Red Sox

Notes: Pedroia's HR extends hit streak in final AB

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Notes: Pedroia's HR extends hit streak in final AB

By Maureen Mullen
CSNNE.com Follow @maureenamullen
By Joe Haggerty
CSNNE.com Bruins Insider Follow @hackswithhaggs

BOSTON Things didnt look good for Dustin Pedroia in his final at bat of the day.

It looked like the Sox second basemans hitting streak might be over when he ambled up to the plate already 0-for-2 with a walk in the eighth inning of Thursdays 4-3 loss to the Royals.

But it should have been a harbinger of good things to come when the Fenway Faithful interrupted the traditional singing of Sweet Caroline between halves of the eighth inning to support their little infield general. While the excitement was tempered because the Sox had dropped the game, Terry Francona still recognized the special moment that took place between his diminutive franchise player and the crowd thats adored him so thoroughly during his career in Boston.

I do think our fans are pretty special," Francona said. "They react to things like Dustin Pedroias hit streak. Thats what makes them so great. We dont need President races or mustard racing ketchup. Our fans love baseball and I think thats pretty cool . . . nothing against mustard.

The cheering and ovations began before Pedroia was even announced as the first batter of the inning, and he followed with a dramatic at bat. Pedroia fouled off a couple of nasty outside fastballs from Greg Holland before working the count full.

Then Pedroia found a fastball right around the letters and crushed the 96-mph offering into the Green Monster seats for a solo home run to extend the hitting streak to a career-high 25 games.

I was just trying to get on base," Perdria said. "Holland has great stuff and Im already at a disadvantage there. I just wanted to put together a good at bat. With a 3-2 count I was looking for a fastball and I was just lucky to get the barrel of the bat on it.

Were down two runs. Were trying to win the game. Thats the most important thing we were trying to do there.

The 25-game hitting streak is the longest hitting tear in the American League this season and the third longest in the big leagues. Its also tied for the third-longest by an American League second basemen since 1919, and the longest since Joe Gordons 29-game hitting streak in 1942.

Outfielder Carl Crawford has been playing through a strained left elbow since coming off the 15-day disabled list this month, and was out of the starting lineup over the last two days due to a cortisone shot administered to the elbow on Tuesday.

Crawford said he originally hurt the elbow while continuing rehab from the hamstring injury that landed him on the DL, and it finally got to the point where he needed some medical attention.

The Sox left fielder said hes never had a cortisone shot in his elbow before, and was hoping hed never need another one.

During rehab when I was throwing it got kind of sore when I was doing long toss, said Crawford. I was hoping it would go away at some point and it didnt. So thats why we got the shot."

Crawford pinch hit in the bottom of the ninth inning of Thursdays loss to the Kansas City Royals, and said he should be ready to return to full-time duty this weekend against the Chicago White Sox. His at bat in the ninth inning nearly became the game-winner when he lifted a Joakim Soria breaking ball deep to the right field warning track, but somehow the ball died with the wind blowing despite the cheers and coaxing from the entire Sox bench.

A Crawford home run would have given the Sox a walk-off win against the Royals, but instead Jeff Francouer tracked the ball back in the sun and somehow made a basket catch of the ball.

In that situation you just try to put everything in the past and focus on getting a hit, said Crawford. Normally when I hit it like I thought it was good enough for a home run. I dont know if it died or if I didnt hit it as well as I thought I did . . . I dont know what happened out there.

There is no update yet on right-hander Clay Buchholz, who has been on the disabled list since June 17 with a lower back strain. He is expected to see a specialist within the next few days.

The best way I think I can answer that is that its not been the simplest muscle strain, said manager Terry Francona. I think thats pretty obvious. I meant what I said yesterday: he threw great. He really did. It looked like he was in midseason form but its not been the simplest muscle strain Ive ever seen. Were serious, we want to have everything answered before we turn him loose because if we turn him loose, we dont want to turn back. At the same time we want to take care of him. Thats kind of how I felt yesterday and still feel that way and I think our medical people do too.

