White Sox

5 Questions with... WIND AM 560's Amy Jacobson

192397.jpg

5 Questions with... WIND AM 560's Amy Jacobson

Wednesday, June 16, 2010
By Jeff Nuich
CSN Chicago Senior Director of CommunicationsCSNChicago.com Contributor

Want to know more about your favorite Chicago media celebrities? CSNChicago.com has your fix as we put the citys most popular personalities on the spot with everyones favorite weekly local celeb feature entitled 5 Questions with...

Every Wednesday, exclusively on CSNChicago.com, its our turn to grill the local media and other local VIPs with five random sports and non-sports related questions that will definitely be of interest to old and new fans alike.

This weeks guest one of the most popular Chicago media personalities over the past several years her aggressive journalistic style has earned her multiple ChicagoMidwest Emmys in her career, plus -- shes never been afraid to let her political opinions be known she can be heard weekdays with co-host Big John Howell Monday-Friday from 5-9 a.m. on AM 560 WIND here are 5 Questions withAMY JACOBSON!

BIO: Amy Jacobson is a veteran Chicago broadcasternews journalist who, since this past March, is the popular morning co-host on AM 560 WIND. Previously, she was a general assignment reporter for 11 years at NBC 5 in Chicago (1996-2007). Her career was marred in controversy in the summer of 2007 as she was part of a scandal involving a rival Chicago TV station's news cameras capturing footage of Jacobson with her children at the home of the husband of a missing woman. The story received national attention with Jacobson making numerous TVradio appearances, including four appearances on NBCs Today Show. Following her tenure at NBC 5, Jacobson worked as a traffic and news reporter at WLS AM 890 from 2008-10. Her long career saw Jacobson working her way up in the TV industry with reporting positions in Detroit; El Paso; Tucson; Alexandria, Minn.; and Cedar Rapids. A native of Mt. Prospect, Jacobson graduated from John Hersey High School in 1987 and graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Iowa with a bachelors degree in broadcasting and film in 1991.

1) CSNChicago.com: Amy, youre a proud Republican in a city predominantly filled with citizens who would categorize themselves as Democrats. What challenges does that present to you and your AM 560 WIND morning show co-host Big John Howell on a daily basis as you continue your goal of gaining listenership for your show?

Jacobson: Our audience consists of conservatives and liberals, and while I consider myself a Republican, more than ever, most issues aren't as cut and dried as right versus left, Democrat versus Republican. John and I often find ourselves on different sides of issues, which means that we butt heads every day, but it's never predictable. But we know the audience is growing because we welcome all opinions and viewpoints. I hear it in the phone calls we get each every day from listeners who refuse to be put in a partisan box.

2) CSNChicago.com: The recent news of the Highland Park High School girls basketball teams trip to Arizona being canceled for political reasons has spurred much controversy to say the least. Its been such a big story that former Republican vice presidential candidate Gov. Sarah Palin reached out to you to help her raise moneyawareness and simply find a way to get these girls to Arizona. Whats the latest on this situation and how did you feel when Palin contacted you personally for help?

Jacobson: AM 560 WIND sponsored "An Evening with Sarah Palin" at the Rosemont Theatre. Big John and I introduced Gov. Palin and moderated a question-and-answer session with her. While in the green room, she asked me about the situation in Highland Park, which was just coming to public light. I told her that, as a former basketball player and someone who once lived in Arizona, I was outraged and that I thought it was a disgrace how female athletes were being used as political pawns. We began talking about our mutual love of basketball, the friendships that we both forged, and how we learned the important lessons of life on the basketball court.

We bonded instantly. Then, as she was leaving, she looked at me and said, "Amy, let's make this happen. I want to work together with you and raise awareness and raise funds for those girls to travel to Arizona." The next day we exchanged e-mails and set up a Facebook page. We also had a savvy businessman from Tucson all set to pay for the ENTIRE trip. Then, as the school board members met to render a decision, I was warned by a parent that it wasn't "safe" for me to go to the meeting and that many parents didn't like me or Gov. Palin. I immediately e-mailed Gov. Palin and she told me not to back down and go to the meeting. I did.

However, much to our dismay, the Board would not budge. They already planned a trip to Florida. But if the school board changes their mind, we still have that business man in Tucson waiting to help. You betcha!

