Kansas City Chiefs

Chiefs reach agreement to trade Alex Smith to Washington

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Chiefs reach agreement to trade Alex Smith to Washington

WASHINGTON -- Kansas City has agreed to trade quarterback Alex Smith to Washington, a move that spells the end of Kirk Cousins' time with the Redskins and hands the Chiefs' job to Patrick Mahomes.

Two people with direct knowledge of the deal confirmed the move to The Associated Press on Tuesday night on condition of anonymity because the transaction can't be completed until the start of the new league year in March. One person told the AP the Redskins had agreed to a four-year extension with Smith, who had one year left on his contract.

Smith, who turns 34 in May, spent the past five seasons with the Chiefs, leading them to the playoffs four times while throwing for 102 touchdowns and 33 interceptions. He carries a $17 million salary-cap hit for 2018.

Kansas City saves cap space and can turn to Mahomes, the 10th pick in last year's draft out of Texas Tech, as its new starter.

Smith becomes Washington's new franchise quarterback after throwing for 31,888 yards and 183 touchdowns in 12 NFL seasons with the San Francisco 49ers and Chiefs.

Smith is "one of the best competitors and teammates I've ever been around," Chiefs tight end Travis Kelce posted on Twitter. "Someone who I owe a lot of my success to, and a guy that's been a class act through all the ups n downs."

The Redskins acquired Smith and signed him to the kind of long-term deal they balked at with Cousins, who became the first QB to play back-to-back seasons on the franchise tag. Cousins can become a free agent next month at age 29.

"Nothing really surprises me anymore," Redskins tight end Niles Paul tweeted . Former Redskins QB Robert Griffin III tweeted : "Some how...Some way...they will blame this on me. No doubt."

Cousins, drafted by the Redskins in the fourth round out of Michigan State in 2012 - the same year they traded up to Griffin with the No 2 pick - likely leaves Washington with the fourth-most passing yards in franchise history, more than 16,000.

Under coach Jay Gruden, Cousins became the first Redskins QB to start all 16 games for three consecutive seasons. He threw for at least 4,000 yards in each, while totaling 81 touchdowns and 36 interceptions. But Washington only played in one playoff game during that span, going 9-7, 8-7-1 and, most recently, 7-9 in Cousins' time as a starter.

Cousins has been the biggest question hovering over Washington's offseason - and, indeed, hovering over the whole organization for a couple of years as the team failed to sign him to a long-term deal.

According to ESPN, Washington is sending a third-round draft pick and cornerback Kendall Fuller to Kansas City in the trade, which cannot be finalized until March 14. The Kansas City Star first reported the deal.

This is the second time a team coached by Andy Reid has traded a 33-year-old QB to the Redskins. Reid's Philadelphia Eagles dealt Donovan McNabb to Washington in 2010 for second- and third-round picks.

Titans rally to stun Chiefs in Wild Card game, 22-21

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Titans rally to stun Chiefs in Wild Card game, 22-21

KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Marcus Mariota did everything he could to help the Titans advance in the playoffs, throwing a crazy touchdown pass to himself , running for crucial first downs and providing the kind of spark that Tennessee needed to rally from a 21-3 halftime hole.

Heck, he even threw a crucial block on the run that clinched the game.

It all added up to a heart-stopping 22-21 victory over the Kansas City Chiefs on Saturday, the first postseason win for the Titans in 14 years and one that will provide some relief - for the week, at least - for embattled coach Mike Mularkey and his remarkable bunch of underdogs.

"Special," said Mariota, whose 205 yards passing included the go-ahead 22-yard strike to Eric Decker with six minutes left. "I'm part of a great team. I'm part of a group of guys that really believe in each other. And it's something special."

Now, the Titans will find out Sunday whether they're headed to New England or Pittsburgh next.

Derrick Henry added a career-high 156 yards rushing and another score for Tennessee (10-7), while a defense fileted by Alex Smith and the Chiefs (10-7) in the first half pitched a shutout in the second half - dooming the Kansas City franchise to another humiliating postseason defeat.

The Chiefs haven't won a home playoff game since January 1994.

"I'm in shock," Smith said. "The swing at halftime to the final whistle, definitely a shock. Yeah. Didn't feel like we played up to how we're capable of playing and that's disappointing.

Smith threw for 264 yards and two touchdowns , but most of that came before halftime. He couldn't get going in the second half and misfired on fourth-and-9 at the Titans 44 with just over two minutes to go, denying the Chiefs a chance for Harrison Butker to kick a go-ahead field goal.

Adding to the depression? Henry appeared to fumble as Tennessee tried to run out the clock.

The Chiefs' Derrick Johnson picked up the ball and returned it for a touchdown with 1:47 to go, and the crowd went wild as fireworks shot off over Arrowhead Stadium. But a replay clearly showed Henry down, the call was overturned and Tennessee succeeded in running out the clock. Mariota threw a block that helped spring Henry for a 22-yard gain on third-and 10 late that helped finish off the comeback.

"Grit. It's just grit," Henry said. "We told them we've got 30 minutes left, all we've got to do is play our game. Execute the plays and everything will take care of itself."

In the first half, the Chiefs looked every bit the team that had won four straight in convincing fashion, and the Titans looked every bit the team that backed into the playoffs.

Kareem Hunt, the league's top rusher this season , plunged in from 1 yard for a 7-0 lead. Smith hit Travis Kelce, who later left with a concussion, with a 13-yard touchdown pass. And he added another TD toss to Demarcus Robinson on the final offensive play for a 21-3 lead at the break.

"We were feeling good," Johnson said. "We came in 21-3 and that's all we were talking about: `Finish. Don't get complacent. We have bigger goals than this game.'"

