Patriots

Dr. M.: Green's a lucky guy

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Dr. M.: Green's a lucky guy

By Dr. Neil Minkoff
Special to CSNNE.comJeff Green is a lucky guy.Yes, he's out for the season because he needs surgery for an aortic aneurysm. But he's lucky because a) it was discovered and b) it can be fixed.About 13,000-15,000 people die from aneurysm every year in the United States. Almost none of them know they have a blood vessel waiting to rupture. At least Green does, early enough to repair it.An aneurysm is a weakness in the artery wall that stretches out from the high pressure of the blood flowing through it. Think of a bubble on a bicycle tire. Most aneurysms have no symptoms so the first sign of a problem is when they start to rupture. This can happen in two ways. The first is a straight rupture, where the artery bursts and the blood flows out into the chest or abdomen. The seecond type is called a dissectiob. In a dissection, the wall of the artery splits between layers and the blood flows into the wall itself, widening that tear.Both are incredibly dangerous and a rupturing or dissecting aneurysm requires emergency surgery. The outcome tends to be dicey, as well.An aneurysm can happen anywhere there is a blood vessel. Aneurysm in the vessels in the brain can cause a form of stroke.The most common aneurysms, like Green's, involve the aorta, which is the biggest artery in the body. The aorta takes blood from the heart through the chest and abdomen before splitting in two to go to the legs. An aneurysm can occur in either the section that goes through the chest (called a thoracic aneurysm) or the abdomen (called an abdominal aortic aneurysm or AAA). If the aneurysm is high enough on the aorta, it can interfere with the blood flowing out of the heart, leading to a leaky valve.The best outcomes for aortic aneurysms are the ones that are found by accident, like this one. This has gotten more common over the years, as more and more people get X-rays, CT scans and MRIs. The great advantage is that the patient can get a full work-up and have planned surgery before the aneurysm is rupturing or dissecting.The surgery depend on the locatiuon of the aneurysm, which I don't think is public knowledge. What will happen, though, is that the weak part of the vessel will be reinforced and stabilized. Even though this can now be done without a full, open surgery, I would opt for the full procedure in Green's case. That would provide the best peace of mind for a player who plans to resume full NBA schedule and the contact involved in banging on the floor.

QUICK SLANTS THE PODCAST: Jerod Mayo breaks down the best way for Patriots to attack Jaguars defense

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QUICK SLANTS THE PODCAST: Jerod Mayo breaks down the best way for Patriots to attack Jaguars defense

Jerod Mayo talks with Tom E. Curran and Phil Perry about the Patriots AFC Championship matchup with the Jacksonville Jaguars.

(2:00) Jerod Mayo gives his X’s and O’s breakdown of the Jaguars defensive schemes and traits.

(5:00) Jerod gives his opinion on how the Patriots offense should attack the Jaguars defense.

(8:30) Could Gronkowski be the key to the Patriots offense? What would be the best way to use him?

(15:00) Does the Jaguars defense have a weakness against vertical routes?

(17:00) Jerod Mayo explains why James White could be a key once again for the Patriots. 

(21:00) Will Jaguars change their defensive scheme after allowing 42 to the Steeler?

(23:00) Will much will the Jaguars having the ‘nothing to lose’ mindset impact the game?

Sounds like some Bruins players suffering from Claude fatigue

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Sounds like some Bruins players suffering from Claude fatigue

BRIGHTON, Mass – The resume for Claude Julien speaks for itself in terms of greatness in Boston, so he certainly will get a warm ovation from the TD Garden crowd in his first visit back to Boston since getting fired last February. Julien coached the Boston Bruins for 10 years, won a franchise record 419 games over that time span, made it to the Cup Finals twice and of course hoisted the Cup in 2011.

It won’t matter that he’s now the head coach of the Montreal Canadiens when Julien gets his video tribute, and basks a long ovation similar to the one he received when he was recognized for passing Art Ross on the B’s all-time wins list a couple of season ago. The warmth will be a little weird in the middle of a Bruins/Canadiens rivalry game, but it’s clear that Bruins fans appreciate the job done by Julien for such a long period of time.

The mutual respect was also clear when players like Patrice Bergeron spoke warmly of their coach ahead of last weekend’s showdown in Montreal, which the Bruins eventually pulled out in a shootout at the Bell Centre.

But it would seem the Bruins are starting to get a little tired of tossing verbal bouquets at the guy that’s now behind the Habs bench. It all started with Tuukka Rask’s postgame reaction on Saturday when asked if there was any extra emotion going up against his old coach for the first time.

“He was not playing a shift on the ice, so it doesn’t really matter. He was coaching, so it was nothing special,” said Rask, matter-of-factly.

So there wasn’t any added emotion for Rask going up against Julien’s new team for the first time?

“Nope,” said Rask.   

That line of questioning continued again after Tuesday’s practice at Warrior Ice Arena with Julien coming back to the Garden for the first time.

“Well, I can tell you what’s going to happen,” said Rask. “We’re going to start the game, at some point there’s going to be a video montage, we’re going to tap our sticks and the crowd is going to clap their hands and give him a warm welcome. Then the game is going to continue.”

Does Rask expect either he or some of his longtime teammates will get emotional if they see Julien showing some emotion during his ovation?

“No,” said Rask.

Is it really that cut-and-dry, the Bruins goaltender was asked?  

“It’s just another game,” said Rask, who improved to 8-15-3 lifetime against the Montreal Canadiens after last weekend’s shootout win. “It’s probably special for him to come back and be on the other side, but for us it’s just another game.”

Similarly, Marchand was much more understated speaking about Julien on Tuesday after speaking enthusiastically last weekend about the many discussions player and coach had about “becoming a better a pro” early in his career. But the Bruins winger wasn’t about to get all warm and fuzzy when asked about any greeting that his former coach is expected to get while the legendary Bruins/Habs rivalry plays out on the ice.

“I’m not really looking forward to it, but I’m sure he is,” said Marchand, when asked about the fan reception from Bruins fans awaiting Julien on Wednesday night. “It doesn’t really have anything to do with me, but I’m sure he’s excited to come back. He’s deserved that video and I’m sure a lot of people will be excited to see him again. I’m sure it will be a memorable game.”

Marchand went on to say he "learned a lot" from Julien during their time together, and clearly still has a high level of respect for his former coach. 

 Maybe it’s the very nature of the Bruins/Habs rivalry, or maybe the Bruins players are suffering from a little Claude Julien question fatigue with the two teams playing three times in a span of eight days. Maybe we're even finally seeing some of the Bruins players that had tired of the longtime coach's methods by the end of his long-running tenure in Boston. 

But it sure sounds like some longtime Bruins players might be over it when it comes to the “Claude Bowl” aspect of the ongoing rivalry week between the two storied rivals.  

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