Patriots

Nets' Williams (ribs, oblique) out vs. Celtics

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Nets' Williams (ribs, oblique) out vs. Celtics

BOSTON Nets guard Deron Williams (ribs, oblique) won't play tonight against Boston -- a major blow to New Jersey, a team that's struggling enough as it is.

Even worse for Williams is the fact that it will prevent him from matching up against Boston's Rajon Rondo. As much as players talk up the fact that they don't go into any game looking at an individual matchup, that's not the case when elite players such as Williams and Rondo face one another.

"He's one of the best point guards in the game," Williams told CSNNE.com. "He's probably the best defender; on-the-ball defender."

Rondo's offense isn't too shabby, either.

"He's not the best shooter, but is very effective," Williams said. "Knows how to score, he knows how play off the ball when (Ray) or Paul (Pierce) are isolated, he's always cutting back-door, always making himself a threat."

For Williams, he'll see all those qualities first-hand, though unable to do anything about it.

"It's hard having to watch and not play," Williams said. "I'm a competitor; he's a competitor. Of course I want to be out there, especially against one of the best. And Rondo is definitely one of the best."

The Nets are also expected to be without forward Kris Humphries, who is nursing a left shoulder injury.

Browns' GM John Dorsey says dumping Kenny Britt "was an easy decision"

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Browns' GM John Dorsey says dumping Kenny Britt "was an easy decision"

After a nearly ineffective performance against the Miami Dolphins, it appeared that injuries were finally catching up to the Patriots.

A few days after their dreadful Monday Night Football performance, the team moved to sign wide receiver Kenny Britt. The receiver has not had the most productive 2017 but put up 1,000 yards receiving as recently as last year.

Britt is healthy, and Patriots fans will look for him to help out a struggling offense immediately. But can the wide receiver put his troubled past in Cleveland behind him?

John Dorsey, during his first full day as GM, made it a priority to immediately cut Britt. Today on WKNR 850 Cleveland, Dorsey ripped into the former Browns wide receiver.

"I have no problem making that decision,'' Dorsey said today on "The Really Big Show'' with Aaron Goldhammer on WKNR, a radio partner of the Browns. "From a cultural standpoint, I don't think he fits in the prototypical character point of what I'm looking for in terms of a leader. He did not live up to his expectations as a player.''

Dorsey went on to add that Britt "may have a higher opinion of himself than I have of him as a player, so I thought that was easy.''

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Celtics lift spirits, and get theirs lifted, in visit to Boston Children's Hospital

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Celtics lift spirits, and get theirs lifted, in visit to Boston Children's Hospital

BOSTON -- Marcus Morris has been bothered by left knee soreness that continues to limit his availability for the Celtics. 
 
But as much as it hurts Morris to not be able to play with his teammates, he knows all too well just how blessed he is in life. 
 
Morris was among the C's players participating Thursday in the team's annual trip to Boston Children's Hospital, where they put quite a few smiles on the faces of children who -- as Morris and others were quick to acknowledge -- are dealing with real challenges and adversity that trump any bumps, bruises and setbacks on the basketball court they might be experiencing.
 
"For us to get a chance to come over for an afternoon, it's something that  . . . it's one of my favorite places to be," said coach Brad Stevens. "Our team would echo that."

Especially Morris, who, along with his twin brother Markieff Morris, recently spent about $6,000 to pay off the remaining balance on gifts put on layaway at a Walmart in their hometown of Philadelphia. 

"It's the least I can do," Morris told NBC Sports Boston. "My mom, she's got a big heart, just trying to find something different to do. I remember when I was a kid, we used to have so much stuff on layaway and we would get it off like, two days before Christmas. So, I just tried to surprise some people, take care of some layaways."
 
But as we've seen in the past with the Celtics and Boston Children's Hospital, the giving of their time to sit and talk with young patients, share stories and -- in the case of Marcus Smart -- develop life-long bonds with patients, is priceless. 
 
In October, Smart was named the recipient of the New England Baptist Hospital's Community Champions Award in part for the time he has spent at local hospitals that have formed friendships that remain just as strong today. 
 
During his acceptance speech, he brought the packed capacity crowd to near tears detailing his involvement with ill family members and how that has shaped his interactions and friendships with some of the hospitalized youngsters.
 
For Smart, whose older brother Todd died of cancer in 2004, there's a connection that goes beyond the holiday season that he feels when gets a chance to spend time with the kids at Boston Children's Hospital and their family members. 
 
"I have a special connection with these kids here," Smart acknowledged. "Growing up, I went through what some of these kids go through and their families. I understand . . . it's hard to open up to somebody. I know for the kids, it means a lot for us to be here."
 
Although Jayson Tatum is only a rookie, he said today was his second trip visiting the hospital as a Celtic, a reminder that this is part of what being a member of this organization is all about. 
 
"I think it's great that we use our platform, to spend time with these kids to take their minds off of what they're going through" Tatum said. "Even for a couple of hours."

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