Patriots

Jets explain presence of sideline camera

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Jets explain presence of sideline camera

By Phil Perry
CSNNE.com

Now this is a juicy photo, isn't it?

In it, a camera man who looks like a Jets employee is seen standing behind Jets offensive coordinator Brian Schottenheimer, pointing his camera out in the direction of the field.

Or is he shooting across the field, zoomed in on a Patriots coach giving signals on the opposing sideline?

Smell like Spygate? Remember, Bill Belichick was docked 500,000 and the Patriots were fined 250,000 and lost a first round draft pick after the NFL determined that they filmed Jets defensive coaches' signals in 2007.

Since the Jets camera man photo hit the World Wide Web, it's stirred up quite a reaction over whether or not it constitutes evidence for Spygate Part Deux.

On Tuesday, the Jets came out and told everyone to step back and take a deep breath. The camera man was a Jets employee, they explained, and he was authorized (the lime green vest he was wearing marked him as such) to be on the sideline to shoot video for "team programming."

The NFL allows team video crews and TV video crews that produce club-licensed programming (coaches shows, team magazine-style shows, etc.)on the sidelines to shoot footage for those club-licensed programs only.

So as long as the camera man wasn't shooting video for the Jets coaching staff to use as a scouting tool, the Jets are in the clear. But how does anyone know what these camera men are shooting? And how do we know coaches never gets their hands on the tapes to use them deviously?

Seems strange that the NFL would be OK with all of this given the fallout from Spygate.

From PFT:

If coaches are paranoid about the placement by NFL Films of microphones into the pads of offensive linemen, how can coaches be OK with the presence of cameramen who work not for the league or NFL films but for the team that could misuse the images captured by the cameras?This one just seems odd. Maybe every coach is fine with it because every coach has an in-house camera guy potentially doing precisely what the Patriots used to do, with only the addition of a lime green vest. Or maybe the lime green vest makes it easy to track the guy with the camera in order to make sure no funny business is happening.Still, it seems odd to say the least that NFL teams would want to have to worry about this.

Or maybe they aren't worried at all. Maybe, just maybe, every coach in the league trusts every other coach to play by the rules at all times. Sounds plausible . . . right?

Julio Jones presents Johnson Bademosi opportunity to prove he's not niche player

Julio Jones presents Johnson Bademosi opportunity to prove he's not niche player

None of us thought Johnson Bademosi would be starting this past Sunday at MetLife Stadium against the Jets because -- well -- that’s not what we perceive the 27-year-old to be. He’s a special teamer. It’s how he’s made his mark in the NFL dating back to 2012 with Cleveland. So why would that change in mid-October for a team he’s only been with for six weeks? Because Bademosi is -- and has always been -- intent on proving he’s more than a niche player.

“I see myself as a football player,” he said, “and whatever position they put me in, I’m going to try to be the best because that’s how I operate and who I am as a person. Whether that’s as a cornerback, on special teams, if they ask me to play wildcat quarterback. Whatever…”

MORE PATRIOTS:

Bill Belichick and his staff asked for Bademosi to go on the field and not come off. He played 73 defensive snaps in addition to his usual core four special teams duties. 

“I felt like I played a whole game,” Bademosi joked, before saying, “I love playing football so I’m going to go out there and empty myself.”

He did just that, getting targeted only two times in the 24-17 win over the Jets. It was hoped that Bademosi would return to his normal specialist role, but with Stephon Gilmore still out with a concussion, it now seems more and more likely that the sixth year pro will have to be an ironman again Sunday night in primetime against the Falcons. Historically, the Pats have defended bigger receivers. That means Bademosi may be responsible for one of the most dangerous players in the league, Julio Jones.

“He’s an amazing player," he said. “We all know what he’s capable of. As a defense, we have to be prepared for him.”

The Pats were on Super Bowl Sunday and Jones still made a couple of ridiculous plays with either Logan Ryan or Eric Rowe in coverage with safety help over the top.

“He’s fast. He’s physical. He can jump. He can run. He’s smart. He’s everything you want in a wide receiver,” said Bademosi without blinking an eye. That’s the kind of confidence you want from a player at that position and facing this type of challenge. 

“You gotta believe in yourself,” he said “ I’m confident in my abilities. I work hard and trust my preparation.”

Being an elite athlete certainly helps. Bademosi was a scholarship football player at Stanford -- “some guy named Jim Harbaugh called” -- before ending up in the NFL. But it’s Bademosi’s willingness to go all in in the film room that impressed safety Devin McCourty. 

“…I think, honestly, the most work he did was probably with just himself jumping into the film, watching more stuff to exactly see,” said McCourty Thursday. “You know, when you’re a backup more, you’re kind of trying to see everything because you don’t know what role you might be thrust upon once you’re in the game. But, I think once he knew he was starting, it was kind of like, ‘Alright, let me focus in on this.’ I thought he did an awesome job of just being ready and competing.”

Bademosi will have to compete his ass off Sunday night, even against what has been to this point a physically compromised Jones. Based on what he did several days ago, there’s no reason to believe the Pats cornerback won’t bring everything he has, trying to prove again that he’s more than just a special teams whiz.

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