3) CSNChicago.com: Being a Chicago-area native and a longtime sports fan, what single moment during this Stanley Cup championship Blackhawks season will you remember for the rest of your life?

Jacobson: The most memorable moment for me was when Duncan Keith got seven teeth knocked out by a puck and returned later in the game! It symbolized the "never say die" spirit of the Hawks that helped bring the Cup back to Chicago for the first time in nearly half a century.

4) CSNChicago.com: Youve overcome plenty of professional and personal challenges in recent years, most of which were unfortunately made public. How are you doing today and, in regards to what occurred during that dark period, did it strengthen you or do you still go through some tough moments dealing with all of it to this day?

Jacobson: I have stated my thoughts in the past about what was done to me and the impact that it had on my career and my family. I grew up in a blue collar town, Mt. Prospect, and I felt I could always relate to anyone whether they lived in a mansion or in a cardboard box like some did while I was a reporter near Ciudad Juarez. I had passion, which is something you can NOT teach an intern. What was done cost me everything that I had spent my entire my life building. At the end of the day, I was fortunate to have the love and support of my family and friends. Without that and my faith in God, I wouldn't have survived.

These days, I prefer to focus my energy on moving forward with my life, my career, and on raising my two young sons. And the outpouring of public support that I continue to receive to this day helps make that task somewhat easier. At least once a week, someone will come up and say to me, "Amy, you got screwed."

The lowest moments came when I was without a home, husband and my unemployment support ended. Then even worse news came. My 5-year-old son had to have his kidney removed at Children's Memorial Hospital. I got on my knees and had a long talk with God. I was never cocky or took a day for granted while being a reporter. But that day was poignant because I gave my heart, which was full of anger, over to God. When the operation was a success and tears of joy ran down my face, an inner voice said, "Amy, it's going to be okay. You will survive." Your family's health is everything!

5) CSNChicago.com: On to a more fun topic... your annual presence at Chicagos News-a-Palooza, featuring many of our citys top media personalities singing and performing live on stage to help raise money for a great cause (Cystic Fibrosis Foundation), always seems to be a big hit. In fact, youre stellar performance of Stevie Nicks mega-hit Stand Back was beyond impressive... and even has over 10,000 hits on YouTube (click here to see Amys performance). Where did you learn how to sing so well and what songs are you working on for this years event?

Jacobson: I learned to sing in music class at Indian Grove Elementary School. Mrs. Vanderwheel was my music teacher and she had a passion and an ability to teach like no other. Fortunately, she moved with us to River Trails Junior High where I joined the choir.

At John Hersey High School, I was blessed with another wonderful instructor, Richard Turasky. He was in charge of choir and show choir. He taught us all to stand up straight, project and sing through your eyes. It helped as I became a reporter to always be confident. You can't be shy and be an assertive reporter. You can't be quiet and do talk radio! I also was in two rock bands during my college years. I'm glad no one has video of that.

As for News-a-Palooza, I enjoyed my two years participating in the event. Working with Roe Conn and Richard Marx to raise money and awareness for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation meant the world to me. Marion Brooks, Ginger Zee, Natalie Martinez and I teamed up last year and we got our groove on. If anything else, it was at least entertaining or maybe just campy. Almost ONE MILLION people viewed the "Single Ladies Video," which you can still see if you go to roeconn.com.

I do not know if an event is scheduled for this year but if asked to do so, I would help out in anyway possible.

BONUS QUESTION... CSNChicago.com: Anything you want to promote Amy? Please share it with us...

Jacobson: This Saturday, I will be on "247" on NBC 5. I helped out for a "Sex and the City" segment with reporter Kati Kehoe (yes, another campy segment). But we had a fun time at the photo shoot and watching the movie. Kati Kehoe is hysterically brilliant. It will air at midnight Saturday night.

As for charities, I would love for people to donate to "Bear Necessities." It is a pediatric cancer foundation run out of Children's Memorial Hospital. They are dedicated to eliminating pediatric cancer and to providing hope and support to those who are touched by it. They can be reached through their website.

I am also a board member on Allie and Friends. Chicago native and Indianapolis Colts player Ryan Diem is in charge of the event which benefits children and their families effected by Neuroblastoma. For more information on that, please visit their website.

