Patriots

Making sense of the Jimmy Garoppolo stunner

Making sense of the Jimmy Garoppolo stunner

Pried your jaw off the floor? Returned your eyeballs to their sockets? Let's get to the questions that are flying around now that the Patriots have sent Jimmy Garoppolo to the San Francisco 49ers.

Why now?

The presumption has been that the Patriots would franchise Garoppolo at the end of the season, then deal him. Even though the $24 million franchise cost for a quarterback was prohibitive, the Patriots would employ some imaginative accounting and find a way to fit Garoppolo under the cap until they could move him. But the way it was shaping up, the franchise/trade option would have tied the Patriots hands in free agency. Multiple restructures and/or releases were going to be necessary and it would have put the Patriots behind in free-agent pursuit because Garoppolo would still be on the books.

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What about the bounty they could have had?

A second-round pick? That's all? A player who some forecasted could be worth two first-round picks or more only pulls a second-round pick in exchange for his services? That feels like a major sacrifice by the Patriots. And what did they get in exchange? If there truly were multiple first-round picks on the table for Garoppolo in April and now, six months later, all they got from him was a few preseason appearances and eight games of back up duty, that's not what anyone would be able to call value. Jacoby Brissett could have just as easily done what Garoppolo has been doing since the beginning of September. I could've done what Garoppolo's been doing. This to me is what is most confusing. The franchise that has so often hoarded draft picks and spoken about value just left a gorgeous asset on their front lawn with a "Make an Offer" sign on the windshield. 

What does it mean for Brady?

With Jimmy G. there will be no showdown at noon for the starting quarterback position. All the time we spent, all the air we blew, every keystroke on every article and email that presaged Tom Brady's famous final scene is now for naught. Brady wins. He is signed through 2019 at which point he'll be 42 years old. The Patriots almost certainly won't move on from him before then (I've been wrong before) and he will then have the luxury of deciding if he wants to continue past his 20th NFL season. At that point, Rob Gronkowski's and Julian Edelman's contracts will also be up. It has always seemed a likely time for a dismount.

What did we learn? 

For more than a year the Patriots have been considering the economic wisdom of franchising Garoppolo and keeping Brady. That was definitely on the table. But while there were conversations with Cleveland that were reported around the draft, it's reasonable now to doubt that what they were offering was as generous as people believed. Or if it was as concrete. This was the last chance the Patriots had to trade Garoppolo before they had to either franchise him or lose him. After 4 PM Tuesday, he was walking for nothing or costing them $24 million. We all know how shrewd Bill Belichick is. Did he just get exponentially dumber over the last six months? Doubtful. There will be a lot of reasonable puzzling as to whether the Patriots got enough for Jimmy. In trade compensation, probably not. All they got was what they gave up. The second round pick. But when you think of what he represented: The ghost of Brady's football future - Younger, faster, more handsome. His presence kicked Brady into overdrive. And an unimaginable three-season stretch which included two Super Bowl wins ensued. In some ways, Jimmy G. was one of the most important Patriots of the Bellichick era.

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Amendola the definition of a good football player for Belichick, Patriots

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Amendola the definition of a good football player for Belichick, Patriots

FOXBORO -- When it was over and an army of reporters and photographers in vests flooded the Gillette Stadium turf, Tom Brady was engulfed. Danny Amendola, meanwhile, was on the periphery, about 30 yards away from the 6-foot-4 eye of the storm, talking to one man with one microphone. 

Amendola slowly worked his way toward the middle of the field, and after a few minutes he eventually met up with Brady at the bottom of the steps of a makeshift stage. Before they both stepped up to address the more than 70,000 people in attendance, they laughed. It was their longest-developing connection of the night. 

"It means a lot, man," he told CBS' Jim Nantz moments later. "We put a lot of hard work into each week of the season and coming out here and getting a win each week. And we love playing at home, we love being in Foxboro, and we love you."

In that instant, Patriots fans of all types were probably returning the sentiment en masse. Amendola had just reeled in seven grabs for 84 yards and two scores, both of which came in the fourth quarter. The second put the Patriots ahead for the first time all night and gave them a 24-20 victory over the Jaguars to advance to Super Bowl LII. 

"I’m going to enjoy it tonight, I know that," Amendola said. "We know what to expect. A lot of guys in this room have been in a situation like that before. We know what’s it’s going to take to get the work done the week of. We know what the expectations are, we know what the media are going to be like and we’re going to be ready."

