Bruins

Chiarelli: Marchand is "the full package"

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Chiarelli: Marchand is "the full package"

We all know somebody like him: The guy who you love when he's on your team, but hate when he's on the opposing team.

He'll brag. He'll talk trash. He'll do whatever he can to get under your skin, and even though you know he's doing it on purpose, you can't help but let it get to you.

Meet Brad Marchand.

Bruins fans love him, his teammates love him, and now we know his GM loves him too. The rest of the NHL world? Probably not so much. Marchand and the B's agreed upon a four-year, 18 million dollar contract on Friday, locking up the pesky yet productive left winger through the 2016-17 season.

For Peter Chiarelli, signing Marchand to another extension (he signed a two-year extension last year) means keeping a player the team views as a main part of its core for years to come.

"His style of play, his persona, his timely goals and his amount of goals obviously bring a great component to the Bruins and the Bruins organization," Chiarelli said on Friday. "It's nice too when you can sign a player like Brad who has worked his way up through the organization and plays the way that we all enjoy watching him play, and that the general manager enjoys watching him play. An in-your-face game, he sacrifices his body, and he's really coming into his own as an offensive player."

He sure is. In Marchand's second full season with the B's, the 59, 183-pound native of Nova Scotia registered NHL career highs in goals, assists and points, recording 28-27=55 totals, along with 87 penalty minutes in 76 games. His 28 goals ranked second on the Bruins, behind Tyler Seguins 29 tallies, and his plus-31 rating ranked fifth in the league.

You'd be hard-pressed to find anyone who envisioned numbers like that out of Marchand just a couple years ago. Well, anyone aside from Marchand.

"From the start I remember him from his first camp saying that he expected to make the team," Chiarelli said. "I was a little shocked at that comment. I liked the braggadocio, I liked the confidence. So that was my first impression of Brad."

As it turned out, Marchand also walked the walk. In his first full season with the B's he played in 77 games, notching 21-20=41 totals and 51 penalty minutes. He finished the season tied for third in the league with five shorthanded goals and recorded the second highest plusminus rating among NHL rookies with plus-25.

Marchand has had to balance using his skills as an agitator with his skills as a scorer something that he's had trouble with at times. Chiarelli doesn't want Marchand to try to be a new player now that he has a shiny new deal. He signed him to be the player that he always has been with Boston.

"I like the whole package," Chiarelli said. "He went through some stuff last year with a couple of incidents and through the disciplinary process where we were in a couple of philosophical discussions with that office. So I think, and I think Brad recognizes and you'll have to talk to him about it but I think he recognizes that part of his game as being a valuable part of his game. And he's a smart enough player that as you get older and learn the ropes a little bit more you can tweak your game a little bit. And I think the last year in the NHL he had a really good year last year, but I know that he had some struggles with playing his game. So he will continue to draw that fine line. He's certainly aware of it and that the line has bloomed a bit. So, I like the whole package."

Marchand wasn't available for comment in regards to his new extension. He's out hunting moose with his father in Newfoundland, Canada.

Poor moose. Getting shot at is one thing, but getting shot at by Marchand? Talk about added insult to injury. Just ask 29 teams in the NHL.

Morning Skate: Bruins might part with prospects in right deal

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Morning Skate: Bruins might part with prospects in right deal

Here are all the links from around the hockey world, and what I’m reading while it’s once again snowing in Boston.
 
-- Interesting stuff as always from FOH (Friend of Haggs) Elliotte Friedman. Among his 31 thoughts: His notion that the Bruins have told other teams they won’t be trading away any of their young players. I think it’s pretty clear they have no intentions of dealing Brandon Carlo, Charlie McAvoy, Jake DeBrusk, Danton Heinen or Anders Bjork, and rightfully so given the impact they’ve had on the NHL roster. But the Bruins certainly may be willing to deal some of their next wave of prospects if the right player becomes available, so I wouldn’t take that as a blanket statement that Don Sweeney won’t be trading any of his organization’s young players.
 
-- Scary stuff for the Chicago Blackhawks, as they’re worried that goalie Corey Crawford could be out for the season with vertigo issues.
 