Jacobson LINKS:

Official Amy Jacobson website

WIND AM 560 Big John & Amy home page
Amy Jacobson on Facebook

Amy Jacobson on Twitter

Potential first-ballot guy and Blackout Game hero Jim Thome headlines group of former White Sox on this year's Hall of Fame ballot

1120_jim_thome.jpg
AP

Potential first-ballot guy and Blackout Game hero Jim Thome headlines group of former White Sox on this year's Hall of Fame ballot

White Sox fans have seen a couple of their team's all-time greats go into the Hall of Fame in recent years, with Frank Thomas inducted in 2014 and Tim Raines inducted earlier this year.

Seven former White Sox are on this year's Hall of Fame ballot, even if only a couple of them made a big impact on the South Side.

Jim Thome is on the ballot for the first time. While more famously a member of those great Cleveland Indians teams of the 1990s, Thome spent four seasons in a White Sox uniform, playing in 529 games and belting 134 of his 612 career home runs with the South Siders.

A Peoria native currently working as a member of the organization, Thome was a beloved part of four White Sox teams, including the last one to reach the postseason in 2008. He smacked a solo homer to drive in the lone run in the legendary Blackout Game, a 1-0 win over the Minnesota Twins that gave the White Sox the American League Central crown in the 163rd game of the 2008 regular season.

Thome ranks second in White Sox history in slugging percentage and OPS, trailing only Thomas in both categories. He's No. 7 on the franchise leaderboard in on-base percentage and No. 13 on the home run list.

Given that he ranks eighth on baseball's all-time home run list, Thome could very well be a first-ballot Hall of Famer.

Also on this year's ballot is Carlos Lee, a power-hitting outfielder who spent the first six seasons of his major league career with the White Sox. El Caballo hit 152 homers and drove in 552 runs in 880 games with the White Sox, finishing 18th in AL MVP voting in 2003 after he slashed .291/.331/.499 with 31 homers. His numbers were even better in 2004, his final season with the White Sox.

Lee ranks ninth on the team's all-time home run list and 11th on the franchise leaderboard in slugging percentage.

Lee did an awful lot of damage in six seasons with the Houston Astros, as well, and earned three All-Star nods in his post-Sox career.

Five others to play for the White Sox are on this year's ballot. Sammy Sosa, more noteworthy for what he did with the Cubs, spent parts of three seasons on the South Side. Omar Vizquel, another Indians great like Thome, played for the White Sox in 2010 and 2011. Andruw Jones, better known for his defensive highlights with the Atlanta Braves, played 107 games with the White Sox in 2010. Orlando Hudson played in 51 games for the White Sox in 2012. And Manny Ramirez, the legendary Indians and Red Sox slugger, played 24 games with the White Sox in 2010.

In order to qualify for election into the Hall of Fame, a player must appear on 75 of ballots submitted by voters.

After critical missed field goal, Bears waive Connor Barth and sign former Chiefs kicker Cairo Santos

1120_cairo_santos.jpg
USA TODAY

After critical missed field goal, Bears waive Connor Barth and sign former Chiefs kicker Cairo Santos

After Connor Barth's critical missed field-goal try in Sunday's loss to the Detroit Lions, the Bears moved on to a new option at kicker.

The team announced Monday afternoon that it waived Barth and signed former Kansas City Chiefs kicker Cairo Santos.

Santos, a Tulane product who the Bears met with just last week, spent parts of the past four seasons with the Chiefs, including three games earlier this season. Santos has made 89 of his 105 field-goal attempts in his career and 125 of his 130 extra-point tries.

Santos was waived by the Chiefs earlier this season after being placed on injured reserve with a groin injury. He was a perfect 3-for-3 on field goals and a perfect 6-for-6 on extra points in the three games he played with the Chiefs earlier this season.

Barth's accuracy was a problem throughout his season and a half with the Bears, but perhaps no miss was bigger than what happened Sunday. After Mitch Trubisky drove the Bears into position for a game-tying field goal, Barth's 46-yard attempt with eight seconds left was far right, and the Bears lost the game 27-24.

In two seasons with the Bears, Barth missed 10 field-goal tries in 26 games. He was 11-for-16 so far in 2017 after going 18-for-23 in 2016.