Preps Talk

Baseball's first 10-game winners are ... who???

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Baseball's first 10-game winners are ... who???

From Comcast SportsNet
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) -- R.A. Dickey nearly gave the New York Mets their second no-hitter in two weeks. Now that would have been something -- especially considering it took them more than 50 years to pitch their first one. Dickey allowed only an infield single during his second career one-hitter and broke the franchise record for consecutive scoreless innings in a 9-1 victory over the Tampa Bay Rays on Wednesday night. The knuckleballer became the first 10-game winner in the majors, set a career best with 12 strikeouts and did not walk a batter. The only hit the Rays managed came when speedy B.J. Upton hit a high bouncer in the first inning that third baseman David Wright was unable to field with his bare hand. Mets manager Terry Collins said the team would appeal the official scorer's ruling on Upton's hit to the commissioner's office, but conceded it probably wouldn't change the result. "We said in the ninth inning that we've got to appeal that play. We're probably not going to win it, but ... what the heck," Collins said. "What have you got to lose except to have somebody say no?" Johan Santana held St. Louis hitless on June 1, the first no-hitter in the Mets' 51-year history. Dickey was just as dominant Wednesday -- if not more so. " If anybody deserved a no-hitter or a perfect game tonight, it was him," Collins said. Dickey (10-1) ran his career-best shutout streak to 32 2-3 innings before yielding an unearned run in the ninth. That topped the previous club mark of 31 2-3 scoreless innings in a row set by Jerry Koosman in 1973. "I always try to be consistent. That means a lot to me, to be consistent and trustworthy. And it makes me feel good that my team feels like they've got a chance to win every time out," said Dickey, who also pitched a one-hitter against Philadelphia at Citi Field on Aug. 13, 2010. "The streaks and the special things that happen along the way are just the manifestation of that, of wanting to be consistent and wanting to really be good at my craft. I still have a passion for it. I'm still looking for things to do with the knuckleball." After Upton's hit, the 37-year-old knuckleballer permitted only one other baserunner, on a throwing error by Wright in the ninth. "We're two plays from a perfect game," Collins said. "I've seen a lot of things. I've not seen a perfecto. Today I saw as close to that as I've ever been around in my 42 years. It's amazing, just truly amazing what he's done. To think two years ago this guy was the first guy cut from this club to where he's at today, I absolutely salute the guy." Dickey outpitched AL wins leader David Price (8-4). In his last five outings, the right-hander has struck out 50 and walked three. He is 8-0 in his past 10 starts. "He's at a different level right now. It's amazing what he's been able to do," Wright said. "It just seems like each outing he's getting better and better. It's fun to be a part of." Besides the good fortune for Upton, Tampa Bay didn't come close to getting another hit. In fact, the Rays only managed to hit five balls out of the infield all night -- three routine fly balls to center field and one each to left and right. "Did you notice he was tipping all of his pitches?" Rays manager Joe Maddon joked. "Did you happen to pick up on that? "We were just the latest victim. He's done that to a lot of teams more recently," Maddon added. "He's really good right now. He has this uncanny ability to throw it around the strike zone for strikes. He's a different cat. He's got a hot knuckleball." Wright said he might have tried to use his glove to make the play on Upton's grounder in the first if a slower runner had been trying to beat out the hit. The third baseman said he didn't know if he should have been charged with an error. "I tried to make the play. I didn't make it. It's as simple as that," Wright said. "I don't think I could have got him with the glove. I tried to barehand it. It hit the lip and skipped on me, and I didn't make the play. If they want to go back and give me an error, they can do that." Dickey, whose eight straight wins also are a career best, lost his shutout in the ninth. Elliot Johnson reached on Wright's throwing error, then advanced to third on a pair of passed balls by Mike Nickeas before scoring when Desmond Jennings grounded out. "Mike is really upset about it, but he did a great job. It's not easy to catch him," Collins said. "He was apologizing profusely at the end of the game," Dickey said. "It's hard back there, especially when it was moving like it was tonight. ... He had done a great job all night. It's just that last inning that kind of got away from him a little bit, but he worked his tail off." Daniel Murphy and Omar Quintanilla drove in two runs apiece for the Mets. Nickeas ended an 0-for-14 drought with an RBI single, and Vinny Rottino and Ike Davis also drove in runs for New York, which has rebounded from being swept by the Yankees in a weekend series to win two straight from Tampa Bay by a combined score of 20-3. Wright capped a 14-hit outburst with a two-run double in the ninth. Price, who is tied for the AL wins lead, allowed a season-high seven runs on nine hits in five-plus innings. He walked three and struck out eight. According to STATS LLC, the starting pitching matchup was only the second since 1921 to feature the AL and NL wins leaders during the regular season. The other was Boston's Josh Beckett and San Diego's Jake Peavy on June 24, 2007. The Rays said it has only happened three times in the last 50 World Series, with Atlanta's John Smoltz facing the Yankees' Andy Pettitte in 1996, Toronto's Jack Morris facing Atlanta's Tom Glavine in 1992 and the Dodgers' Sandy Koufax going against the Yankees' Whitey Ford twice in 1963. NOTES: Collins was selected to serve as one of the NL coaches for the All-Star game. ... Tampa Bay's Ben Zobrist was out of the lineup for the second straight night. The second baseman has a sore right hand that was injured while sliding into second base at Miami on Sunday, but Maddon said Zobrist did not play Tuesday night because he was ill. ... Rays DH Luke Scott, who has not started the last seven games, is day to day with a stiff back. ... Mets LF Jason Bay went 1 for 5 and is 1 for 21 since returning from a long stint on the disabled list with a broken rib.

