Bruins

Haggerty: Who's got a shot to make the B's?

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Haggerty: Who's got a shot to make the B's?

By Joe Haggerty
CSNNE.com Bruins Insider Follow @hackswithhaggs
WILMINGTON So the million dollar question at the end of development camp is pretty simple.

Do any of the 24 youngsters aged 24 and under some of them way, way under advanced age of camp invitee Brett Olson have a shot at making the Boston Bruins club out of training camp when things get started in September?

Theres been a strong tradition of at least one player surprising each and every season with Peter Chiarelli and Claude Julien at the controls of the Black and Gold organization. Four years ago it was Milan Lucic coming straight out of Vancouver Giants as a 19-year-old and hes been a staple in Boston ever since. Three years ago Blake Wheeler jumped right from NCAA hockey into the NHL without even a second of minor league hockey, and that leap might have actually hurt his development a bit in the end.

Two years ago it was Johnny Boychuks turn to impress the Bruins staff and win a job with the Black and Gold, and last season spunky forward Brad Marchand wouldnt take no for an answer when it came to qualifying for the opening day roster in Prague.

Jordan Caron likewise impressed the Bruins enough to crack the opening day roster for Boston even if he wouldnt make it through the entire season, and Ryan Button pushed all the way through training camp until the very last cuts were made.

So it seems as if theres a pattern of at least one young Bs player surprising and seizing a roster spot where it might not have been the original plan.

Chiarelli was a little pessimistic about any of the young crop taking a job away from a Stanley Cup winning squad returning 18 players from the previous seasons championship roster, but stranger things have certainly happened in the game of hockey.

I dont want to kill any dreams that these kids have, but we have a whole other strata of players like the Jamie Arniels, the Jordan Carons, the Matt Bartkowskis. We have a whole level of players that are really close, said Chiarelli. But usually every year theres one or two players that flash. Like last year, Ryan Spooner stayed till the very end.

Now was it realistic that he was going to make it? Probably not, but he played so well that at least we talked about it. So in that sense there probably will be someone that is there and wows you. A player that forces you have to talk about it and think about it.

So who are the players likely to make Chiarelli, Don Sweeney, Jim Benning, Cam Neely, Claude Julien and the rest of the voices talk more about constructing Bostons roster with young talent come September?

There are some prime candidates from this years crop of development camp invitees, though first round pick Dougie Hamilton isnt likely to be one of them. The lanky 6-foot-5 defenseman is about 20 pounds and a year or two away from serious consideration for an NHL roster spot, and thats something pretty clearly understood by management and the player after a pretty solid opening performance in Bs development camp.

But 19-year-old forwards Jared Knight and Ryan Spooner are at the top of the list of players that could surprise if given the opportunity once regular training camp begins in September. Knight has NHL size for a winger at 5-foot-11 and 202 pounds of muscle, and he already skates, hits and shoots like a pro-style players after a couple of years with the OHLs London Knights.

Spooner was asked to get physically stronger after impressing Bs officials last fall throughout training camp, and hes done that while showing dedication and work ethic that Chiarelli, Don Sweeney and the rest of the Bs front office group truly appreciates.

For a guy like Ryan Spooner one of the things we told him at the end of last year, and at development camp and at training camp, was that he had to put the time in to get better, to get stronger, to get bigger, said Chiarelli. And he did. He did do that. All the testing showed that.

Theres still room to improve, but he could tell we take the testing very seriously. Ryan put the time in and you could see it in his play. He had a little more spring in his step with the puck and he had a little more bulk to protect the puck a little bit better. So you see it firsthand.

Knight was good during the development camp and tantalized with his missile of a one-time shot combined with fearless ability when it came to crashing the net and utilizing his NHL-ready body for offensive damage. He was a little more quiet in the two scrimmages once the action quickened up around him, but there is little reason to believe hes going to be anything less than very good once the real Bruins players show up for camp.