-- Kid Rock's being named featured performer at the 2018 NHL All-Star Game received very “meh” reactions from those around the hockey world. Personally, I was hoping for Chaka Khan.
 
-- The Calgary Flames are finally living up to their big expectations after struggling in the first half of the season.
 
-- So what exactly do the Ottawa Senators have to play for in their final 40 games of the season after losing their way out of playoff contention?
 
-- Good piece from FOH (Friend of Haggs) Arpon Basu on the lasting legacy that Claude Julien has left with the Bruins.
 
-- For something completely different: The synopsis is finally out for the new Han Solo standalone Star Wars movie, but still no trailer or teaser.

Sounds like some Bruins players suffering from Claude fatigue

Sounds like some Bruins players suffering from Claude fatigue

BRIGHTON, Mass – The resume for Claude Julien speaks for itself in terms of greatness in Boston, so he certainly will get a warm ovation from the TD Garden crowd in his first visit back to Boston since getting fired last February. Julien coached the Boston Bruins for 10 years, won a franchise record 419 games over that time span, made it to the Cup Finals twice and of course hoisted the Cup in 2011.

It won’t matter that he’s now the head coach of the Montreal Canadiens when Julien gets his video tribute, and basks a long ovation similar to the one he received when he was recognized for passing Art Ross on the B’s all-time wins list a couple of season ago. The warmth will be a little weird in the middle of a Bruins/Canadiens rivalry game, but it’s clear that Bruins fans appreciate the job done by Julien for such a long period of time.

The mutual respect was also clear when players like Patrice Bergeron spoke warmly of their coach ahead of last weekend’s showdown in Montreal, which the Bruins eventually pulled out in a shootout at the Bell Centre.

But it would seem the Bruins are starting to get a little tired of tossing verbal bouquets at the guy that’s now behind the Habs bench. It all started with Tuukka Rask’s postgame reaction on Saturday when asked if there was any extra emotion going up against his old coach for the first time.

“He was not playing a shift on the ice, so it doesn’t really matter. He was coaching, so it was nothing special,” said Rask, matter-of-factly.

So there wasn’t any added emotion for Rask going up against Julien’s new team for the first time?

“Nope,” said Rask.   

That line of questioning continued again after Tuesday’s practice at Warrior Ice Arena with Julien coming back to the Garden for the first time.

“Well, I can tell you what’s going to happen,” said Rask. “We’re going to start the game, at some point there’s going to be a video montage, we’re going to tap our sticks and the crowd is going to clap their hands and give him a warm welcome. Then the game is going to continue.”

Does Rask expect either he or some of his longtime teammates will get emotional if they see Julien showing some emotion during his ovation?

“No,” said Rask.

Is it really that cut-and-dry, the Bruins goaltender was asked?  

“It’s just another game,” said Rask, who improved to 8-15-3 lifetime against the Montreal Canadiens after last weekend’s shootout win. “It’s probably special for him to come back and be on the other side, but for us it’s just another game.”

Similarly, Marchand was much more understated speaking about Julien on Tuesday after speaking enthusiastically last weekend about the many discussions player and coach had about “becoming a better a pro” early in his career. But the Bruins winger wasn’t about to get all warm and fuzzy when asked about any greeting that his former coach is expected to get while the legendary Bruins/Habs rivalry plays out on the ice.

“I’m not really looking forward to it, but I’m sure he is,” said Marchand, when asked about the fan reception from Bruins fans awaiting Julien on Wednesday night. “It doesn’t really have anything to do with me, but I’m sure he’s excited to come back. He’s deserved that video and I’m sure a lot of people will be excited to see him again. I’m sure it will be a memorable game.”

Marchand went on to say he "learned a lot" from Julien during their time together, and clearly still has a high level of respect for his former coach. 

 Maybe it’s the very nature of the Bruins/Habs rivalry, or maybe the Bruins players are suffering from a little Claude Julien question fatigue with the two teams playing three times in a span of eight days. Maybe we're even finally seeing some of the Bruins players that had tired of the longtime coach's methods by the end of his long-running tenure in Boston. 

But it sure sounds like some longtime Bruins players might be over it when it comes to the “Claude Bowl” aspect of the ongoing rivalry week between the two storied rivals.  

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