Warriors

The Warriors' pending luxury tax bills might pinch a good deal more

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USATI

The Warriors' pending luxury tax bills might pinch a good deal more

There is no compelling reason why you should necessarily believe, let alone care about, the exhaustive ESPN story about 14 NBA teams losing money in these flush times (or ten, or nine, depending on what numbers you use).

But at some point the Golden State Warriors might have to do so.

The report is a head-scratcher not because the authors, Brian Windhorst and Zach Lowe, don’t know what they’re doing – quite the contrary. They are very good at what they do. But it is because the NBA has never had more money at its disposal, even after all the massive player contracts they have paid out in The Great Money Burn, and has, as owners are wont to do, decided to fight over how all that money is distributed.

The Warriors are among the league’s best earners ($91.9 million profit a year ago, even after paying $42 million in revenue sharing), but if 143 (or 10, or nine) teams are losing money after the $24 billion TV deal that crazed them all, all of a sudden the Oakland economic juggernaut might well find itself with significantly less.

Not enough for you to care, necessarily, but enough that their pending luxury tax bills might pinch a good deal more than they already do, and enough that their new arena turn from loss to profit might be delayed.

The ESPN report is careful to point out that other arena income isn’t factored into these numbers, and the old canard that there are always three sets of books – one for the tax man, one for your partners and the true one – has never been more useful. In short, without knowing the source of documents Lowe and Windhorst received, we cannot educatedly speculate on the motive behind the leak.

The Warriors will be fine no matter whether the league decides to make sure all teams are genuinely profitable every year by recalibrating revenue sharing or tax payments. They have gone from a fringe operation economically to one of the industry leaders (the Los Angeles Lakers and New York Knickerbockers are still the king and prince regent of this royal family).

But the only thing that makes billionaires itchier than having “not enough” money is watching one of their partners having what they consider “too much” money. Which is to say, more money than they themselves do. The boardroom battle over that will begin shortly, if it hasn’t already started.

Money’s funny that way. After all, if there’s one last quarter heading toward a sewer grate, there will be 50 well-dressed middle-aged and old men bashing heads in unison trying to grab it before it falls.

Durant reveals second-favorite jersey number, 'I can't get that here'

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AP

Durant reveals second-favorite jersey number, 'I can't get that here'

The Warriors play the Lakers Monday night in Los Angeles. 

With the Lakers at 10-17 and currently owning the 11-seed in the Western Conference, this would seem like just any other game. Grabbing a ticket, however, will be nearly impossible. 

The Lakers are honoring Kobe Bryant that night at Staples Center. Bryant will have both No. 8 and No. 24 retired by the team he spent his entire 20-year career.

Kevin Durant has worn the same jersey number his entire 11-year NBA career. He first started sporting No. 35 his one and only season at the University of Texas. 

"To have two numbers retired, it had me thinking, damn, that'd be cool," Durant said to Anthony Slater of The Athletic. "I got another favorite number that I like.”

Durant then revealed his other favorite number to be 11. But, that's off limits in Golden State. 

"I can't get that here,” Durant continued saying. 

Klay Thompson has worn No. 11 throughout his seven-year career with the Warriors. He did wear No. 1 at Washington State though, so maybe Durant has a chance to do his own Kobe impression one day. 

With Curry out, Durant shows you exactly why Warriors went all in for him

With Curry out, Durant shows you exactly why Warriors went all in for him

OAKLAND -- Exhibit A: 35 points, 11 rebounds and 10 assists. A triple-double and two blocked shots. Warriors win in Charlotte.

Exhibit B: 36 points, 10 rebounds, seven assists and five blocks. Warriors win in Detroit.

Exhibit C: 28 points, nine rebounds, five assists and three blocks. Warriors win at home over Portland.

Exhibit D, Thursday night at Oracle Arena, in a 112-97 win over the Dallas Mavericks: 36 points, 11 rebounds, seven assists and two blocks.

This is why the Warriors invested time and money and energy 18 months ago in their shameless pursuit of Kevin Durant. This is why a platoon of them took cross-country flights. This is why they embraced the possibility of rejection. This is why any possibility of failing and having to resort to Plan B put knots in their bellies.