With Rob Gronkowski out due to a head injury suffered in the second quarter, and with Julian Edelman long gone for the season, Amendola came into focus as Brady's top target, especially in critical situations. 

There was the fourth-down conversion in the first quarter that led to a field goal. There was the third-and-18 completion with 10:49 left that kept New England's first fourth-quarter scoring drive alive. And there were the two touchdowns, a nine-yarder with just under nine minutes remaining and a toe-tapping four-yarder along the back end zone to take the lead with 2:48 to go. 

"Yeah, it was great," Brady said of Amendola's game-winner. "He’s made so many big catches, and I saw he got the one foot in and I just saw it up on the big screen one time. He’s got great hands and just a great sense about where he’s at on the field. So, I mean, he’s made so many big plays for us, and this was huge, and without that, we don’t win. It was an incredible play."

The Patriots work on those specific types of plays going all the way back to the spring, according to players. And in training camp, during practice sessions that are open to the public, some of the most engaging periods involve watching Patriots receivers catch touchdowns along the back end line from Brady. 

"These are situations that we practice," said receiver and special teams ace Matthew Slater. "Red-area scramble. Red-area situations. Back of the end zone, ball high. Front of the end zone, ball low. We work this. We practice this. To be able to come out and execute it at the most critical times of the season, it started in OTAs and now presents itself when we need it the most. I think preparation and execution really came together at the right time for us today."

Amendola had just three touches -- including a three-yard run -- in the first half. Jacksonville's defense was swarming, and the shallow middle portion of the field seemed to be a no-go for the Patriots offense. His first touch of the second half was a throw that he completed to Dion Lewis on a double-pass. Then, when he caught the third-and-18 sinking fastball from Brady, the seal was broken. Amendola was targeted six more times the rest of the way and caught four. 

One was a wild throw from Brady, high and a touch wide, to Amendola to pick up 14 yards and a first down. It was one of multiple athletic grabs from the 32-year-old in the game. 

"“The guy’s got maybe the best hand-eye coordination of any player I’ve ever played with," Slater said. "And I played with Randy Moss. His hand-eye coordination is elite. How do you measure that? You can't. It's just an in-game thing. I don't know. He's just so reliable, so consistent. And I think it just says so much about his character."

Bill Belichick raved about Amendola's game, which he did just over a week ago after Amendola had 11 catches for 112 yards against the Titans in the Divisional Round. Not only did Amendola catch it well, Belichick explained, but he had a key punt return as well. 

With 4:58 remaining in the game and the Patriots down 20-17, Amendola brought a punt back 20 yards to put the Patriots in field goal range. Three plays later, Amendola was in the end zone and they didn't need a kick. 

"Danny's a tremendous competitor, made some big plays for us," Belichick said. "I thought, as usual, he handled the punts great, and he had the last punt return that really set us up for the final touchdown. 

"Danny's such a good football player. When you look up ‘good football player’ in the dictionary his picture is right there beside it. It doesn’t matter what it is. Fielding punts, third down, big play, red area, onside kick recovery -- whatever we need him to do. He’s just a tremendous player, very instinctive, tough, great concentration. He had some big plays for us today."

He seems to have a knack for that this time of year.

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Sooner or later, the Patriots will cut you down

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Sooner or later, the Patriots will cut you down

FOXBORO – Somewhere in Jacksonville, there had to be a whiteboard drawn up with the following “MUST DOS!!” on it.

Control Rob Gronkowski.

Control Dion Lewis.

Win turnover battle.

Convert third downs.

Stop Tom Brady on third down.

Win time of possession.

Run football.

Stop the run.

Convert in red zone.

Get brilliance from Blake Bortles.

When the Jaguars return to Jacksonville, they will look at this hypothetical whiteboard.  They’ll see that they checked every … single … box. Even the last one. Then they will clean out their lockers and go home for the season.

The Jaguars – who had an upset for the ages in their hands until they realized it was too hot to hold – will have to grapple with how they let it get away.

They will never accept that they weren’t a better team on this day. They don’t have to. But they will have to accept that they got beat. This was one of those stealth assassinations by the Patriots – a blowdart in the back of the neck from behind a bush 200 feet away.

