Morning Skate: Dream come true for 10-year-old Babson 'rookie'


Morning Skate: Dream come true for 10-year-old Babson 'rookie'

Here are all the links from around the hockey world while passing along all the happiness at the great start for the Vegas Golden Knights to start the season.

*Congrats to the Babson College hockey team and 10-year-old Coleman Walsh after Coleman was made an honorary member of the Division III team on Tuesday in an “inspirational draft day” organized by the non-profit Team IMPACT. Coleman has endured a pair of open-heart surgeries after he was born with Williams Syndrome, a developmental disorder that affects numerous parts of the body. Doctors now constantly monitor his cardiac condition.

He also developed a deep love of hockey in those sometimes difficult times and even spends time in the summer watching hockey highlights on YouTube and has memorized all 31 of the goal horns in arenas across the NHL.

“I can’t wait to be involved in the practices and the games,” said Coleman, a fourth-grader who lives in Walpole, Mass., with his parents Nanci and Matt and his older brother Andrew. “I love all the excitement [of hockey] and lots of stuff. I love the hitting and the fast-skating, and I really like the Jumbotron too.”

Coleman’s favorite hockey player is Zdeno Chara (“I like how strong and smart he is”), and he said he faithfully goes to one Bruins game a season with his family. 

Now, he’ll be seeing a lot more hockey as the connection with the Babson team means he’ll be spending practice and game time with the young men at least a few times a month. In a cool touch, Anaheim Ducks forward and Wellesley native Chris Wagner made a video for Coleman and his family welcoming them to a Babson team that includes his younger brother, Paul.

“We’re so excited to be able to do this as a family,” said Nanci Walsh. “Things that are important to Coleman are being a part of the community and doing the things that he’s interested in, and it’s not as simple for us as signing him up for something considering his disabilities and health. 

“For him to be able to be on a team, see what teammates do for one another and be around these young men that are so giving and generous with their time, it’s really exciting for him and for us. Hockey is his real passion, and it’s the one sport that he thinks about all the time and talks about all the time. It’s the one thing that carries through as a big part of him.”

To hear Team IMPACT Executive Director Seth Rosenzweig tell it, while Coleman becomes a member of the team, his whole family gets drafted by the program and will become part of that unique, bonding that only sports can provide.

“The ultimate goal is for [Coleman] to not only come out of with some good stories but also to develop his goals around confidence, coping mechanisms and the tools that will allow him to have his most successful life possible,” said Rosenzweig. “We also know this will have a huge impact on the family that will all be actively involved in the program and that it will have a big impact on these college athletes around character, integrity, empathy and perspective while also hopefully getting them thinking about philanthropy and civic-mindedness. It’s kind of a win, win, win.

“We’ve had a lot of success with hockey. It’s the right-sized team where everybody that’s on the team can develop a relationship with the family. It’s not too big and not too small. [The hockey players] have that fight and grit in them which is a common characteristic, and I think we’ve found that the hockey teams will go a little above and beyond what’s required in the partnership with the kids.”

According to Rosenzweig, Team IMPACT has almost 1,300 kids like Coleman in the program and more than 500 colleges and universities in 47 states partnering with them. Rosenzweig said the challenge at this point is getting the word out to families with children battling life-threatening or chronic illnesses to let them know that these opportunities with college teams and college athletes are there if the timing is right. For more information about Team Impact, people can go to if they’d like to get involved.  

*Stop me if you’ve heard this before, but Claude Julien is saying the Canadiens are having a hard time putting the puck in the net after another loss to start the season. And the power play is dreadful too. Man, it doesn’t sound good in Montreal right now.

*Elliotte Friedman has his thoughts from around the NHL after the first week, including the future arena hopes for the New York Islanders.

*Here’s a philosophical question for you: Did a hockey team really visit the White House if their team Twitter account basically ignored the whole thing? It was such a weird approach to this whole thing by the Penguins.

*Alex Burrows got a nice hand from the Canucks crowd in his first trip back to Vancouver since becoming a member of the Ottawa Senators. I wonder if he bit anybody in celebration of the big moment.

*The Edmonton Oilers are finding that things are a little difficult this time around after last season’s success.

*For something completely different: Here’s another hilarious episode of “The Camera Guys” with Moose’s beard playing an inspirational role.



NHL still debating possible discipline on Schenn-Krejci collision

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NHL still debating possible discipline on Schenn-Krejci collision

The NHL Department of Player Safety is still debating if supplemental discipline is needed for the Blues'  Brayden Schenn for the violent hit he delivered to the Bruins' David Krejci in the B's 2-1 overtime loss in St. Louis on Wednesday night. 

