Bruins

Morning Skate: Sinden happy to see Jacobs headed to Hall

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Morning Skate: Sinden happy to see Jacobs headed to Hall

NEW YORK - Here are all the links from around the hockey world, and what I’m reading, while happy to be friends with New York City, even if I don’t "heart" New York like the sign says at the airport when you land.

*Good piece from FOH (Friend of Haggs) Dave Stubbs on Harry Sinden happy that his longtime boss, Jeremy Jacobs is getting recognized by the Hockey Hall of Fame. Sinden was the face of Jacobs ownership in Boston for a long, long time and together they put a lot of playoff teams on the ice year in and year out, even if the Cups didn’t follow in the late 1970’s, 1980’s or 1990’s as well.  

*Roberto Luongo talks to my good buddy Chuck Gormley about his Italian heritage, his Twitter following and other things, but I’m not sure they got to the tire pumping.

*Apparently, the Toronto Maple Leafs were messing with the signage at one of their road arenas, and it’s caused a ripple with the hockey people in Canada.

*PHT writer James O’Brien has Washington Capitals backup goalie Philipp Grubauer dropping F-bombs after losing another game this season.

*There isn’t much to dislike about Colton Parayko’s game, but his five-on-five numbers haven’t really lived up to the hype thus far.

*For something completely different: Count me as bummed if the whole “Dark Universe” thing doesn’t happen. I actually liked the Mummy and thought they were on the right track with the whole shared monster universe thing.

 

 
 

Riley Nash has made it a season of filling in for Bergeron

Riley Nash has made it a season of filling in for Bergeron

BOSTON – The Bruins have talked glowingly on plenty of occasions about their overall team depth at the NHL level and certainly also about their organizational depth when it comes to being well-represented at all levels of hockey. That NHL roster depth was front and center on Thursday night in Toronto as the B’s effectively shook off a last-minute injury to Patrice Bergeron (upper body) that kept him out of the lineup for Game 4, and managed to overcome with a 3-1 win over the Maple Leafs at the Air Canada Centre. 

Riley Nash stood as one of the main reasons the B’s came out on top in Game 4 vs. Toronto while filling in at top line center for the absent No. 37 just as he’s done throughout the regular season while helping Boston put up a very unlikely 13-5-2 record this year when Bergeron is injured.

“He’s been a real good player for us. I don’t know if I’d call him an unknown, but he’s a guy that’s really elevated his game this season as it’s went along,” said Bruce Cassidy. “Some of that has been opportunity. When Bergeron goes out, he has a chance to play with Marchand and Pastrnak. You saw it. He’s done a really good job when we’ve put him in there. He’s had a little bit more of an opportunity to have an offensive role. 

“It’s always been in him, but it’s up to the player to bring it out and it’s up the coaching staff to put him in those positions if the situation dictates and encourage them to do it. I think we’ve met halfway there and it’s worked out well for him.”

Nash didn’t end up on the score sheet for the pivotal Game 4 win, but what he did do what was win an ultra-important D-zone face-off that set up Brad Marchand’s game-winning goal. 

After a long shift, the Bruins were whistled for icing and stuck out there for Nash to take a draw against Auston Matthews in the defensive zone. It appeared to be a pretty good spot for the Leafs, but instead Nash won the draw, Adam McQuaid threw a puck up the boards and David Pastrnak beat a pinching Jake Gardiner to turn it into a 2-on-1 odd-man rush. 

Pastrnak fed Marchand with a no-look dish when everything in the building thought he’d shoot the puck, and Marchand buried a shot that permanently turned the momentum in the game. It was clearly a pivotal play in the game, but it was Nash’s understated, important role in the play that does a good job of representing what he’s meant to the Bruins this season. 

“That was one [face-off] where you just try and battle,” said Nash. “You don’t expect the outcome that we got out of that. “It’s baptism by fire [filling in for Bergeron]. You’re thrown in there and you’ve gotta get it done.”