But it was the Titans who finished, and it was Mariota who led the way. He capped a 91-yard TD drive to start the second half in the bizarre fashions: Mariota threw a TD pass to himself.

His throw to the end zone was batted right back at him by Darrelle Revis, and Mariota hauled it in and dived for the goal line. It was the first time a player has thrown a TD pass to himself in the playoffs, and the first time in any game since the Vikings' Brad Johnson during the 1997 season.

"Right place, right time," Mariota said with a smile.

Tennessee nearly squandered its momentum when Adoree Jackson fumbled a punt, but the Chiefs were unable to pick up a first down and Butker knocked a 48-yard field goal off the upright. And the Titans capitalized when Henry rumbled nearly untouched 35 yards for a touchdown a few minutes later.

The Chiefs' offense had been rendered impotent by that point, unable to move the ball after Kelce left with a concussion in the first half. And the Titans blanketed Tyreek Hill whenever he touched the ball, and they stacked the box to slow Hunt down in obvious rushing situations.

Finally, the Titans pulled ahead on Mariota's strike to Decker, and that led to more controversy from the officials. Tennessee went for a 2-point conversion and a field-goal edge, Mariota fumbled as he was getting sacked and Frank Zombo scooped up the ball for two points the other way.

But the officials had blown the play dead, ruling Mariota's progress had been stopped, and the Titans retained the slimmest of margins - one that would stand up to the final whistle.

"I feel really good around our football team," Mularkey said. "I know what I'm going to get from them every week. That's a good feeling, knowing how they're going to come out, no matter what."

OFFICIAL COMPLAINTS

The Chiefs also complained about the officials blowing their whistles on a play late in the first half, when Mariota fumbled while getting sacked. He clearly lost the ball and the Chiefs picked it up, but the play could not be reviewed. Tennessee wound up kicking a field goal.

RECORD RALLY

Only two other road teams have rallied from at least 18 down to win a playoff game in NFL history. The Cowboys came back from 21-3 in the first half to beat the 49ers 30-28 in December 1972, and the Lions came back from 27-7 in the second half to beat the 49ers in December 1957.

KELCE HURT

Kelce sustained his concussion on a wicked blow from Titans S Johnathan Cyprien late in the first half. Kelce, who had four catches for 66 yards, lay stunned on the turf for a moment before wobbling to his feet. Trainers quickly took him to the locker room and he did not return.

UP NEXT

The Titans' opponent in the divisional round will be decided Sunday. If the Jaguars beat the Bills in their wild-card matchup, Tennessee heads to New England to face the No. 1 seed. If Buffalo wins, the Titans head to face No. 2 seed Pittsburgh.

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Chiefs clinch second consecutive AFC West title with win over Dolphins

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Chiefs clinch second consecutive AFC West title with win over Dolphins

KANSAS CITY, Mo. - Andy Reid addressed the Kansas City Chiefs in a jubilant locker room dressed from head-to-toe in a Santa Claus suit, which not only fit him perfectly but was also perfectly fitting.

The Chiefs had just given their fans quite a present.

Alex Smith threw for 304 yards and a touchdown in another steady performance, Kareem Hunt ran for 91 yards and a score, and the Chiefs beat the Miami Dolphins 29-13 on Sunday to clinch back-to-back AFC West titles for the first time in franchise history.

"Just phenomenal," Reid said, likely smiling beneath his fluffy white beard. "But we're not going to sit on this. We're not done yet. We're going to enjoy the holiday and get right back at it."

Tyreek Hill had six catches for 109 yards, and Harrison Butker converted five field goals, as the Chiefs (9-6) dashed what faint postseason hope the Dolphins (6-9) still harbored.

"It's hard to win football games only kicking field goals," Dolphins quarterback Jay Cutler said. "A couple fumbles, couple of missed opportunities here, a penalty when we're driving - it's those types of things that'll hurt you."

Cutler threw for 286 yards and a touchdown, but a big chunk of that came on a 65-yard toss to Jakeem Grant late in the first half. Otherwise, Miami went 0 for 8 on third down and struggled against a Chiefs defense that has been stingy and opportunistic the past two weeks.

That's coincided with the return of Marcus Peters from his disciplinary suspension.

The Chiefs' star cornerback had two interceptions and forced a fumble against the Chargers last week, a win that pushed them to the brink of the playoffs. He recovered a fumble and forced another on Sunday, giving Peters a hand in five turnovers the past two weeks.

"He's always around the ball," said Chiefs linebacker Derrick Johnson, who forced the first fumble. "Marcus is always playing with fire, this whole year."

Both turnovers led to points, but they weren't the Dolphins' only costly miscues.

They also were nailed for defensive holding four times, all of which came on three scoring drives for Kansas City. And the Dolphins inability to get off the field on third down, after holding opponents to 8 for 39 the past two games, was similarly deflating.

"Got in a couple situations that we couldn't use some of the things that we had planned," Miami coach Adam Gase said. "We just need to find a way to be consistent and get them off the field."

Still, the Dolphins had the ball trailing 17-13 late in the first half, the outcome and their longshot playoff hopes were still in the balance. But they soon went three-and-out and the Chiefs added a field goal to make it 20-13 at the break, then another to start the second half.

Even when the Dolphins made a crucial stop on fourth down to get the ball back later in the third quarter, they squandered the opportunity. Peters stripped Kenny Stills to give the Chiefs the ball, and Butker hit his fourth chip-shot field goal for a 26-13 lead with 12:19 to go.

That gave a sparse crowd that turned out on Christmas Eve, braving slick roads from an overnight snowfall and frigid wind chills at kickoff, plenty of time to celebrate a division title.

Turn their thoughts toward a home playoff game in the new year, too.

"It's a great feeling," Hunt said. "We've got these fans that are going to go crazy for the playoff game, and we get to play in Arrowhead Stadium one more time."

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