In the second period, Schenn clobbered David Krejci in the corner with a punishing hit to the head as the B’s playmaking center was facing him immediately after releasing the puck. Schenn was whistled for a two-minute minor for charging at the time of the collision, but luckily Krejci was able to remain in the game and played 15:54 of ice time in the loss.

Upon further review, it was very clearly a big, heavy hit delivered to Krejci’s head, but there were plenty of mitigating factors. Krejci had his head down until the last second while looking down at the puck on his stick and was hunched over as Schenn moved in to deliver a check on a player eligible to be hit. Schenn’s skates left the ice to finish the hit after impact, which made the collision look even worse to the casual observer, but that isn’t considered launching into a hit by the NHL’s standards.

Adding to the equation is that Schenn has been suspended twice by the NHL before, three games in 2016 for a charging hit on TJ Oshie and one game back in 2013.

Clearly, it’s a difficult call for the league as they try to deter hits to the head and reduce the number of concussions. Still, this would appear to be another situation where, as the league says, a player “assumed a posture that made head contact on an otherwise full body check unavoidable." It’s absolutely similar to the Patrick Hornqvist/Charlie McAvoy hit from a few weeks ago that never ended up with any supplemental discipline for the Penguins hard-hitter despite plenty of hue and cry from the Bruins fans.

So what does everybody else think about this hit, and whether or not Schenn should be facing discipline from the NHL as a result of it?


Talking points: Ryan Donato's goal helps Bruins clinch playoff berth

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Talking points: Ryan Donato's goal helps Bruins clinch playoff berth

GOLD STAR: Jaden Schwartz stepped up and won the game for the Blues with a couple of really good plays in the third period and overtime. He took advantage of a line change and a lax Bruins defense to snap a shot past Anton Khudobin from the face-off circle in the third period that tied up the game, and then went on a one-man rush in overtime before blasting a puck past Khudobin for the game-winner on a beautiful individual play. Schwartz finished with the two goals that represented all of the St. Louis offense, four shots on net, a hit and a takeaway in 20:02 of ice time while logging a plus-2 rating as well. The Blues clearly needed somebody to step up to the plate with Vladimir Tarasenko and the Schwartz was with St. Louis on Wednesday night.

BLACK EYE: The Bruins were quite literally black and blue after a physical, punishing game with the St. Louis Blues. A number of players took heavy hits against a St. Louis team that felt free to throw hits and take runs with Zdeno Chara and David Backes out of Boston’s lineup among other players, and that culminated with Brayden Schenn drilling David Krejci in the second period. It was a hit that earned Schenn a two minute penalty for charging midway through the period, but shouldn’t result in anything more for the Blues forward. The hit wasn’t late, his skates were on the ice when he made contact, and Krejci was crouched down when Schenn made impact on a heavy check with his elbows tucked in, so it looked like a relatively clean hit that isn’t going to be on the radar of the NHL’s Player Safety Department. That physicality for the Blues really seemed to slow down the Bruins a little bit as things went on over the 60 plus minutes of the overtime game.


TURNING POINT: The Bruins actually only got outshot by a 15-13 margin in the second period, third period and overtime, but it was clear that they slowed down in terms of attacking and creating chances as things moved on in the game. By the latter half of the game the Bruins were simply trying to hang on to their one-goal lead, and then after that simply trying to hang in there for the point earned by getting to overtime. They managed to do it, but it was a different wave of momentum in the game once the Blues tied things up in the third period on Schwartz’s first goal. After that the Bruins were scrambling and hanging on, and did just enough to hang in there for a single overtime point for the second game in a row.

HONORABLE MENTION: Ryan Donato made it two goals in two games when he stepped into a loose puck created by an Alex Pietrangelo turnover that bounced off referee Brad Watson after he attempted to throw a puck up the middle of the ice. Donato pounced on the fortuitous bounce and rocked a puck on edge past Jake Allen for the game’s first goal and another affirmation that the 21-year-old can both shoot and score. Donato was pretty quiet after that goal, of course, with a couple of shots on net, but it seemed like a big, heavy hit on him by Dmitri Jaskin in the second period kind of quieted the youngster down a little bit. Still, you’ve got to love the production from a player just getting his feet wet at the NHL level.

BY THE NUMBERS: 100 – The number of points for the Bruins after falling in overtime by a 2-1 score to the Blues, and in getting to the century mark the B’s clinched a playoff spot for the second season in a row.

QUOTE TO NOTE: “It’s step one. Going into the season we wanted to make the playoffs and be a Stanley Cup contender. Right now we got in and we’re going to be a contender, right? Now it’s about being in the best position possible going forward.” –Bruce Cassidy, to reporters in St. Louis about clinching the playoff spot on Wednesday night.