspi rolls ankle, leaves game vs Kings


Casspi rolls ankle, leaves game vs Kings

OAKLAND -- Omri Casspi sustained a sprained right ankle with 9:00 left in the second quarter of the Warriors-Kings game Friday night and did not return.

After dropping in a short hook shot with 9:04 left in the quarter, Casspi landed awkwardly, rolling his ankle and dropping to the floor clutching his lower leg. Down for a couple minutes, he eventually got up and limped into the locker room, accompanied by physical performance specialist Chelsea Lane.

Casspi played six minutes off the bench, producing 6 points, one assist and one rebound against his former team.

He joins Stephen Curry, Kevin Durant, Pat McCaw and Klay Thompson on the sideline.