Theres no reason why the young guys shouldnt be encouraged," Sweeny said. "Weve had guys emerge out of our camp the first year and play. Bruins GM Peter Chiarelli has been very consistent that if a young man is ready to play and help his hockey club and help Bruins Head Coach Claude Julien in the areas that we want and weve identified -- then we make room. Blake Wheeler and right down a list of guys that have cracked our club. Knight and Spooner have things that were excited about and have things that they dont have the experience yet playing.

So theyll go through camps, play some exhibition games and see how they continue to react. But theres no reason why each and every one of those guys shouldnt be coming here and saying, I dont have to go back to junior.'

If both Knight and Spooner dont make the Bs, though, they will be going back to junior hockey for next season as 19-year-old prospects unable to play in the American Hockey League. So its Boston or bust for the forwards despite playing three games with the Providence Bruins last season on amateur tryout contracts.

Along the same lines as Spooner and Knight, defensemen Ryan Button and David Warsofsky are right in the mix with Matt Bartkowski and Steve Kampfer as young defensemen capable of impressing for that seventh defensemen post on the Boston roster headed into training camp. Chiarelli was particularly impressed with the way Button played during the second day of scrimmages in the development camp, and he leaves Boston with a pretty good taste in his mouth over the next six weeks.

Its only a temporary taste, however. Button, Warsofsky, Knight, Spooner and the rest of the Baby Bs prospect crew know its going to be an uphill battle to become a member of a Black and Gold tribe thats getting more and more established with each passing hockey season.

Joe Haggerty can be reached at jhaggerty@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Joe on Twitter at http:twitter.comHackswithHaggs.

Talking Points: DeBrusk provides energy in win

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Talking Points: DeBrusk provides energy in win

GOLD STAR: Jake DeBrusk gave the Bruins all kinds of energy out of the starting gate, and made a couple of plays that allowed his team to hold a lead despite getting outplayed in the opening 20 minutes. DeBrusk went hard to the net splitting a couple of San Jose defenders on the first goal, and fired a shot on net that created a rebound for Peter Cehlarik to cash in on. Then DeBrusk scored a little bit later on a rush where he beat Brent Burns in a foot race to a loose puck, then whistled a wrist shot past Aaron Dell for his fourth goal of the season. DeBrusk finished with a goal and two points along with a plus-2 and a team-high four shots on net while falling just short of 16 minutes of ice time in the victory. It was a strong effort from DeBrusk shortly after being a healthy scratch, and showed what he’s capable of when he gets his skating legs going.

BLACK EYE: Brent Burns was a complete mess for the Sharks. He was burnt by Jake DeBrusk in each of the first two Bruins goals in the first period with the B’s rookie going right at him with the attack. He also didn’t make it to the net with 12 of the 16 shots that he attempted and Burns finished with seven giveaways as well. It’s been a rough follow-up season for Burns after last year’s Norris Trophy season where he’s tried to do too much for the Sharks, and his game has suffered as a result. That seemed to be the case for Burns against the Bruins as well where his mistakes played a big role in the Sharks dropping the game.

TURNING POINT: The Bruins won the game when they managed to survive an opening 20 minutes where they were outshot 17-5, and even better they had a 2-1 lead based on some offensive fireworks from Jake DeBrusk. They were also aided by a couple of video reviews where the Bruins took a San Jose goal off the board when it was ruled that a crashing Joonas Donskoi punched a puck into the net with his glove. The Peter Cehlarik goal was also upheld at the other end after a challenge from the San Jose bench. It looked like DeBrusk was tripped before he partially crashed into Aaron Dell that set up the Cehlarik goal, and that’s clearly how the referees saw it after reviewing the play.

HONORABLE MENTION: It’s got to be Anton Khudobin, who stopped 36-of-37 shots and improved to 5-0-2 on the season with another strong win aided by a stalwart defensive effort in front of him. Khudobin now has 12 of the 20 points that the Bruins have amassed on the season, and he absolutely rewarded the B’s for opting to go with the Bruins backup for a second game in a row as they ride the hot goaltender. Khudobin was helped by a number of Bruins blocked shots in the third period when the game was still very tight, but it was also about Khudobin coming up with 16 saves in the first period when the Bruins were getting outplayed by the Sharks.

