Bruins

Bergeron won't play in Quebec Caravan League, leaning toward Switzerland

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Bergeron won't play in Quebec Caravan League, leaning toward Switzerland

Patrice Bergeron was always a huge Quebec Nordiques fan growing up in the shadow of Quebec City, so it would be logical the Bs center would long to play in front of his fellow Quebecois.

But it wont be as part of the Quebec Caravan League set to start on Sept. 27 in his native countryside. Bergerons agent, Kent Hughes, told CSNNE.com on Tuesday that the Bs alternate captain is unlikely to play in the Quebec Caravan League organized by fellow NHL skaters Max Talbot and Bruno Gervais.

Instead No. 37 is looking into possible playing opportunities in Europe like so many of his Bruins teammates. Per sources close to Bergeron, CSNNE.com has learned the Selke Trophy winner is leaning toward playing in the same Swiss League that signed Tyler Seguin although nothing has been determined at this point.

The first Quebec Caravan League contest will be held in the Chateauguay, a suburb of Montreal, and is expected to feature some of the best Francophone players out work during the NHL lockout: Marc-Andre Fleury, Kris Letang, David Desharnais, Mathieu Darche and David Perron along with Marc-Edouard Vlasic, Alex Burrows, Derrick Brassard and Simon Gagne.

The games are scheduled to take place on a weekly basis throughout the Quebec province and tickets can be purchased at a cost of 20 with the proceeds set to go to charity. While the Caravan League should boast some good talent, its expected that moving to Switzerland would place Bergeron in a much higher intensity situation while staying prepared for Bs duty.

Like all of Bergerons teammates that have already signed in Europe, the Bruins center will have an out clause allowing him to return to the NHL when the lockout is finally over. The Bruins pivot played in the AHL for the Providence Bruins as a 19-year-old during the last work stoppage that wiped out the entire 2004-05 hockey season.

Morning Skate: Cheers for Boyle as he returns to practice with Devils

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Morning Skate: Cheers for Boyle as he returns to practice with Devils

Here are all the links from around the hockey world, and what I’m reading while determined to go see Foo Fighters at Fenway Park this time around. 
 
-- In the great news department, Hingham native Brian Boyle hears cheers at practice as he returns to work for the New Jersey Devils after his cancer diagnosis. Boyle might be wearing a Devils uniform, but he knows he has all of Boston in his corner along with many, many other corners of the hockey world. 

-- There is no panic with the Maple Leafs over the slow start for Mitch Marner, who has been dropped to the fourth line in the early going.
 
-- Wellesley native Chris Wagner is beginning to get recognized for his big hits and physical play with the Anaheim Ducks

-- Senators prospect and Massachusetts native Joey Daccord makes an unbelievable game-saving stop for his college team. 

-- For something completely different: Greg Nicotero talks about the Walking Dead premiere, and a character thought dead that might actually still be alive.
 

Khudobin can't save Bruins' goaltending situation

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Khudobin can't save Bruins' goaltending situation

The entire concept of Tuukka Rask getting pushed by one of his backups is based on the backup consistently performing at a high standard, and that wasn’t the case for Anton Khudobin over the weekend.

Just as it isn’t solely the fault of Rask when the Bruins lose, it wasn’t solely the fault of Khudobin that Boston squandered leads of 3-0 and 4-1 in an overtime loss to Buffalo on Saturday night. But Khudobin couldn’t step up and carry the B's when they clearly started losing their edge in the second half of the game, and that inconsistency will certainly make the Bruins pine for a sooner-rather-than-later return of a concussed Rask.

“Erratic,” said coach Bruce Cassidy when asked to describe Khudobin postgame. “He battles. We love that about him. He battled to the end. He certainly made his share of saves. We need to be better in front of him. But there were times that, there were fires that needed to be put out that shouldn’t have been necessary. But that happens sometimes.”

It was certainly too much to expect Khudobin to be perfect, but they just needed him to be good enough to pull them through while they were getting waylaid in the second half of the game. That proved to be a major challenge, given the players the Bruins are missing and the extremely rough night suffered by Torey Krug (minus-3 on Saturday night, and minus-8 for the season). Khudobin finished with 37 stops as a defense corps without Adam McQuaid and Kevan Miller wilted in the third period and the overtime, but he couldn’t make the clean saves for whistles when the team really needed them. Case in point was a Rasmus Ristolainen tester in overtime while the Bruins were in the midst of being outshot by a 6-0 margin in the extra session. Khudobin got a glove on it but couldn’t cleanly catch it for a badly needed stoppage in play at a time when Krug, David Pastrnak and Brad Marchand had been caught on the ice for over two minutes.

"The start was great, and the game was great until we scored the fourth goal, and I think after that, we thought it was an easy game,” said Khudobin. “[The high volume of shots] wasn’t that much difficult, I like shots, like probably every other goalie, but they were crashing the net. They were going hard. There were a lot of deflections, a lot of rebounds, a lot of scrums in front of the net, which were . . .that’s the dangerous part, not just the shots.”

Khudobin, 31, has taken five of a possible six points in the games he's played this season and is off to a solid start with a 2-0-1 record, a 2.98 goals-against average and a .910 save percentage. He looks like he’s going to be a perfectly fine backup, enabling the Bruins to hold Rask to the 55-60 games they’ve forecasted for his peak performance this season.

But Saturday night was a major blow to any hopes that Rask would be pushed competitively by his backup, and that a Khudobin hot streak could spark a slow-starting, and now injured, Rask when he does return.

Instead the Bruins are left to hope they can survive while missing Rask along with a number of other key players, and that the goalie returns sooner than later to a team that can’t survive too many morale-crushing defeats like the choke job against the lowly Sabres.

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