HAGGERTY: Rask authors one of his best big-game performances

Nash put up career highs in goals (15 goals) and points (41 points) during the regular season mostly centering the third line, but he was also the perfect candidate to play the role of poor man’s Bergeron with his strong two-way play, good skill level and smart, efficient style he employs on the ice. That’s something he’s done with aplomb all year, and it gives the Bruins confidence they have an option when their best player has to sit out due to injury. 

Clearly, the B’s aren’t as explosive offensively or as dominant puck possession-wise when Nash is filling in for Bergeron, but it’s tough to argue with the won-loss record when that’s been the case this season.

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DeBrusk sparkles in first steps on postseason stage

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File Photo

DeBrusk sparkles in first steps on postseason stage

TORONTO -- It will go down as the big insurance goal in Boston’s titanic Game 4 against the Toronto Maple Leafs, but it was also another stamp on the NHL rookie passport for Jake DeBrusk.

DeBrusk scored his second goal of the postseason finishing off a sweet David Krejci setup on a transition play in the third period of Thursday night’s game, giving the Bruins the insurance goal they needed in a 3-1 victory, and spent the moments afterward thinking about just how fortunate he’s been in this first NHL campaign.

“I knew it was coming the whole time, but the defensemen kind of slid and I saw the puck in the air,” said DeBrusk. “That’s just [Krejci] doing his thing and the next thing I knew the puck was on my tape. I had a wide-open net and I don’t know too many guys that are going to miss that. It was a gritty play by him, and that’s why he’s been who he’s been during his time with the Bruins. He’s a special player and he’s special for me to play with.”

The 21-year-old kid has already passed his old man, former NHL tough guy and current Canadian TV analyst Louie DeBrusk, in career NHL playoff points, and is on a team that’s one game away from advancing to the second round. For the Bruins, the two goals in four playoff games has been solid production from a youngster who's been arguably the best player on his forward line to this point in the series.

MORE HAGGERTY

Actually, it’s not much of an argument. DeBrusk has been the best player on his line to date, and that means he’s been leading the way for much bigger names like Krejci and Rick Nash in a playoff run where the Bruins will need more overall from their second line.

“It’s nice . . . to see these young guys enjoying the moment,” said coach BruceCassidy. “We saw it with Charlie [McAvoy] last year. They’re learning how to play winning hockey in April, and hopefully into May and June. That’s the idea. Because they’re in the lineup and we trust them to play ‘X’ number of minutes, [and] that’s what’s going to be required for us to be successful.

“They certainly don’t have to lead our team, and we’re not relying on them every night to lead our team. But just do your part, play hard and play well, play the right way this time of year and you’ll get opportunities to grow. Jake is finding it a bit offensively. The puck is finding him. It was a great play by Krejci and he had a couple of good looks. It’s working out well for him, and we’re going to need it because we can’t rely on just one line to score all our goals.”

For a hockey nut like DeBrusk, this is “pinch me” territory.

“I think I’m settling in okay. I enjoy it,” said DeBrusk, who led the Bruins with seven hits in a physical, board-battle filled effort that ended with his nifty finish around the net in the final period. “I like the physical intensity and everything [the playoffs] brings: The noise, the energy and pretty much everything about it. It’s what you play for.

"I’m really lucky to have this opportunity in my rookie year and on this team, and where I am in the lineup. I understand that as well so I’m just trying to enjoy every moment of it. You don’t really enjoy it when you lose, but you sure do when you win.”

If it turns out to be a long playoff run, there will certainly be other chances for different rookies to have their moments; there are so many of them on the B’s, ranging from McAvoy to Danton Heinen to Matt Grzelcyk to Sean Kuraly and even to Ryan Donato, who's currently out of the lineup. But it’s DeBrusk who's the rookie with the most veteran-like game who's off to a fast start in the postseason, and really seizing the rare rookie opportunity being given to him by the Bruins right now.

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