Francona is not concerned, for the time being, that Buchholz would not pitch again this season.

Hes a really good pitcher, Francona said. Its hard to answer questions like that. If you asked me when Carl was outCarl is one of our best playersbut the way Josh Reddick played. The guys hitting .430 in his absence. So you never know. Dont want to ever have anybody out.

Shortstop Marco Scutaro was also out of the starting lineup for the finale. He was the only member of the starting lineup who did not get a hit in Wednesdays 16-hit win over the Royals.

I think it'll be good for him, Francona said. Some of the guys have gotten a day. Carls got a couple now, Jacoby a half. Youk. Think well go into Chicago feeling a little bit better.

With the July 31 trade deadline approaching, Francona said he has not noticed the anxiety level in the clubhouse to be as high as it has in past years.

The guys know if they've been around here how things work, Francona said. That were always going to try to get better, which I think players probably appreciate. Theres probably a certain level of excitementin those things.

It used to be on the flip side when I was with the Phillies, knowing that we were kind of on the outside looking in, a little bit envious. I think the guys that there is some anxiety is when theyre reading their name and its probably not every guy, but certain guys I can understand that. Its affecting your livelihood, where you're going to work, things like that. I think its nice when it settles down. This yearit hasnt seemed like its been front and center.

Several reports have linked the Red Sox to Seattle Mariners lefty Erik Bedard (4-6, 3.00 ERA) in trade talks, and a source confirmed to CSNNE.com that indeed there have been discussions between the two teams about the oft-injured Canadian southpaw. Seattle sent scouts this week to Pawtucket and Portland to evaluate younger players potentially available for the southpaw starter, and the demand may become much greater for a starting pitcher in Boston if Clay Buchholzs back condition doesnt improve considerably.

The Sox have also been linked to Hiroki Kuroda, Rich Harden and Ubaldo Jimenez in trade talks over the last weeks, but dont appear willing to spend top dollar to acquire any of them. With Andrew Miller and Tim Wakefield both struggling and John Lackey unreliable against elite offensive lineups, the Sox may be forced to do something with Buchholzs continued status as a health question mark.

Sox reliever Matt Albers pitched an inning of scoreless relief in Thursdays loss to the Kansas City Royals and extended his season-high scoreless streak to 13 13 innings pitched with 16 strikeouts over a career-high 10 straight scoreless appearances dating back to July 1. Albers has basically stepped into the bullpen role originally designated for Bobby Jenks before the season began, and never looked back with a 2.09 ERA this season.

The two-run single for Jacoby Ellsbury in the third inning gave the center fielder a career-high in RBI with 62 RBI on the season, and more than two months of games left to go. Ellsburys previous career-high for a season was 60 RBI in the 2009 baseball season.

Maureen Mullen is on Twitter at http:twitter.commaureenamullen
Joe Haggerty can be reached at jhaggerty@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Joe on Twitter at http:twitter.comHackswithHaggs

Tyler Thornburg wants a normal spring, but don't be surprised if it's bumpy

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Tyler Thornburg wants a normal spring, but don't be surprised if it's bumpy

MASHANTUCKET, Conn. — Don’t confuse the goal of a normal spring training with the likelihood one will follow.

Tyler Thornburg’s time with the Red Sox has been an ordeal. He’s optimistic he can have a regular spring training after undergoing surgery to treat thoracic outlet syndrome in June, a surgery that included the removal of a rib which is now on display at his parents’ house. 

He said Saturday, in fact, there’s a “very good chance” of a normal spring. But there’s also a chance his build up to regular-season form runs unevenly. And that would be OK.