The Jaguars will watch another Super Bowl. Like the Lions, Browns, and Texans, they still don’t know what it’s like. The Patriots are headed to their eighth Super Bowl of the Brady-Belichick Era. That means 15 percent of all Super Bowls will have included those two. Twenty-one percent of all Super Bowls will have featured Belichick on the sidelines (nine with New England and two with the Giants).

Even Tom Coughlin couldn’t save the Jaguars from the inevitable Brady’ing they got in the fourth quarter  Sunday evening.

Watching Brady bring the Patriots back from a 20-10 deficit without Gronk over the last 15 minutes was like watching the MacGyver disarm a bomb before the orphanage blew up.

Even after the wires sparked (Lewis getting stripped by Myles Jack with 13:53 left). Even after he dropped his wrench (a sack and an incompletion bringing up third-and-18 with 10:49 left). Even after the lights went out (forced to punt with six minutes left, still trailing by three). You knew, I knew, the Jaguars knew and America knew how it would end.

With kneeldowns and confetti and the Patriots heading to Super Bowl 52. With another local opportunity to produce odes and t-shirts commemorating the grit, preparation and resourcefulness that New England loves and makes the rest of the country want to punch itself in the face.

The Jaguars, with their Pro Bowl corners Jalen Ramsey and A.J. Bouye, their Defensive Player of the Year candidate Calais Campbell, their $90M defensive lineman Malik Jackson, a defensive end taken third-overall in 2015 (Dante Fowler) and two rocket-fueled linebackers (Myles Jack and Telvin Smith), got outfoxed by Danny Amendola.

Undrafted, 32-year-old Danny Amendola, noted for annual pay cuts, a lengthy injury history, a modeling contract and a narrow-frame that hasn’t been acceptable by NFL standards since the 1970s.

A player that was dismissed before he began in New England, mocked after once he did begin and lamented even after that.

Danny Amendola was the Robin to Brady’s Batman this time, catching five passes for 56 yards and two touchdowns and returning a punt 20 yards over an eight-minute span that brought the Patriots from down 20-10 to ahead 24-20.

It was Amendola and Brandin Cooks – a player maligned this year in a way similar to what Amendola once got – carrying the Patriots after their Hall of Fame-bound tight end that got knocked out with a concussion in the second quarter.

This will be the kind of game Jaguars fans will have to watch a dozen times before they finally see the tiny things that caused them to lose. Because the numbers sure don’t show it. Gronk caught one pass for 21 yards. The Jags were 6 for 15 on third down and the Patriots were 3 for 12. The Patriots had the game’s only turnover.

The Jaguars scored touchdowns on both red zone trips. The Patriots ran for 46 yards while the Jags ran for 101 (and 18 of those Patriots yards came on one run in clock-killing mode). The Jags had the ball 10 minutes longer than the Patriots and Bortles went 23 for 36 for 293.

But the Jags mismanaged the clock before the half. In a three-play span just before halftime, they took three penalties. One of them was a delay of game after a Patriots time out. Moronic. The clock stoppages and penalties gave the ball back to New England and the Patriots – predictably – got a touchdown before the break instead of the Jags being able to double up possessions going into the half and coming out.

Meanwhile, a Jags coaching staff that probably figured it would be playing from behind and trying to keep the ball away from New England, didn’t adjust to the flow of the game and take what the Patriots were giving – miles of open space in the secondary.

The Jags kept running into the middle of the Patriots defense on first down – Leonard Fournette looked like the drunk guy at the barbeque who keeps walking into the slider.

In the second half, this is what Jacksonville did on first down while it had the lead: Fournette for 2, Fournette for 1, Fournette for 3, incomplete, Fournette for 0, FLEA FLICKER for 15-yard completion! Fournette for 2, Fournette for 14, incomplete, Fournette for 2, Fournette for 1, Fournette for 1, Fournette for -1.

Think about that for a second. The Jaguars had the Patriots on the run. Gronk was down. Julian Edelman never played. Donta Hightower never played. They’d taken the running backs away on the ground and in the air. The 40-year-old quarterback was playing with a gash in his hand. Both Patriots coordinators have a foot out the door on their way to new coaching gigs. Bortles was playing like Aaron Rodgers. And they ran 10 dive plays, a flea flicker and threw two incompletions on the first 13 first down plays they ran in the second half.


That’s just asking for the result they got. If you steal a lead against the Patriots, you don’t hide in the closet and hope they don’t come looking for you there.

They always look in the closet.


And they always get you. In the end, they always get you.


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