Warriors

Yunel Escobar suspended for anti-gay message

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Yunel Escobar suspended for anti-gay message

From Comcast SportsNetNEW YORK (AP) -- Yunel Escobar insisted he meant no insult, reiterating that the words he wrote were supposed to be "just a joke."The Toronto Blue Jays had a different read, suspending their starting shortstop for three games on Tuesday for wearing eye-black displaying a homophobic slur in Spanish during a game last weekend against Boston.Escobar apologized to his team and "to all those who have been offended.""It was not something I intended to be offensive," he said through a translator. "It was not anything intended to be directed at anyone in particular."Escobar said he wrote the message 10 minutes before Saturday's home game on his eye-black, a sticker players wear under their eyes to reduce sun glare. The 29-year-old Cuban said he frequently puts messages there -- usually inspirational, manager John Farrell offered -- and had never previously written that specific slur.Escobar insisted the word is often used within teams and by Latinos and "I didn't see it as something bad at the time.""For us, it doesn't have the significance to the way it's being interpreted now," he said. "It's a word without a meaning.""I don't have anything against homosexuals," he said, adding he didn't mean for the term to be "misinterpreted" by the gay community.The suspension -- issued after input from Commissioner Bud Selig, the players' union and team management -- was to have started Tuesday night. The game between Toronto and New York was rained out and a day-night doubleheader was set for Wednesday.The penalty was announced in a 26-minute news conference at Yankee Stadium. Escobar wore a jacket and jeans and was joined by Farrell, Toronto general manager Alex Anthopoulos, coach Luis Rivera and translator Robbie Guerra, a lawyer from the players' union.Escobar's lost salary during the ban -- about 82,000 -- will be directed to two advocacy groups, the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation and You Can Play.Escobar also will take part in an outreach initiative to promote tolerance to others based on their sexual orientation, and participate in a sensitivity training program.Pictures posted online showed Escobar with the message written during the Red Sox-Blue Jays game. Farrell said Escobar's notes are often to the effect of "Let's go today." They draw so little attention that nobody caught the change."There was no reason to think it was something derogatory," Farrell said.Farrell said the slur was written in small letters and "if someone had seen it, I would suspect someone would have said something."Major League Baseball regulations prohibit derogatory words and symbols on uniforms. Writing something of that nature on eye-black would fall under that category, MLB spokesman Pat Courtney said.The NFL and college football have banned eye-black messages. The college ban came after stars including Tim Tebow, who wrote Bible verses, and Reggie Bush, who put his hometown area code, began to use the eye-black to send messages."Mr. Escobar has admitted that his actions were a mistake and I am hopeful he can use this unfortunate situation as an opportunity to educate himself and others that intolerance has no place in our game or society," Selig said in a statement.GLAAD President Herndon Graddick commended the decision."Today's actions show that MLB and the Toronto Blue Jays are committed to creating an environment that all fans and families can enjoy, not a place where discriminatory language and anti-gay attitudes are accepted," Graddick said in a statement.Anthopoulos said he had spent most of the day with Escobar at the commissioner's office."I don't know there's a right way to deal with these things," he said. "You're not going to satisfy everyone."In May 2011, MLB suspended Atlanta pitching coach Roger McDowell for two weeks without pay for inappropriate comments and gestures with homophobic and sexual overtones he made toward fans before a game in San Francisco.In April, Miami Marlins manager Ozzie Guillen was suspended for five games by his team because of comments that he loves Fidel Castro. Many Cuban-Americans were angered by the remarks.On Tuesday, Guillen said he didn't think Escobar meant to be offensive."I think he just did it for fun. I know he didn't mean to hurt anybody's feelings. Nobody is that stupid," he said before the Marlins hosted Atlanta."In my house, we call (each other) that word every 20 seconds. I've got three kids," Guillen said. "For us, it's like What's up, bro? What's up, dude?' It's how you say it and to who you say it. But that's our country. We have to respect this country. Sometimes for us it's funny, for other people it's not."Escobar was traded from Atlanta to Toronto in July 2010. He is hitting .251 this season with nine home runs and 49 RBIs.Escobar's salary this year is 5 million. The Blue Jays have club options on him for 2014 and 2015.

Kerr dreams of world with quiet Trump and LaVar Ball: 'Wouldn't that be great?'

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Kerr dreams of world with quiet Trump and LaVar Ball: 'Wouldn't that be great?'

In the real world, the President of the United States Donald Trump started a Twitter feud with LaVar Ball on Sunday. 

Trump believes he should have left three college athletes, including Ball's son LiAngelo, in a Chinese jail for shoplifting. In return, Warriors head coach Steve Kerr wants the two to simply stop talking.

"It would be nice for all of us if both of them would just be quiet," Kerr said to reporters at the Barclays Center. "Wouldn't that be great?"

Coach Kerr on LaVar/Trump beef: “It would be nice for all of us if both of them would just be quiet.”

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"Modern life. Two people seeking attention and are both getting it, so I'm sure both guys are really happy," Kerr initially said when first asked about the two. 

Unprompted, Kerr then asked reporters for a request to help us all. 

"You know what would help, if all of you stopped covering both of them," Kerr pleaded. "Is that possible? You can probably stop covering LaVar. I don't think you can stop covering the President. I don't think that'll work." 

Ex-Warriors All-Star David Lee announces his retirement from the NBA

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Ex-Warriors All-Star David Lee announces his retirement from the NBA

In the span of about 16 days, David Lee has made a lot of changes to his life.

On Nov. 3, he announced that he got engaged to tennis star Caroline Wozniacki.

On Sunday, the former Warriors All-Star forward announced his retirement from the NBA with a post on Instagram.

"An epic night celebrating my retirement with my friends and family! Thank you to my amazing fiancée @carowozniacki for planning the surprise!" Lee wrote as the caption for a photo of him with all his friends.

Former teammates Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson were among those that "Liked" the posted. Curry even left a comment.

"They'll still always have trouble with the pitch and follow man Man! Congrats," Curry wrote.

Acquired in July of 2009 from the Knicks, Lee played five seasons with the Warriors. During his time in Oakland, he averaged 16.7 points and 9.6 rebounds.

Lee was named to the Western Conference All-Star team during the 2012-13 season. He averaged 18.5 points and 11.2 rebounds per game that season.

The 34-year-old capped off his tenure with the Warriors by winning an NBA championship in 2015. After the playoff run, the Warriors traded Lee to Boston. He spent last season with the Spurs and appeared in 79 games.