Warriors

Steve Kerr takes on the 'Kardashian of the NBA' in epic rant about society

Steve Kerr takes on the 'Kardashian of the NBA' in epic rant about society

Steve Kerr is never one to back down from tackling the hot button issues.

So after he answered the important question about Kevin Durant's healthy (he's day-to-day with a right calf strain), he was asked about the drama surrounding LaVar Ball's comments about Luke Walton and the reaction from Mavericks head coach Rick Carlisle, who blasted ESPN for running the story.

What transpired next was a nearly three-minute response that touched on everything:

"This is the world we live in now. I was thinking about ESPN. They laid off, I don't know, 100 people. How many people did they lay off over the last year? More? Well over 100. Many of whom were really talented journalists covering the NBA. This is not an ESPN judgment, it's a societal thing more than anything. Were we're going is were going away from covering the game and getting close to sensationalized news. It's not even news really, it's just complete nonsense. But if you package that irrational nonsense with glitter and ribbon, people are going to watch. I've talked to people in the media this year. I say 'Why do you guys have to cover that guy?' They say they don't want to, nobody wants to, but our bosses tell us we have to because of the ratings, because of the readership. Somewhere, I guess this is in Lithania, LaVar Ball is laughing at all of us. People are eating out of his hands for no apparent reason, other than he's become like the Kardashian of the NBA, and I guess that sells and that's what's true in politics, in entertainment and now in sports. It doesn't matter if there is any substance involved with an issue. It's just, can we make it really interesting, for no apparent reason. There's nothing interesting about that story. Do you know how many parents of my players are sitting at home going 'Why isn't he playing my kid?' And yet, we're sticking a microphone in his face because it apparently gets ratings. I don't know how cares, but people care. They must care, or ESPN wouldn't be spending whatever they're spending to send reporters to Lithunia when they are laying off people who are writing really substantial (stories), people like Ethan Strauss and Marc Stein are getting laid off. Again, this is not a condemnation of ESPN. It' not. It's societal issue. It's been going on for man, many years. And it's invading the sports world now."

Kerr also addressed Walton getting dragged into this. Before becoming the Lakers head coach last season, Walton spent two years as an assistant coach for Kerr. They are both University of Arizona alums.

"I feel horrible for Luke. That's my guy. He's one of my best friends. He shouldn't have to deal with this. To me, one of the things about the NBA is it's always been a haven from the parents. The guys who coach high school are the ones who have to deal with the parents. I've never had to talk to a parent who's been upset about playing time. I'm sure there are plenty out there, but they don't have a voice in the NBA. But for whatever reason, we're giving this guy a voice and Luke's gotta deal with it and it's a shame."

Asked if he's talked to Walton about the current situation, Kerr didn't answer, but he offered this:

"He's handling it great. He's doing all he can. It's just part of his gig."

Steve Kerr updates Jordan Bell's status

Steve Kerr updates Jordan Bell's status

Jordan Bell likely envisioned a longer debut at the United Center. 

The Chicago Bulls traded the pick used to select Bell to the Golden State Warriors for cash considerations, and Bell's taken plenty of chances to remind the Bulls to remind them of that fact. 

Instead of getting another chance to rub it in, Bell injured his left ankle 24 seconds in to Golden State's 119-112 win over Chicago on Wednesday. On Thursday, Bell and the Warriors learned the results of his MRI, and it's not as bad as the team first feared, according to head coach Steve Kerr.

"Well, it seemed a lot worse at the time when it happened. Everyone kind of thought he had a broken a bone just based on his reaction [and] what he was telling us," Steve Kerr told Damon Bruce on 95.7 The Game.  "But the MRI was pretty good this morning. Nothing glaring. 

"The X-ray was fine yesterday. So it doesn't appear to be more than a bone bruise but bone bruises can be tricky to heal, so we'll see what happens. But so far, the news has all been good."

Bell has emerged as a bench contributor in his first NBA season. In 38 games, he's averaging 5.1 points, 3.9 rebounds, 1.8 assists, and 1.1 blocks in 14.4 minutes.

Two Warriors named All-Star Game starters

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USATSI

Two Warriors named All-Star Game starters

After sending four players to the NBA All-Star Game last season in New Orleans, the Warriors are halfway to repeating the feat this season.

Point guard Stephen Curry and small forward Kevin Durant were voted in as Western Conference starters for the game scheduled for Feb. 18 at Staples Center in Los Angeles, the NBA announced on Thursday.

Though Curry has missed 15 games -- nearly one-third of the season -- it has not hurt his popularity; His No. 30 is the NBA’s best-selling jersey for the third straight season. He is averaging team-leading 27.7 points, 6.5 assists and 5.3 rebounds, and 1.65 steals per game.

Curry is the first member of the Warriors to be named a starter for five consecutive All-Star games. As the player with the most fan votes, Curry becomes a captain and is in position to select the members of his team.

Durant, who has missed eight games this season, was named as a starter for the sixth time, the first four coming when he was a member of the Thunder.

Durant is averaging 26.2 points (fifth in the league) 6.9 rebounds, 5.4 assists and 2.05 blocks (fourth in the league) per game.