For those times when they would be without Stephen Curry, their leader and a two-time MVP, they could turn to Durant, himself a former MVP and four-time scoring champ still in the prime of his career.

“He’s just really, really good,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr says. “KD is one of the most talented scorers to ever play the game. He can make stuff out of nothing.”

Just as Curry found another level shortly after Durant went down last February, missing 19 games, Durant is filling a void perhaps only he could fill. He already has entered Exhibits A-D, and he seems to be working his way through the alphabet.

“I pretty much figure I can do whatever I want on the basketball court if I put my mind to it,” Durant says. “So, whatever position I’m in, I’m ready to conquer it.”

There is a cruelty about what Durant does to defenders when he’s at his best, as he has been over the past four games, ever since Dec. 4, when a sprained ankle took Curry out of the lineup. Durant taunts them without meaning to (maybe). Too quick for 7-footers and too long for prototypical wings, he scores with an ease that leaves observers breathless, if not wordless.

“He doesn’t have many ceilings to his skill set,” says assistant coach Ron Adams, who coached Durant for two seasons (2008-10) in Oklahoma City and is enjoying the reunion.

“He may be the most efficient basketball player I’ve ever played with,” Klay Thompson says. “He makes it look easy out there.”

Thompson is basking in the shelter provided by Durant’s presence. Kerr is delighted to have Durant as, get this, a splendid alternative.

“It’s so amazing,” Kerr says, “to have a player like him, who is a superstar and who, without ever saying anything, without me saying anything to him, with Steph out he just takes over.”

The Warriors are 4-0 since Curry left the lineup. They are 3-0 in games for which fellow starters Draymond Green and Zaza Pachulia joined Curry on the sideline. Durant has stepped in the fill a void perhaps only he can fill.

He’s playing at MVP level, averaging 33.8 points, 10.3 rebounds, 7.3 assists and 3.0 blocks. Through 25 Warriors games this season, Durant had one 30-point game. He has had his three highest-scoring games in the last four.

They were listless in the first half Thursday night, committing ghastly turnovers and playing haphazard defense. They were behind, at home, to a Mavericks team hurtling toward 55 losses.

Except the Warriors had Durant. He was keeping them in the game. He scored 12 of their 24 first-quarter points. When the Mavs tried go up nine midway through the second quarter, he was there was block Harrison Barnes’ layup.

“Kevin is amazing,” says teammate Omri Casspi. “He’s always been great for our team. The past few games he’s just picking up in so many different levels. He’s having Defensive Player of the Year numbers defensively. He’s playing great. Really helping everybody. Blocking shots.”

Shortly after Dallas went up by five early in the third quarter, Durant was there, spoon-feeding Jordan Bell for a layup to cut it to three. A few seconds later, Durant was finding Casspi for a short jumper to bring the Warriors within one.

A Durant jumper pulled the Warriors into the last tie of the game, 61-61, with 7:20 left in the third, and 31 seconds later his 3-point bomb put them ahead for good. Durant followed that by accounting for four of the next six field goals, assisting on one of the other two. Game.

“Frankly, Durant just comes down and jumps over us a few times,” Mavericks coach Rick Carlisle says. “It’s very difficult to stop that if a guy is that good.”

Says Kerr: “There were times where it didn’t look like we had anything going and he just rose up and knocked down threes or put it on the floor and scored. He’s basically un-guardable . . . KD seems to have an answer for everything.”

With Curry and Green out, Durant is absorbing most of their scoring and playmaking and defense. If that sounds like a lot, it’s because it is.

But that’s why he is here. So there is no panic when Curry goes down six weeks into season, even if it’s conceivable he could miss a month. Durant is on it, diving into the challenge in a way he plunged into the NBA Finals last June.

Remember what happened? The Warriors won in five games, Durant coming away with a Finals MVP trophy and his first championship ring.

He was in a zone then, and he’s in one now.

“When Steph and Draymond come back, I’m looking forward to them coming back,” Durant says. “I get back into what my role is.

“I’m ready to conquer anything I have in front of me and I know if I put my mind to it, I can do whatever I want.”