“I started throwing Oct. 2, that’s when they kind of gave me the go-ahead to go tossing,” Thornburg said Saturday at Winter Weekend. “So I’ve been building up slowly since then, just trying to make sure we don’t have any setbacks or things like that, and ramp it up at a good pace. I’m throwing at 120-140 feet, so it’s about the pace I’d normally be on, granted I’d know 100 percent before where I was [under normal circumstances]. So things could be a little different."

Consider a few other things Thornburg said Saturday at Foxwoods.

“I don’t really think any of us really know how quick I’m going to bounce back necessarily as far as how quickly the recovery’s going to go in spring training after an outing,” Thornburg said. “But hopefully I mean it’s fantastic, and we can kind of just keep going.”

A bit of natural uncertainty. He missed an entire season, and the reason he missed an entire season is had a lot going on medically. 

What appeared to be a shoulder injury was far from your usual, say, rotator cuff matter. His was a nerve issue.

“Two of the neck muscles were incredibly hypertrophied, like overgrown, and they just started squeezing on the brachial plexus, where all the nerves run down,” Thornburg said. “I’d be sitting there watching a game and just a nerve thing would hit me and I’d almost get knocked over by it. As well as the first rib was getting pulled up and my hand would just turn red some days if I was just standing there, cutting off the blood circulation. Then all the scar tissue and buildup along the nerves they had to go and dissect all that off there.”

So the injury wasn’t simple, and now, the recovery process is really a whole body matter. 

"There’s a lot off things your arm has to get used to between using different muscles, as well as my arm was kind of working through a scenario where it was trying to overcompensate for this and [trying] to relieve that,” Thornburg said. “So just worked a different way. Now your body has to remember how to actually properly work again. It’s a lot of neuromuscular stuff.”

Thornburg noted the possibility too he could be ready to go to start the season but not really ready to go back to back yet. Would the Sox then carry him on the big league roster, or continue to build him up elsewhere? 

Velocity won’t be there right away for Thornburg, he said: “But I mean that’s what spring training is for for most guys anyway.”

There’s a lot of optimism, but naturally, there’s a lot to be seen. 

“The rehab process, it's been a massive rollercoaster,” Thornburg said. “It really has. But I mean, I've been trying to take it week to week which has been a lot easier. There's the good days and bad days, just different kinds.”

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Kimbrel's newborn daughter treated in Boston for heart condition

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Kimbrel's newborn daughter treated in Boston for heart condition

MASHANTUCKET, Conn. — Coming off a phenomenal season, Red Sox closer Craig Kimbrel spent the offseason in Boston. Not to be closer to Fenway Park, but for proximity to something far more important: the city’s first-rate medical community.

Kimbrel’s daughter, Lydia Joy, was born in November with a heart issue.

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“It’s been a lot,” Kimbrel said Saturday at Red Sox Winter Weekend at Foxwoods. “My wife and I, we’ve kept it kind of private. But when she was born, she had some heart defects so we decided to stay in Boston and work with Children’s Hospital and just been going through that ordeal and it’s had its ups and downs but she’s doing great right now."

Focusing wasn't always easy in season, but Kimbrel said his daughter's condition has motivated him even more.

“They always say when you have a child, things change and they have," he said. "I’m definitely more focused towards her and her needs and our family needs. It’s just one day at a time and give everything I got. It’s real easy to look at her and understand everything I’m doing is for her and it makes it a lot easier.”

Kimbrel and his wife, Ashley, found out early in the 2017 season that they would be staying in Boston for the winter and were preparing.

“Everything has kind of gone as planned so far,” Kimbrel said. “She’ll have another surgery during spring training, so I’ll come back to Boston for a week and do that, but it’s been good. It’s definitely been tough, but one of the happiest, joyful times of our life.”

"Being in Boston, we feel blessed, because the doctors are the best in the world. Being able to work with them has been great.”

Kimbrel said his wife has stayed in touch with Travis Shaw’s wife. The Shaw family has had a similar experience, Kimbrel said.

“It seems like they’re doing pretty good,” Kimbrel said. “It’s been very encouraging to see.”

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