Celtics

About TOMBOY

About TOMBOY

Equal opportunities and mutual respect for women and girls stand among the most hotly contested social issues in America. The divisions that exist affect the development of confidence, disturb corporate boardrooms and even disrupt presidential politics. In the testosterone-heavy sports world, the journey of the female athlete is often discouraging, and despite progress achieved during the Title IX era, gender equity in athletics has a long way to go.

In TOMBOY, CSN explores female participation in organized sports and the challenges faced at every level. From the obstacles that young girls encounter at the recreational stage, to the stereotypes, language issues and cultural disparities that follow, and ultimately the insufficient media coverage and compensation that afflicts elite professional athletes seeking full recognition for their talents.

TOMBOY presents an unadulterated account heard through the voices of many of the world’s most prominent female athletes, broadcasters and sports executives:

  • Ann Meyers Drysdale - basketball Hall of Famer/NBC Olympics commentator
  • Hilary Knight - hockey four-time World Champion/two-time Olympic silver medalist Tobin Heath - soccer World Cup champion/two-time Olympic gold medalist
  • Nadine Angerer - soccer World Cup champion/2013 FIFA World Player of the Year
  • Angela Hucles - soccer two-time Olympic gold medalist
  • Monica Abbott - softball “Million Dollar Arm” pitcher/Olympic silver medalist
  • Miesha Tate - UFC bantamweight champion
  • Kim Ng - MLB Senior VP of Operations

TOMBOY is a multiplatform documentary project encompassing a one-hour television special premiering on March 10, 2017 at 7:30pm. Weekly content released through CSN’s websites and social media platforms accompany a series of related podcasts and forums designed to foster public engagement and dialogue.

Quotes from TOMBOY:

“We want to have the best of both worlds. I want to be able to play with Barbies, I want to be able to play dress up, and I also want to be able to go outside and pitch a 77 mile-per-hour softball.”
- Monica Abbott, National Pro Fastpitch “Million Dollar Arm”

“When I was five years old, my grandma asked me what do you want to be when you grow up? And I told her I want to be a hockey player. She said, oh, girls don’t play hockey.”
- Hilary Knight, USA Hockey four-time World Champion

“I just seem to identify more with the male characteristics… of not limiting yourself, and doing whatever it is that makes you happy, following your heart and not segregating yourself based on your sex.”
- UFC Bantamweight Champion Miesha Tate

“There’s nothing weak about being strong. Whether it’s strong arms, or strong body or strong mind – and that strong can be really sexy too. But we need to continue to change that message, because that’s not the message that I hear.”
- Former USA Soccer player and current NBC commentator Danielle Slaton

“I see hope, and I see opportunity, and it is within arm’s reach. I’m tired, but I will never rest. Women will never rest.”
- National Pro Fastpitch champion Emily Allard

Marcus Smart physically cleared to play

celtics_marcus_smart_111917.jpg
File Photo

Marcus Smart physically cleared to play

The Celtics might have a big piece back for Tuesday night's Game 5 against the Bucks. 

Marcus Smart, out since last month after undergoing thumb surgery, has been physically cleared to play. The Celtics have yet to announce whether Smart will definitely play Tuesday, but it's hard to imagine the ultra-competitive Smart wouldn't. 

Smart's potential return might go a long way towards the Celtics reclaiming their series lead after winning Games 1 and 2 before dropping two straight in Milwaukee. His impact on games against the Bucks during the regular season illustrated how much his defense can help. 

Haggerty: For first time in series, Bruins feeling the heat

Haggerty: For first time in series, Bruins feeling the heat

TORONTO -- For the first time in their first-round series against the Maple Leafs, it looks like the Bruins are a little shaken, somewhat rattled, and more than a little frustrated.

The Bruins' top line was held off the score sheet for the third time in the best-of-seven series in Boston's 3-1 loss in Game 6 at the Air Canada Centre Monday night, which tied the series at 3-3 and set up Game 7 Wednesday at TD Garden. Not coincidentally, the Bruins are 0-3 in the series when getting zero point production from Patrice Bergeron, Brad Marchand and David Pastrnak.

DJ BEAN

But this was markedly different from the first couple of Boston losses in the series, where it seemed like Toronto was basically holding on for dear life. In those games, it felt like goalie Freddie Andersen and the Maple Leafs managed to escape rather than accomplish anything sustained or significant against a Boston attack that felt relentless and inevitable.

This time, a stouter Leafs defense blocked 21 shots and battled every step of the way with speed and admirable tenacity. And, of course, Toronto received another standout effort from Andersen, who seems to be getting into the heads of the Boston players.

Especially Marchand, Bergeron and Pastrnak. They still managed to squeeze off 26 shot attempts and a half-dozen scoring chances, but, by the third period, Marchand and Pastrnak both seemed to be feeling the pressure of not scoring. They began doing things they hadn't previously done in the series, getting overly fancy with a lot of their moves in the offensive zone and turning the puck over rather than pushing with precision and hard work toward the net.

"That's playoff hockey," said Marchand. "Regardless of what happened tonight or any other game, you've got to let it go. You just need to worry about the next one. We'll focus on that and let this one go . . . They just kept coming. They're a good team. They've been resilient all year, so you've got to give them a lot of credit.

"If anybody told us at the beginning of the year that we'd be in a Game 7 in the first round at home, I think we would have taken it. It's tough given the position that we're in, but we're just going to look forward to the next game. That's all that we can control. Whatever happened in the last six games doesn't really matter anymore. We're going to be fighting for our lives, and it's going to be a lot of fun."

It sure didn't seem like Marchand was having much fun in Game 6. He couldn't hang onto a loose puck in the D-zone slot late in the second period, and the sequence ended with Mitch Marner snapping home a backhander that broke a 1-1 tie and put Toronto ahead to stay. Whether it was forcing plays that weren't there, over-passing at points when a simple shot would have been better, or missing the net too often while trying to be too fine picking corners against Andersen, the frustration showed for Marchand and his linemates.

That's not a good look for a top-heavy team like the Bruins, which relies on those top forwards to score for playoff success. After piling up 20 points in the first couple of games in the series, the top line has no points and a minus-16 plus/minus rating in the three losses.

"Maybe there was a little bit of [frustration], but you need to go back to the drawing board and find the character that we've shown all year," said Bergeron. "Now it's all about that one game. You can look back all you want, but now that's where you're at and that's the position that we're in. You have to prevail and be good.

"The bottom line is that we need to bear down and be better. It's as simple as that. It's how it should be . . . We have some amazing young players that are in this locker room, and I know they're going to step up. That's the approach that we're going to have, and that's it. There's not much more to be said other than we need to be better."

The question now facing the Bruins is a deep, difficult one.

Should Bruce Cassidy perhaps break up the top line, making the Bruins attack a little less imbalanced and top-heavy? Should he perhaps move Pastrnak down to the David Krejci line while moving David Backes, Rick Nash or Danton Heinen up with Bergeron and Marchand? Should he insert Ryan Donato into the series for a spark of offense and perhaps try him on his off-wing with Bergeron and Marchand in a move that might spark them with a different kind of energy?

By the end of Monday night's Game 6, the Bruins top players almost looked like the weight of carrying Boston's offense had finally begun to wear on them. That's a dynamic that needs to be fixed quickly. Home ice, a couple of adjustments, and the immediacy of a winner-take-all Game 7 might do the trick.

If not, that weight on the collective shoulders of Bergeron, Marchand and Pastrnak will be the thing that ultimately drags the Bruins down.

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