Celtics

Hall of Fame thoughts

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Hall of Fame thoughts

Earlier this week, right around the time Curt Schilling was running his mouth about the inner workings of the Red Sox clubhouse, the Sox announced that Schil will be one of this year's inductees into the Red Sox Hall of Fame. In all, there are five former players and two non-players included in this year's class and they'll be inducted during a ceremony at Fenway Park on Tom Brady's birthday. (August 3)

Here's a quick rundown of who's headed to the Hall, with some commentary from the Standing Room Only staff.

Schilling: He may be brutally annoying in his post-playing days as opposed to only relatively annoying in his playing days but there's no question that Schil deserves a piece of this Hall of Fame pie. And if he's able to keep his acceptance speech a shade under three hours, I'll be happy to see him inducted.

Ellis Burks: For children of the '80s, Burks was the man. One of the first guys who made you feel cool for being a Red Sox fan. When my father used to pitch to me in the backyard growing up, any line drive hit would be referred to as "an Ellis Burks swing"; he was the guy I always wanted to "be." And in the end, Ellis had an unbelievable career. At this point, I don't really care how he did it, but he put up some ridiculous numbers. Over 18 season, he hit .291 with 352 homers, and while most of his damage was done outside of Boston, it was great to see him finish his career here and most importantly, finally get that ring.
Marty Barrett: The MVP of the 1986 ALCS, but more importantly, the Red Sox lead off hitter in RBI Baseball (even if I always used to replace him with a pinch hitter; coincidentally, Ellis Burks). Either accolade makes Barrett a worthy inductee.

Also, did you know that in 1995, Barrett won a 1.7M malpractice suit against Sox team physician Arthur Pappas, where Barrett claimed Pappas misdiagnosed a knee injury and performed medical procedures without his consent?

Better not bring that one up at the ceremony

Joe Dobson: Dobson pitched for the Sox from 1941-1950 (with two years off in the middle for military service) and finished his Boston career with a record of 106-72 and 3.57 ERA. According to Baseball-Reference, Dobson's nickname was Burrhead. That's a Hall of Fame nickname right there.

Dutch Leonard: People used to talk about the Curse of the Bambino, but I always called it the Curse of Dutch Leonard. Leonard won three rings as a pitcher for the Sox from 1912-1918, but in December of 1918 he was traded with Duffy Lewis and Ernie Shore to the New York Yankees for Ray Caldwell, Frank Gilhooley, Slim Love, Roxy Walters and 15,000.

The Sox didn't win another title for 86 years. Hopefully they'll exorcise whatever's left of those demons with this posthumous induction.
Jon I. Taylor: He owned the team from 1904-1911, but most importantly, he's the man who named Fenway Park. And thank God he did. If it weren't for Taylor's suggestion, they were going to call it Kenmore Caverns.

No they weren't.

Joe Mooney: The head groundskeeper from 1971-2000 and the current Director of Grounds Emeritus. A true legend of the groundskeeping game.

No truth to the rumor that he retired in 2000 after growing tired of washing Rich Garces' BBQ sauce stains out of the infield grass.

Rich can be reached at rlevine@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Rich on Twitter at http:twitter.comrich_levine

Celtics won't be broken by Hayward's injury

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Celtics won't be broken by Hayward's injury

BOSTON -- These are tough, heart-tugging times for the Boston Celtics, who are less than 24 hours removed from the gruesome left-ankle injury suffered by Gordon Hayward in the first quarter of their 102-99 loss at Cleveland on Tuesday.
 
Hayward is scheduled to have surgery today, and potentially could be out for the entire season.
 
As much as their hearts go out to Hayward and his family, the Celtics know they can’t spend too much time sulking. The nature of this business won’t allow them, evident by the fact the C's step back on the floor tonight to host the Milwaukee Bucks.
 
