With Phil Jackson out, will the Knicks go after Warriors GM Bob Myers?

With Phil Jackson out, will the Knicks go after Warriors GM Bob Myers?

Steve Kerr and Bob Myers were hundreds of miles away from each other, yet bolted upright in bed late Tuesday, slathered in sweat and dread for very different reasons from the same source.

The New York Knickerbockers.

For Kerr, it was the horror of what could have been three years ago if he had decided to sign on to Phil Jackson’s paint factory fire instead of going west and landing in the middle of the next budding dynasty in NBA history. Of course, he wouldn’t have hurt his back jumping up to complain about a call in the 2015 Finals because the Knicks wouldn’t have gone to the Finals, but that’s too parallel universe for me.

For Myers, it was a different problem, specifically whether or to become the first general manager in modern sports history to be perpetually unaccessible by phone, simply out of fear of getting That Call from James Dolan and being offered three times his current salary and the title of Vice-Emperor.

Because that’s the only thing the Knicks have, and the only thing the Knicks have ever had – pots of money to work in the belly of the cultural beast.

And New York money has always had a way of turning heads, as though money in any other part of the country is somehow pegged to the Canadian dollar. It’s what Dolan sells when he chases a candidate – the chance to conquer the unconquerable – and there’s always some sap, er, candidate willing to buy in.

But Kerr, tempted by Jackson’s magical rhetoric, resisted because he saw better opportunities elsewhere – and because failing with the Knicks is a fast pass back to the second analyst’s chair at TNT.

And Myers will almost surely be asked by Dolan (or one of his gremlins) to abandon his current role as Executive of the Year to get obscenely wealthier and try to clear the wreckage and point the franchise in a recognizable direction.

That, despite the fact that the Knicks have historically been more rumor than fact. They have made the playoffs less often by percentage than any original franchise other than Philadelphia/San Francisco/Golden State and Rochester/Cincinnati/Kansas City/Omaha/Sacramento. They’ve won four fewer division titles than the Miami Heat despite having 42 more cracks at it. They’ve been a formidable foe only intermittently, and if they didn’t have the illusory advantage of hiding behind Madison Square Garden, they’d be about as nationally relevant as the Kings. They probably would have been relocated a couple of times by now and be working out of Las Vegas by now.

In short, the Knicks are smoke and mirrors in a velvet floor-length coat, have been that almost their entire history, and the fact that Jackson drove them deeper into the earth’s crust and with more willful orneriness only makes their historical irrelevance more irksome.

(And yes, the Warriors were in an even more parlous historical state than the Knicks were before 2015, so it isn’t like their history is some glorious medley that makes all who hear it break out in dance. They’re the hot item on the menu now, true, but as a historical artifact they are aggressively meh).

But Dolan has his own bent memory, and he will know that he lost out on Kerr. So why wouldn’t he smooth-talk Myers (and if you’ve heard Dolan’s voice, you know what a stretch that is) with the two things that prop up the Knicks as a concept – more money than Belgium, and the self-obsessed myth of New York? If he doesn’t, it would border on corporate malfeasance.

Now maybe talking to Myers will bring back horrible memories of the Don Nelson Era, which was better than the Jackson Era only in that it came undone quicker and was fixed faster. But Dolan has never learned from his past mistakes because of his unerring gift for making them the mistakes of others, and he will chase the hottest new name with the biggest bag of cash and the most fevered line of arglebargle.

And maybe Myers sees the money Jerry West is getting to be a more powerful consigliere in Los Angeles than he was in Oakland, and says, “This is the window, right here.”

And that’s why he woke up with such a start when his subconscious heard the word that Jackson was being binned. He suspected that phone call from the DolanCave would come, and he knew either that he would have to throw his phone in the toilet, or get used to saying things like, “Yes, honey, I know you sound like my wife, but how do I know you’re really you and not someone from the Knicks” or “I don’t care if he’s offering me Kristaps Porzingis for Kevon Looney. Tell him I’m not in for him, ever.”

Such are the perils of life on top. The bottom is always a phone call away. Ask Phil Jackson. Ask the triangle offense. Ask Carmelo Anthony.

Hell, just ask the Knicks about being the Knicks. Who would know better?

Four things we learned while Steph Curry dealt with fourth ankle injury

Four things we learned while Steph Curry dealt with fourth ankle injury

UPDATE (2:40pm PT on Tuessday): Steph Curry has been cleared for full team practices with the goal of playing this week, the Warriors announced.


The Warriors’ usual late-spring sprint toward the postseason, already slowed to a limp, deteriorated into a forlorn crawl Monday night in San Antonio as they were losing for the fourth time in six games.

