Patriots

Curt Schilling may have to sell his bloody sock

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Curt Schilling may have to sell his bloody sock

From Comcast SportsNetPROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) -- Former Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling might have to sell or give up the famed blood-stained sock he wore on the team's way to the 2004 World Series championship to cover millions of dollars in loans he guaranteed to his failed video game company.Schilling, whose Providence-based 38 Studios filed for bankruptcy in June, listed the sock as collateral to Bank Rhode Island in a September filing with the Massachusetts secretary of state's office. The sock is on display at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, N.Y.Schilling also listed a baseball hat believed to have been worn by New York Yankees great Lou Gehrig and his collection of World War II memorabilia, including some the filing said is being held at the National World War II Museum.Schilling told WEEI-AM in Boston on Thursday that possibly having to sell the sock is part of "having to pay for your mistakes." He said that "I put myself out there" in personally guaranteeing loans to 38 Studios and is seeking what he called an amicable solution with the bank."I'm obligated to try and make amends and, unfortunately, this is one of the byproducts of that," he told the station.Hall of Fame spokesman Brad Horn declined to say whether Schilling has asked for the sock, on loan since 2005, to be returned.The Boston Globe first reported the filing Thursday. It said Schilling personally guaranteed as much as 9.6 million in loans from Bank Rhode Island and 2.4 million in loans from Citizens Bank related to 38 Studios.Schilling, who also pitched for Baltimore, Houston, Philadelphia and Arizona and who won the World Series three times, is perhaps best remembered for pitching Game 6 of the 2004 American League Championship Series with an injured ankle that bloodied his sock. The sock now listed as collateral was stained during the second game of the World Series, which the Red Sox won that year for the first time in 86 years.Richie Russek, owner of the Westhampton, N.Y.-based Grey Flannel Auctions, who is featured on The Discovery Channel series "All Star Dealers," estimated the bloody sock could sell for 50,000 to 100,000, but stressed there is nothing comparable that has ever been auctioned off. He said the Gehrig cap would likely fetch at least 150,000.38 Studios -- which was lured to Rhode Island from Massachusetts with a 75 million state loan guarantee -- had a spectacular collapse. Its financial problems spilled into public view last spring when it missed a 1.1 million payment to the Economic Development Corp. Within weeks, 38 Studios had laid off its nearly 300 employees in Providence and 100 more at an affiliate in Maryland ahead of a bankruptcy filing in June.The firm owes 150.7 million and has assets of 21.7 million, according to court filings. 38 Studios Baltimore made a separate bankruptcy and owes more than 121.4 million, with assets of more than 335,000.The state of Rhode Island, by far the firm's largest creditor, is now likely on the hook for some 100 million related to the loan guarantee deal, including interest. The company's assets are scheduled to be auctioned off.Schilling has conceded he was "absolutely" part of the reason the company failed. But he repeatedly accused Gov. Lincoln Chafee, who was sharply critical of the loan guarantee, of having an agenda that hurt 38 Studios. He called Chafee a "dunce of epic proportions" and a "buffoon."Chafee, an independent, has said he did everything he could to help the company.Schilling also recently put his 20-room home on 26 acres in Medfield, Mass., on the market for 3.45 million. The house, which has a heated pool with waterfall, a beach volleyball court, batting and pitching cages and a putting green, was also listed for sale in 2008. He told WEEI on Thursday that he and his wife had been looking to downsize for some time.Schilling has said he invested as much as 50 million in 38 Studios and has lost all his baseball earnings.

Have the offseason changes negatively affected the Patriots locker room?

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Have the offseason changes negatively affected the Patriots locker room?

The Patriots improve their record to 4-2 with a win over the Jets, but there are still a lot of concerning factors for New England. Mike Giardi and Dan Koppen talk about something the team isn't used to - close games.

Giardi also dives into whether there is a major problem with the locker room dynamic, and whether all the moves they made in the offseason were blown way out of proportion by the media and fans of the talent added, but didn't factor in the personalities they lost.

Koppen and Giardi also look at how the offensive line play has fallen off, despite the same personnel as last year. Finally, discussing the late scratch of Stephon Gilmore due to a concussion. Anything to read into the timing?

Why did Kyrie want to leave Cavs? He's not saying

Why did Kyrie want to leave Cavs? He's not saying

CLEVELAND – Tonight will be a homecoming of sorts for Kyrie Irving, who spent his first six NBA seasons with the Cleveland Cavaliers.
 
Parting ways is a common occurrence in the NBA so that in itself makes Irving’s return pretty normal.

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Still, this basketball break-up was unlike any we’ve seen in the NBA in recent years.
 
At a time when most players are scurrying as fast as they can to latch on with a title contender, Irving literally went in the opposite direction and asked to be traded from a team that has been to the NBA Finals the past three seasons.
 
And he did so while coming off his best season as an NBA player.
 
So, it only stands to reason that he would be asked about that decision on the eve of his first game back in town.
 
However, Irving’s response to the question did not shed any light on the matter, which is just how he wants it to be.
 
“Well guys, going forward, I want to put that to rest in terms of everyone figuring out or trying to figure out or dive into or continue to dive into a narrative that they have no idea about and that probably will never, ever be divulged because it’s not important,” Irving said. “This was literally a decision that I wanted to make solely based on my happiness and pushing my career forward. I don’t want to pinpoint anything. I will never pinpoint anything because that’s not what real grownups do. They continue to move on with their life and continue to progress. And that’s what I’m gonna continue to do.”
 
Part of that push forward involves helping the Celtics get off to a good start tonight in their season opener at Cleveland.
 
This is a game that’s full of storyline and narratives that only enhance the matchup between arguably the top two teams in the East.
 
But nothing compares to the interest that still exists in Irving’s unexpected decision to ask for a trade back in July, which led to him being traded to Boston for Isaiah Thomas, Jae Crowder, Ante Zizic, and the rights to Brooklyn's 2018 first- round pick and Miami’s 2020 second-round pick.  
 
“I’m just happy to get the season started, regardless of who we play,” said Irving, 25, an All-Star in four of his six seasons with the Cavs. Obviously, it’s made a much bigger deal because it’s the Cleveland Cavaliers. The situation that happened this summer and being part of a great trade. I’m just truly appreciative of having the opportunity to play this game on the biggest stage and be back here in Cleveland to start the season, it feels different but I’m ready to get started.”
 
In addition to the excitement of the game, Cleveland has reportedly prepared a video tribute to Irving that will play at some point in a stoppage of play tonight.
 
“It’s a great honor and truly appreciative of all individuals who put the video together,” Irving said. “Those special relationships don’t go anywhere; just excited to see a lot of old friends and get on with the game.”

Ditto for Celtics coach Brad Stevens who, like Irving, has maintained a level-headed approach to a game that has so many subplots to it.
 
“I know this sounds like a broken record, but play the next possession to the best of our ability,” Stevens said. “What are we gonna do about that? Ultimately, we’re on the road, people are going to cheer against us. It’s the way it works in the NBA. It’ll be a great atmosphere in here tonight. Focus on the task at hand. We play 82 of these; get used to playing through distractions.”
 
Irving echoed similar sentiments while acknowledging how unique tonight’s opener is for all involved.
 
“It’s just one game,” he said. “We all understand that. For me, it comes with a lot of added incentive to go out there and really have fun and play the game I love. I’m really excited to start this season, and get started with the Boston Celtics and continue on with my career.”