“You hurt for him,” said coach Brad Stevens. “He’s put in a lot of great work. I thought he had his most comfortable week as far as feeling like he was going to play really well. It’s a tough, tough deal but I guess that’s part of it, the risk of injury. I really feel for him.”
 
But in the same breath, Stevens is a realist.
 
He's been in the league long enough to know that grieving for a lost player won’t help that player in the short-term. Or the team, for that matter.

MORE ON GORDON HAYWARD

 
The best way the Celtics can help Hayward is to continue to compete in his absence.
 
We saw that in last night’s loss to the Cavaliers.
 
When Hayward was carted off the floor, the Celtics were ahead, 12-9. The lead disappeared and was eventually replaced by an 18-point deficit, only for Boston to chip away and eventually go ahead in the fourth quarter.
 
But down the stretch, too much LeBron James and Kevin Love would prove to be too much for the Celtics to overcome.
 
While the loss was disappointing, it gave the team some insight into how to fight on now that one of its main guys will be out for a significant amount of time.
 
We saw Jaylen Brown emerge from being a second-year pro on the rise into a matchup problem who dropped a career-high 25 points on the Cavs.
 
And Jayson Tatum reminded us all that he’s a teenager in age only, finishing with a double-double of 14 points and 10 rebounds. The last rookie to tally a double-double for the Celtics in his opening night debut was Larry Bird in 1979, who had an identical 14-point, 10-rebound line.


 
But Bird didn’t have to play most of that game with one of the then top-three Celtics out for all but the game’s first five minutes.
 
When it comes to adversity, NBA players don’t have the luxury to pick which ones to handle and which ones to pass on. They either step up to the challenge or be consumed by it.
 
Under Stevens, Door Number One is the only option under consideration.
 
And since Stevens has been in Boston, his players have risen to the challenge.
 
That doesn’t mean they'll win every game, but they've shown the ability to at least be competitive. And in defeat, they'll refuse to use injury as an excuse.
 
That means younger players like Brown and Tatum will assume a larger role at both ends of the floor if Boston is to make it through these tough times relatively unscathed.
 
Veterans like Al Horford and Marcus Smart will be leaned upon more heavily to be leaders, both on and off the floor.
 
And Stevens, considered by many to be one of the better coaches in the NBA, will once again be tasked with making on-the-fly adjustments with his lineup and rotations under less-than-ideal conditions.
 
Nobody hurts more than Stevens when it comes to Hayward’s injury. Remember, he's known him longer than anyone associated with the Celtics, having recruited Hayward to play for Butler. It was the platform that launched both of their NBA careers.
 
Which is why the way he approaches not having Hayward is the example for all his players to follow.
 
Shortly after the loss to the Cavs, Stevens was asked about moving on while handling the emotional dynamics of losing Hayward for an extended period of time.
 
“We’ll be ready to play [tonight],” Stevens said with a heightened level of seriousness in his voice that spoke to how important it was to him and his players that they came out and performed at their best on Tuesday against Cleveland.

And that's the blueprint required for them going forward if they hope to be successful in handling adversity as it comes their way.

NBC SPORTS BOSTON SCHEDULE

BOSTON SPORTS TONIGHT PODCAST: Could Gordon Hayward return this season?

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BOSTON SPORTS TONIGHT PODCAST: Could Gordon Hayward return this season?

0:41 - Kyle Draper, Brain Scalabrine, Tommy Heinsohn, and Mike Gorman break down the Celtics loss to the Cavs and Gordon Hayward’s injury.

4:22 - Tom Curran, Michael Holley, Tom Giles, and Kayce Smith give their reactions to the gruesome injury to Gordon Hayward and how it impacted the game.

9:39 - Dr. Chris Chihlas joins BST to give his medical opinion on Gordon Hayward and if he thinks there is a chance Hayward could return this season. 

13:40 - Chris Mannix and A. Sherrod Blakely discuss what the feeling was like in the arena when Hayward went down but how there is actually a 'cautious optimism' surrounding the injury.