Red Sox

For the love of the game

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For the love of the game

By Adam Hart
CSNNE.com

Wicked Good Sports is often bombarded with Letters to the Editor. So often, in fact, that these letters are rarely read, except when providing an escape during staff meetings.

The following is a letter written by a nearsighted American who lost her glasses and unwittingly owns a television stuck on mute and ESPN. Normally, this letter would be ridiculed and tossed in the trash along with candy wrappers and used paper plates -- yes, even the candy wrappers are ridiculed. But hers is an underrepresented group in today's society, and that's just really sad.

For the love of the game

I am saddened by the passing of Brett Favre.

The hours and hours of highlights broadcast on television have brought comfort, knowing his contributions to American society were many in number and high enough in importance to merit such television coverage. No matter which channel I select, Brett Favre is there.

Countless people have stood up on television to eulogize him, and they all are very nicely dressed. Though doubtful, one can only hope they emphasize the amount of fun he had playing football, and steer clear of the scandals. My grandchildren have informed me sending pictures is his latest faux pas; guess that's why they no longer send me their school photos.

Regardless of how inappropriate it is to mail a photograph to another, scandals have no place in a time of mourning. The human soul requires time to heal, and picking at old wounds is counterproductive.

So let us join forces with the television and broadcast our appreciation for Brett Favre. We may not have the massive amounts of footage -- if it weren't for how many years he played, I'd say he posed for the camera after every play -- but we have our memories. And our credit cards.

"For the love of the game," indeed.

Sincerely,

Anonymous

Post Script: I also express sympathy to the family of that baseball player who died. His highlights shared the broadcast with Favre, an honor his family must hold dear.

If they awarded a Pulitzer Prize for Letters to the Editor, that'd be Top 5 easy.

Padres to interview Red Sox hitting coach Chili Davis for open position

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Padres to interview Red Sox hitting coach Chili Davis for open position

BOSTON -- The coaching migration could begin soon.

Red Sox hitting coach Chili Davis is to be in San Diego on Wednesday, a baseball source told NBC Sports Boston. They have an open hitting coach position that Davis will interview for. Davis' reputation in the game remains excellent, despite some offensive drop-offs for key Sox players in 2017.

Sox president of baseball operations Dave Dombrowski said all the Sox coaches under John Farrell have permission to seek jobs elsewhere.

"I’ve  talked to all the coaching staff members," Dombrowski said last week. "They’re all signed  for 2018. What I told them  is, first  of all, I think very highly of  them. They’re good people. They’re good baseball people. I would recommend  to our new manager any of them, it’s not a problem for me, but I do believe a new manager needs to have his own coaching staff in place within approval of us and making sure that there’s proper areas coached within the club. 

"Would grant permission for any club to talk to our personnel. I know they’re signed, but I wouldn’t want to stand in their way of getting a job somewhere else if that opportunity came up. Some of them could come back, but again, I’m going to wait until we get a manager and I won’t  stand in their way of interviewing elsewhere." 

Davis could eventually land on the interview circuit for manager, as well. 
 

Have the offseason changes negatively affected the Patriots locker room?

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Have the offseason changes negatively affected the Patriots locker room?

The Patriots improve their record to 4-2 with a win over the Jets, but there are still a lot of concerning factors for New England. Mike Giardi and Dan Koppen talk about something the team isn't used to - close games.

Giardi also dives into whether there is a major problem with the locker room dynamic, and whether all the moves they made in the offseason were blown way out of proportion by the media and fans of the talent added, but didn't factor in the personalities they lost.

Koppen and Giardi also look at how the offensive line play has fallen off, despite the same personnel as last year. Finally, discussing the late scratch of Stephon Gilmore due to a concussion. Anything to read into the timing?