Philadelphia Flyers

Morning Skate: No place for Gudas’ slash on Perreault

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Morning Skate: No place for Gudas’ slash on Perreault

Here are all the links from around the hockey world, and what I’m reading, while enjoying the new Brown Sugar Cinnamon coffee flavor at Dunkin’ Donuts. It’s not Cookie Dough, but what is after all?

*FOH (Friend of Haggs) and PHT writer James O’Brien has the details on Radko Gudas getting ejected for an ugly, reckless and dangerous slash to Mathieu Perreault’s head last night. Gudas should be facing a long suspension for a play that has no place in the NHL. It’s time for Flyers fans to stop making excuses for a player who’s no better than a cheap-shot artist and hatchet man. He has to face the music for consistently trying to hurt his fellow players.  

*Frank Seravalli has some of the details for a historic GM meeting in Montreal where NHL hockey was born in the first place.

*You always need to link to a service dog being part of the pregame face-off ceremonies. That’s like a rule here at the morning skate?

*Cam Atkinson and the Columbus Blue Jackets have agreed to a seven-year contract extension, according to reports from the Athletic.

*It’s been quite an eventful year for Arizona Coyotes coach Rick Tocchet and some of it has been to the extreme both good and bad just a month into his first year as bench boss.

*For something completely different: Chris Mannix is all-in on the Celtics being the front-runners in the Eastern Conference after their big win over the Golden State Warriors.

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David Krejci drops the gloves with Nolan Patrick in rare preseason fight

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David Krejci drops the gloves with Nolan Patrick in rare preseason fight

If you had guessed which Bruins player might drop the gloves during a preseason game in Philadelphia, veteran playmaking center David Krejci would have been very low on the prospective list. But it was the 31-year-old Krejci that dropped the gloves with Flyers rookie Nolan Patrick in Boston’s 5-1 loss at the Wells Fargo Center, and gave the No. 2 overall pick a “welcome to the NHL” moment of sorts in a one-sided exhibition game. 

Both Krejci and Patrick got some decent licks in for a couple of skilled top-6 players that are paid to light the lamp rather than light each other up with punches. Krejci told reporters in Philly afterward that he was getting fed up with Patrick chirping a little too much on the ice, and perhaps it was also about the frustration level bubbling over just a little in an admittedly meaningless blowout loss.

“You gotta take the preseason games just like the regular season. That’s the best way to get ready. It just kind of happened. It’s a man’s sport. It is what it is,” said Krejci, who also scored Boston’s only goal in the preseason defeat. “I don’t want to speak for him, but I felt like he was little over the line [with his talking]. He was willing to go too. It wasn’t like I dropped and he was surprised. 

“He was expecting that. So I kind of got to give him respect for that. [He’s in his] first year in the league so good for him. But at the same time, I thought he crossed the line a little bit. We fought and now it’s over with.”

The most important thing from a Bruins perspective is that Krejci came out of the incident unscathed and ready for Saturday night’s preseason finale in Chicago, followed by a healthy start to an important regular season for both the player and his hockey club. 

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Gabrielle learning his NHL lessons, just like his idol Marchand

Gabrielle learning his NHL lessons, just like his idol Marchand

BOSTON – Jesse Gabrielle has drawn comparisons to Brad Marchand since the very day that the Bruins drafted him two years ago. On Thursday night, everybody got to see a few reasons behind those sentiments.

Gabrielle spent the first 50 minutes of the 2-1 overtime Bruins win aggravating, agitating and poking at the Flyers while coupling with Riley Nash and Noel Acciari to provide stout defense and even getting in a couple of generated odd-man rushes that unfortunately didn’t lead to actual goals. 

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The 20-year-old lost control in the final few minutes of the third period, however, in another homage to the early days of Marchand, and got booted from the victory over the Flyers with a 10-minute misconduct for grabbing an opponent’s stick while he was already on the bench.

Bruce Cassidy was understandably unimpressed with the actions that led to the misconduct penalty and two-minute minor for interference, but it’s also part of the Gabrielle learning where the line is for a trouble-maker in the NHL.

“I had guys coming up to me all game. It was a lot of fun. Another guy was on the ice and his stick came across the bench and he gave me a little stick tap. Instinctively, I grabbed for a second,” said Gabrielle. “Granted it should be a nothing play, but I got caught and it is what it is. Boys got the win and it’s not going to happen again.

“I just tried to explain that the guy stuck me first [with his stick] and I got caught and it’s not going to happen again. That’s something that can’t happen. I can’t let the boys down like that, especially when it’s a tie game. It’s just stuff you learn from and move past and learn from it.”

Prior to that incident, it had been a solid showing from Gabrielle in a game featuring many NHL players on both rosters. He set the tone early with a punishing hit on Travis Konecny that earned him his first interference penalty and he caught the attention of noted heavy hitter Radko Gudas as the two chirped back and forth throughout the contest.

It would have been an ideal start if he finished off a great 2-on-1 chance he enjoyed in the third period prior to the misconduct, but then came the misconduct and the words of support from his teammates afterward. Marchand gave him a pat on the back, having been in that position many times in the past, and that meant the world to a player that models his game after the Little Ball of Hate.

“I try to learn from [Marchand]. He’s my favorite player and I try to emulate my game after him. I just try to be a sponge around him. [It’s good] when you can watch him play and experience it and have him on the bench,” said Gabrielle. “Like I said, I’m just trying to be a sponge and learn from him. I went up to him after the game and talked to him about it and said you just got to find that line. He said you’re going to get caught sometimes, and you just got to learn from it.”

Marchand certainly enjoys having a mini-me around in Gabrielle and perhaps finally having a rabble-rousing troublemaker in the lineup that can take the pressure off him to push opponent’s buttons.  

“He’s a great kid. You know, you watch him out there tonight, getting everyone off their game out there. It was a lot of fun to watch, and, you know, it’s nice to have guys like that on a team,” said Marchand. “It’s fun when they’re on the team and, you know, you hate on the other team. I think they were just trying to control the game and make sure nothing bad happened out there. There were a lot of guys out there that were pretty mad at him.

“He didn’t do anything wrong. He’s a good player. He’s good at what he does. He reminds me a lot of myself when he’s out there. I just laugh at him. He’s a pretty funny kid. He’s fun to have on the team and he makes it exciting to watch. You tend to watch him when he’s out there on the ice.”

Now, just like Marchand, Gabrielle has to learn the rules of engagement at the pro hockey level as he makes the transition from junior hockey. His chances of making the NHL as a dark-horse candidate might have taken a hit with his mistake late in the third period of a tight game, but Gabrielle is showing that it might not be too long before his energy and brand of on-ice mischief will be welcomed in the NHL.