BY THE NUMBERS: 6 – the number of Bruins rookies that have scored their first NHL goals this season, including Peter Cehlarik finally getting his first NHL score Saturday night in his 14th career game.

QUOTE TO NOTE: “We need them. They’re in the lineup and they’re playing significant minutes. We need them to produce for us. Tonight we needed some offense early, and they provided it for us.” – Bruce Cassidy, on the role of the rookies in the win where it was all first-year players Peter Cehlarik, Jake DeBrusk and Danton Heinen doing the scoring vs. San Jose. 

Khudobin stops 36 shots to help Bruins beat Sharks, 3-1

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Khudobin stops 36 shots to help Bruins beat Sharks, 3-1

SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Anton Khudobin enjoyed getting pestered with shots early. He didn't have time to let his mind wander.

Khudobin stopped 36 shots to lead the Boston Bruins to a 3-1 victory over the San Jose Sharks on Saturday night.

"I like it busy," Khudobin said. "I don't have to think about anything else. The third-period start was unbelievable . . . I don't think I faced a shot until halfway through the period."

Peter CehlarikJake DeBrusk and Danton Heinen scored to help the Bruins get their second straight win after a four-game skid (0-3-1). Boston had totaled nine goals in its previous five games, scoring more than two for just the second time in nine November games.

"It went our way," Bruins coach Bruce Cassidy said. "They were clearly better than us but we come out 2-1 (in the three games on West Coast). If you stick with it, good things happen."

Khudobin remained unbeaten in regulation (5-0-2) and improved to 4-1 with a 0.99 goals-against average in five games against the Sharks.

Timo Meier scored and Aaron Dell finished with 18 saves for the Sharks, one of the lowest scoring teams in the league. San Jose has been held to two of fewer goals in five of their seven games this month.

"Guys in this room can score; we just have to do it," Sharks Logan Couture said. "I thought we had good chances and a lot of them at the end. We've got to create offense. If you don't score goals, you're not going to win."

Meier gave the Sharks, losers of two straight following wins in six of seven, a short-lived 1-0 lead after tapping in a rebound 4:50 into the game. Daniel O'Regan, making his season debut, won the puck behind the net and skated around to take the shot that bounced to Meier. It was O'Regan's first career assist and second career point.

"I just kind of fished it out and wanted to bring it to the net," O'Regan said. "Timo made a nice finish."

Cehlarik, in his 14th game, scored his first career goal about 1 1/2 minutes later to tie it for the Bruins.

Boston took the lead on DeBrusk's goal with 9:14 left in the first. Charlie McAvoy cleared a puck in his zone that DeBrusk, one of three rookies who scored, chased down and easily beat Dell 1-on-1.

"It's massive," DeBrusk said. "We all want it so bad and we all work so hard. These are big games for us."

Heinen made it 3-1 with 5:51 left in the third. Kevan Miller skated down the ice, drawing all the attention on the right side. He passed across the crease, from where Heinen tapped it in.

"He made a heck of a play," Heinen said. "I just put my stick on the ice."

The Sharks had a goal negated for the second straight game, this one two minutes in.

"We got enough looks tonight to score," Sharks coach Peter DeBoer said. "We're doing more good than bad we're just not being rewarded."

NOTES: O'Regan was recalled before the game. He's the leading scorer for the Barracuda of the AHL. ... The Sharks have had three consecutive goals reversed after challenges dating to Thursday's game against the Florida Panthers. ... Sharks F Joel Ward has recorded points in six of his last eight games. ... DeBrusk, who assisted on Cehlarik's goal, recorded his first multi-point game since Oct. 14, a span of 14 games.

UP NEXT

Bruins: At the New Jersey Devils on Wednesday night.

Sharks: Host the Anaheim Ducks on Monday night.

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