Patriots

Kraft's criticism of lawyered-up NFLPA looks silly now

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Kraft's criticism of lawyered-up NFLPA looks silly now

By Tom E. Curran
CSNNE.com

At the Super Bowl last month, Patriots owner Robert Kraft pooh-poohed legal efforts by the NFLPA to prove the owners backdoored them during the last TV negotiations. Tuesday night, Kraft's pooh-poohing may have turned into an, "Oh, s!"What's happened is easy to explain. The players get 59.5 percent of all revenue; the owners 40.5. When the owners negotiate a deal with an entity -- like selling rights to TV broadcasts of NFL games -- they are negotiating on behalf of themselves and the players. Collective bargaining. They are compelled to get as much as they can, period, because both sides are sharing the money in that 59.5-40.5 split. Yet when the owners cut their most recent deal with the TV networks, they got the networks to agree to pay the owners in the event of a work stoppage. Kinda rotten. Why? Becausethere had to be a monetary concession on the owners' behalf to get that kind of caveat. As in, "Pay us during a work stoppage and we'll cut a few million from the purchase price." And that's taking money out of the players' pockets to keep the owners afloat ifwhen they lock out the players.The money that would keep coming in to the owners would allow them to pay their mortgage and upkeep on their stadiums, pay their non-playing employees, collect their own salaries, fuel up the G-5, etc.But U.S. District Court Judge David Doty handed down a ruling Tuesday that keeps the 4 billion the owners stood to collect in event of a work stoppage out of the owners hands. He'll decide at a later hearing whether the owners are ultimately fined (they were already fined 7 million by a lower court for this move) or the money is just put in escrow where they can't touch it. Without access to that money, the owners are up the creek a little bit financially. Or as up the creek as billionaires can be. What's interesting about this locally is how condescending Robert Kraft was about the players taking this issue to court. In criticizing the NFLPA for legal wrangling instead of business dealing, Krafthammered the players for spending 15 million (Kraft's number) on lawyers to prove the owners backdoored them on the TV deal."Lawyers collected 15 million in fees that the players paid, think about that!" Kraft raged."If it's coming out of our pockets, and I'm managing our lawyers, if they're not adding value, tell them to zip it. I need lawyers to keep, to protect me from myself, but business people do business deals, not lawyers."I asked Kraft point-blank about the fact the players did win a 7 million award in the case at that point because the owners, it was found, did try to backdoor them.In response, Kraft said, "The irony. I worked very hard with the commissioner to extend these contracts when the financial world was falling apart and we realized the main source of our revenue was these media contracts. We went out ina very difficult environment and were able to conclude extensions of these contracts to protect the players income and the owners income. For them to sue over something like that, it just shows you how out of touch . . . there are so many things we can do to create new partnership opportunities and grow and we have to get the lawyers away from the table and get business leaders on both sides." By his facial expressionand tone, it's clear Kraft was outraged the players would question what happened with the TV deals in 2008. But the fact remains that the owners covered their financial backsides and left the players' exposed. Even though monies paid out to theowners during the lockout were loans and had to be paid back, Doty found that 421 million would not have to be paid back. That's more than 10 million per team being fronted during the lockout that wouldn't need to be reimbursed when football returned. Further, according to Doty, "NFL characterized network opposition to lockout provisions to be a deal breaker."The owners weren't leaving the table until they'd taken care of themselves when the cash cow that is NFL football went into a coma, even if the players would go without. The prevailing thought today is that the owners cannot now afford a lockout. The scary thought is, they probably can. And they'll just start cutting costs and throwing workaday employees out of the offices because they're so irritated at Doty's ruling and the players in general. NFL owners aren't accustomed to losing in business. They got killed in the 2006 CBA negotiation. This setback from Doty may make them dig in even harder.

