Patriots

Celtics' Johnson stays patient, waits for opportunity

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Celtics' Johnson stays patient, waits for opportunity

INDIANAPOLIS JaJuan Johnson received plenty of advice from folks in preparation for his first NBA season.

None of the conversations centered around the need for patience, something Johnson is learning he'll need plenty of this season.

"People say my time will come," Johnson, who is from Indianapolis and played at nearby Purdue, told CSNNE.com. "I know it will. When it happens, I'll be ready."

Johnson's time to shine may be tonight as the Boston Celtics try to snap a three-game losing skid against the Indiana Pacers.

Boston's Kevin Garnett had a noticeable limp following Friday's loss to Chicago. It is unclear if Garnett will play tonight. Even if he does, his minutes may be even more limited than they already are currently.

The C's will surely be looking for some kind of spark off the bench. For Johnson, it would be a fitting time and place for that to happen.

With hundreds of family and friends in the stands, Johnson would love nothing more than to get an opportunity to play decent minutes in front of so many of the people who supported him at Purdue.

Most of Johnson's days are spent on the scout team, well aware that his chances of playing most nights aren't very good.

"Obviously, I'd like to play more," he said. "But it's definitely valuable stuff I probably couldn't get on another team, just from playing behind KG (Kevin Garnett) and learning from a point guard like (Rajon) Rondo. Those are the kind of things, you really can't get from a lot of teams. I'm fortunate enough to have the opportunity to learn from those guys and other veterans."

And while patience may not have been a topic of discussion prior to entering the NBA, Johnson says this isn't the first time he has started a season buried on the depth chart.

"It reminds me a lot of my freshman year of college," Johnson said.

There were a couple players ahead of him on the depth chart, so he didn't play a lot of minutes at first.

The following year? - First team, All-Big 10.

Celtics coach Doc Rivers has been impressed with Johnson's work ethic, which is essential for a young player who isn't playing much early in their career. As long as Johnson continues to work at becoming a better player, the Celtics coaching staff will continue pushing him to reach his full potential as a player.

"We're patient with young guys, as long as young guys want to be taught," Rivers said. "It took me about a year of coaching to realize potential with character turns out to be good player. Potential with no character turns out to be the guy that keeps being traded. You get impatient with that, where you try to get a guy to be a better player, and they can't get out of themselves; they're so much into themselves, they're unteachable."

That doesn't appear to be an issue with Johnson, who has been taken under the wing of Kevin Garnett.

"Not playing does nothing but motivate me," Johnson said. "I just want to get better and learn as much as I can. I'm not satisfied by many means in not playing. I just work even harder. That's my mentality. That's how it's always been."

BEST OF BST PODCAST: Patriots advance to Super Bowl LII vs. Eagles

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BEST OF BST PODCAST: Patriots advance to Super Bowl LII vs. Eagles

0:41 - Tom Curran, Michael Holley, and Tom Giles discuss the Patriots comeback victory vs. the Jaguars in the AFC Championship game to advance to the Super Bowl and Tom Brady’s ability to lead the Patriots to a win when trailing late in games.

5:56 - Tom Curran and Michael Hurley talk about Danny Amendola’s clutch catches in the playoffs, and how he has become one of Tom Brady’s favorite targets in big games. 

10:33 - Jeff Howe joins BST to discuss Tom Brady never scoring in the 1st quarter of the Super Bowl and if that could change vs. the Eagles. 

14:48 - Holley, Giles, and Howe talk about Eagles offensive tackle Lane Johnson’s comments saying he wants to “dethrone” the “pretty boy” Tom Brady. 

Marc Savard officially retires from NHL seven years after last game

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Marc Savard officially retires from NHL seven years after last game

It was a foregone conclusion because he hadn’t played an NHL game in seven years since suffering a final concussion whole playing for the Bruins, but Marc Savard called it a career on Monday by officially retiring from the NHL.

Savard played 13 NHL seasons for four different teams and was one of two heralded free agents to sign with the Bruins in 2006 along with defenseman Zdeno Chara.

Savard effectively had his career ended by a nasty head shot delivered by Penguins cheap shot artist Matt Cooke in the spring of 2010, but came back to play 25 games in 2010-11 for Boston the following season.

A Matt Hunwick hit delivered afterwards in Colorado was the final blow.

It was the Cooke hit on Savard that spurred the NHL on the very next season to finally begin outlawing blindside hits and any kind of illegal hits targeting the head.

Savard still had his name included among the Bruins immortalized on the Stanley Cup when the B’s won it in 2011, and was forced to prolong his retirement announcement due to the seven year, $28.15 million contract extension he signed with Boston back in 2009. His contract was included in trades with the Florida Panthers and New Jersey Devils over the last few seasons, but it officially expired at the end of last season.

So the 40-year-old Savard officially announced his retirement on his twitter account: “While I, unfortunately, haven’t been able to play since January 2011 after suffering a career-ending concussion, and with my NHL contract recently expiring, I’d like to officially announce my retirement from the National Hockey League. I wish to thank the New York Rangers, the Calgary Flames, the Atlanta Thrashers and the Boston Bruins organizations for giving me the opportunity to play in the NHL for 13 incredible seasons. I owe everything that my family and I enjoy today to the great game of hockey. It has been a wild and wonderful journey, and one I’ll remember forever. It is impossible for me to give credit to all of the people who have contributed in so many ways to my career, but to those that believed in me, and helped me believe in myself, I’d like to thank you from the bottom of my heart. I believe I can make a positive impact in the world. I love hockey, and I will forever have a passion for this game. I look forward to the chances I may have to give back to the game that has given me so much. I’ve learned a thing or two from some great people throughout my career and life, and I look forward to a chance to pass that along to others. This is not an easy thing for me to put down into words, but I feel as though I’m ready now for the next chapter in my life to begin. Also, last but not least my health is the best it’s been in a very long time and I’m grateful for that.”

The best news for Bruins fans and any fans of Savard is that many of the post-concussion symptoms appear to have lessened, or disappeared, over the years away from the ice. Savard coached his sons at the junior level in Canada once he stepped away from playing, and it sounds like he’s feeling good enough now to purse the coaching thing with a little more fervor.

“I think the biggest thing is that I’m happy where I am in my life,” said Savard to NHLPA.com. “I’m the healthiest I’ve been in a long time. I didn’t want it to linger on any more. My contract is up and I wanted to get it out there and head off in a different direction to pursue a coaching career.”

Savard finished with 207 goals and 706 points in 807 games during his NHL career, but there’s no telling what those final numbers could have been given his offensive skills, his creativity and his place on a Bruins team just beginning to get rolling offensively. Those high-flying days were a long time ago for Savard, however, and it’s good to hear that he’s simply healthy and very much looking forward to the next steps in his life.  

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