Draymond Green, the only “healthy” member of the team’s All-Star quartet, left the game in the second quarter with a pelvic contusion and did not return.

Though Green said after this 89-75 loss to the Spurs that he doesn’t consider this a serious injury, it’s abundantly clear reinforcements can’t arrive soon enough.

Stephen Curry, a profoundly superior reinforcement, may return as soon as Friday.

Curry’s tender right ankle is scheduled to be reevaluated Tuesday, after which the Warriors will establish a timeline for his return. He could, according to team and league sources, be back in the lineup Friday night when the Atlanta Hawks visit Oracle Arena.

That would provide a massive injection of talent for the Warriors, who lost of three games during a four-day stretch in which they were forced to rely heavily on reserves and role players.

“We’re already shorthanded and then we lose another All-Star, the glue to our team, Draymond, at halftime,” said Quinn Cook, who in scoring 73 points over the past three games did an admirable job of trying of producing Curry-like numbers.

As good as Cook was on Monday, scoring 20 points, it’s a bit much to ask Cook to lead the Warriors past a San Antonio team fighting to extend its 20-year streak of consecutive playoff appearances.

The Warriors are built around their four All-Stars -- Kevin Durant, Klay Thompson, Curry and Green. They usually can withstand the loss of one, and they can often are OK missing two. But when it’s three, and possibly four, the defending champs are a home without a foundation.

As the Warriors were losing four of six games, and two of the last three, we have learned four things:

1) Cook is an NBA keeper.

The point guard from Duke, who turns 25 on Friday, has proved not only that he belongs in the league but also that he can survive in the rotation of a championship contender. He’s considerably more effective than Pat McCaw. Even if everybody were healthy, it would be hard, maybe foolish, to deny Cook minutes.

2) Kevon Looney continues to smooth the rough edges of his game.

The Warriors opened the season uncertain what they could expect from a forward that has undergone surgery on both hips. Month after month, though, he has done most everything they could have asked. He operates well in their switching defense, is effective in traffic and now he’s blocking shots and raining jumpers. At this rate, the Warriors would be delighted to have him back next season.

3) David West and Jordan Bell are in search of rhythm.

West was reliably excellent, at both ends, prior to missing five games with a cyst on his right arm. Since returning last Friday, there have been visible signs of rust. He’ll be OK in time, but at 37 likely needs another game or two to rediscover his touch.

Bell missed 14 games with a left ankle sprain, returned briefly, sustained a sprain of his right ankle and missed three more games. In the three games since his return, he has yet to look comfortable. It’s not just rust; it’s also the team around him. He’s at his best when supporting the stars. It may take him a while before he shines again.

4) Postseason minutes may be scarce for Nick Young

The Warriors hired Young to score while not embarrassing himself on defense and he has had good moments on both ends. But his inconsistency -- partly attributed to unspectacular conditioning -- grates on coaches and sometimes teammates. As much as he wants to enjoy the postseason, he’s playing his way toward an insignificant role unless injuries dictate otherwise.

Source: Warriors, Curry aiming for Friday return


Source: Warriors, Curry aiming for Friday return

UPDATE (2:25pm PT on Tuesday): The Warriors announced that following an examination by the team's medical staff, Steph Curry has been cleared to participate in full team practices beginning on Wednesday. The goal is for Curry to "play later this week."

The Warriors return to action Friday when they host the Hawks. They face the Jazz on Sunday in Oakland.


The Warriors have been without Stephen Curry for six full games and all but the first two minutes of a seventh. The last three were less out of medical necessity than an abundance of caution.

Curry could, however, return as soon as Friday when the Atlanta Hawks visit Oracle Arena, multiple sources disclosed to NBC Sports Bay Area on Monday night. ESPN, citing league sources, was first to report the team’s plan.

The two-time MVP’s right ankle is scheduled to be reevaluated Tuesday, after which time a firm return date is expected.

Curry was physically able to play -- and actually pushed to return -- last weekend, according to league sources. But the Warriors, looking ahead to the playoffs and seeing diminished value in the remaining regular-season games, opted to continue rehabilitation in hopes of maximizing support for the area around his ankle.

The Warriors have described Curry’s injury not as a sprain but a “tweak,” implying less severity.

Though the Warriors won the game in which Curry was hurt, 110-107 over the Spurs on March 8, they have since lost four of six, including 89-75 on Monday in San Antonio.

The Warriors arrived early Tuesday morning and won’t practice Tuesday afternoon and are contemplating skipping an official practice on Wednesday.

The Warriors, averaging a league-leading 115.5 points per game this season, saw that figure drop to 103.3 during Curry’s six-game absence.