Tom E. Curran can be reached at tcurran@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Tom on Twitter at http:twitter.comtomecurran

Speed to burn: Cooks, Brady team up to form most productive deep-ball combo

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Speed to burn: Cooks, Brady team up to form most productive deep-ball combo

The first came in the second quarter, when Brandin Cooks turned on afterburners to beat a Raiders double team and glide underneath a Tom Brady heave for 52 yards. The second came in the third quarter, on the third play from scrimmage of the second half, when Cooks faked an out-route, jetted past rookie corner Obi Melifonwu, and sped into the end zone to make the score 24-0. 

Both deep completions in New England's 33-8 win over Oakland just added to cumulative effect that Cooks has had on the Patriots offense since arriving before the season to become their top deep threat. 

Paired with Brady, Cooks has actually become the most productive deep threat in the NFL. 

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According to Pro Football Focus, Cooks leads all receivers with 431 yards on deep passes (throws that travel 20 yards or more down the field). In second place is Houston's DeAndre Hopkins with 313 yards. 

And Brady, who has long been more effective in the short-to-intermediate range than he has been deep, is now among the league leaders in creating explosive plays from the quarterback position. The Patriots are third in the NFL with 41 pass plays of 20 yards or more, and they are tied for second with nine plays of 40 yards or more. 

"You're always trying to work on that," Brady told WEEI's Kirk and Callahan Show of his team's deep passing game. "It's not one particular year [you work on it]. I think that's been a concerted effort by our entire offense, trying to make more explosive plays in the pass game. 

"Sometimes your offense is built differently. We actually have some guys now that can really get down the field so that becomes more of a point of emphasis. The way Brandin runs, the way that Chris Hogan runs, the way that Phillip Dorsett runs, they're very fast. You need to be able to take advantage of their skill set . . . 

"When we had David Patten we were throwing it deep. I mean, but David Patten didn't run a lot of short routes. I would say Brandin Cooks, in general, he doesn't run a lot of short routes. Everyone has a different role. If we can get by you, I think that's a good place to throw the ball. if we can't, we gotta figure out ways to throw it underneath and different weeks are going to call for different things based on the strengths of the defenses we're playing, too."

A week before beating the Raiders, against the Broncos and their talented corners, the Patriots had less luck pushing the ball down the field -- though they tried to hit Cooks deep multiple times. In Mexico City, Cooks matched up with a weaker secondary, and he wasn't at all slowed by the altitude, catching six passes in all for 149 yards and a score. 

Per PFF, Cooks has seen almost one third of his targets (30 percent) come on deep passes, which is the ninth-highest rate in the league. He's caught all 11 of his catchable deep passes, three of them accounting for scores.

"Obviously when you're throwing the ball 50-60 yards down the field," Brady said, "your chances of completion go down, but if you hit it, it ends up being a very explosive plays and you can change a lot of field position and get a defense really on their heels if they have to defend every blade of grass on the field." 

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Belichick remembers Glenn: 'A good person with good intentions'

Belichick remembers Glenn: 'A good person with good intentions'

Terry Glenn, the Patriots' top draft pick in 1996, died early Monday morning in a one-car accident in Irving, Texas. He was 43. 

Bill Belichick coached Glenn as an assistant with the Patriots during Glenn's rookie season. He was later Glenn's head coach in 2000 and 2001. Belichick traded Glenn to the Packers before the 2002 season after a tumultuous run in New England that involved legal trouble, injuries and clashes with the coaching staff.

During a conference call with reporters soon after the news of Glenn's death was published, Belichick remembered Glenn for his natural physical ability and "a good heart."

"I was pretty close with Terry," Belichick said, "and his rookie season was my first year here in '96, and so I had a lot of interaction with him and other people that were involved in his life and his upbringing separate from the Patriots. Terry's a very smart individual. Had a lot of, obviously, a lot of physical skill and talent. Could do a lot of things on the football field very naturally. And I think he was deep down inside a good person with good intentions and, you know, a good heart. Obviously it's very unfortunate. Very unfortunate passing. I mean, it's a sad day. Sad news."

According to reports, Glenn was with his fiancee at the time of the accident. She's being treated at a local hospital for unspecified injuries.