Celtics

Roger Goodell: The 1 man

410975.jpg

Roger Goodell: The 1 man

Jon Fucile
WickedGoodSports.com

Surprise, surprise! A bunch of greedy millionaires and billionaires couldn't come to an agreement about the amount of money they want and now the NFL has entered a lockout. Fantastic.
Wah wah wah I'm only getting ten million and I want twenty! This is so unfair!

Someone call the Waaaaaaaaah-bulance.

If you recall, NFL commishioner Roger Goodell made a promise that if there was a lockout, he'd reduce his 10 million salary to just one dollar. I guess he underestimated the pettiness that money instills in people because now he's forced to make good on his promise.

Mr. Good Guy Roger Goodell will reportedly keep his word and reduce his salary to a buck in an effort to make himself appear super awesome and be like the common man.

He's one of us now! A common man!

In order to adjust to his new life and see what it is like to be poor, he reportedly started watching Nascar.

His previous lifestyle was expensive though, and that one dollar salary just might not cut it. He may have to collect cans.

Or hit the streets hard and pan handle. You know, get a good honest day's work.

Maybe he'll even do what a bench of med students do and dance their way through the rough times to pay their bills!

Gross.

You know what though? We're not fooled.

Is Roger really this good of a guy? Probably not. We don't know him personally but really, the guy isn't hurting for money. He's likely just trying to deflect some heat from himself by bringing himself down to the level of us "commoners."

You're not fooling anybody pal. You're probably sitting at home throwing money into the air and watching it rain.

All this lockout does is highlight how incredibly greedy everyone involved is. This probably all could've been prevented. But apparently a few extra bucks are more important than entertaining fans or making sure the players who actually sacrifice their bodies get an extra piece of the pie.

Remember when sports was simply about the entertainment? Yeah, neither do we.

Khudobin can't save Bruins' goaltending situation

cp-spark-bruins-rask-khudobin-102317x.jpg

Khudobin can't save Bruins' goaltending situation

The entire concept of Tuukka Rask getting pushed by one of his backups is based on the backup consistently performing at a high standard, and that wasn’t the case for Anton Khudobin over the weekend.

Just as it isn’t solely the fault of Rask when the Bruins lose, it wasn’t solely the fault of Khudobin that Boston squandered leads of 3-0 and 4-1 in an overtime loss to Buffalo on Saturday night. But Khudobin couldn’t step up and carry the B's when they clearly started losing their edge in the second half of the game, and that inconsistency will certainly make the Bruins pine for a sooner-rather-than-later return of a concussed Rask.

“Erratic,” said coach Bruce Cassidy when asked to describe Khudobin postgame. “He battles. We love that about him. He battled to the end. He certainly made his share of saves. We need to be better in front of him. But there were times that, there were fires that needed to be put out that shouldn’t have been necessary. But that happens sometimes.”

It was certainly too much to expect Khudobin to be perfect, but they just needed him to be good enough to pull them through while they were getting waylaid in the second half of the game. That proved to be a major challenge, given the players the Bruins are missing and the extremely rough night suffered by Torey Krug (minus-3 on Saturday night, and minus-8 for the season). Khudobin finished with 37 stops as a defense corps without Adam McQuaid and Kevan Miller wilted in the third period and the overtime, but he couldn’t make the clean saves for whistles when the team really needed them. Case in point was a Rasmus Ristolainen tester in overtime while the Bruins were in the midst of being outshot by a 6-0 margin in the extra session. Khudobin got a glove on it but couldn’t cleanly catch it for a badly needed stoppage in play at a time when Krug, David Pastrnak and Brad Marchand had been caught on the ice for over two minutes.

"The start was great, and the game was great until we scored the fourth goal, and I think after that, we thought it was an easy game,” said Khudobin. “[The high volume of shots] wasn’t that much difficult, I like shots, like probably every other goalie, but they were crashing the net. They were going hard. There were a lot of deflections, a lot of rebounds, a lot of scrums in front of the net, which were . . .that’s the dangerous part, not just the shots.”

Khudobin, 31, has taken five of a possible six points in the games he's played this season and is off to a solid start with a 2-0-1 record, a 2.98 goals-against average and a .910 save percentage. He looks like he’s going to be a perfectly fine backup, enabling the Bruins to hold Rask to the 55-60 games they’ve forecasted for his peak performance this season.

But Saturday night was a major blow to any hopes that Rask would be pushed competitively by his backup, and that a Khudobin hot streak could spark a slow-starting, and now injured, Rask when he does return.

Instead the Bruins are left to hope they can survive while missing Rask along with a number of other key players, and that the goalie returns sooner than later to a team that can’t survive too many morale-crushing defeats like the choke job against the lowly Sabres.

NBC SPORTS BOSTON SCHEDULE