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ST. LOUIS (AP) -- The game plan called for Lance Lynn to spend his first full season in the St. Louis Cardinals' bullpen. Instead, the young right-hander has emerged as one of the game's best pitchers of any age. The 25-year-old Lynn struck out a career-high 12 despite back tightness to stay tied for the major league lead in wins, and Carlos Beltran hit his NL-best 19th home run Wednesday night to send the St. Louis Cardinals to a 1-0 victory over the White Sox that ended Chicago's eight-game road winning streak. "Every time I go out there I think like it's 0-0, whatever inning it is and whoever's up. You don't want to give up a hit ever, or a run ever," Lynn said after outdueling Jake Peavy. "I was able to keep them off the board." Paul Konerko grounded into a game-ending double play with runners on first and third against Jason Motte. "I knew they had it," Lynn said. "It was a little interesting, but it was fun." Motte pounded Konerko inside before the cleanup man hit a bouncer to third. "If he's hitting his spots it's tough to put a good swing on it," Konerko said. "A little deceptiveness, but more than anything he was just hitting spots." Beltran homered in the third inning off Peavy (6-2) and had three of the four hits for the Cardinals, who have scored only seven runs in the last five games and totaled a single run for the third straight game. They've won just five of 14. Cardinals manager Mike Matheny said he almost scratched Beltran, who has been bothered by stomach issues, before the game. "Mike wanted to take me out of the lineup and I said yesterday I played like that, and I was fine," Beltran said. "Today was good." Lynn (10-2) allowed three hits in 7 1-3 innings and joined Mets knuckleballer R.A. Dickey as the only 10-game winners in the majors. Dickey threw a one-hitter at Tampa Bay earlier in the night. Lynn replaced injured Chris Carpenter in the rotation. He topped his previous career best of 11 strikeouts while going six innings during his last start at Houston. Beltran has been a force batting second, hitting 11 homers from that spot in 20 starts compared with seven long balls at cleanup in 32 games. All but five of his homers have come batting left-handed, and 11 have come with the bases empty. Peavy worked seven innings and gave up four hits with six strikeouts and two walks in the hard-luck loss, retiring 13 of his last 14 hitters. He had entered an American League-best 3-0 with a 1.75 ERA on the road and had won six in a row away from home with a 1.44 ERA overall dating to Aug. 7, 2011. Like Lynn, who said his back has been bothering him for about a week, Peavy came into the game at less than full strength. Peavy said he's been ill the last few days. "I had some kind of concoction that got me through the night," Peavy said. "I had to throttle back and maybe that helped me a little bit mechanically. "They were aggressive and they were swinging and we got some quick outs. It just wasn't meant to be tonight." Marc Rzepczynski got pinch-hitter Adam Dunn to ground sharply into a double play to end the eighth and Motte finished for his 12th save in 15 chances. Matheny went right back to Rzepczynski, a night after Dunn homered in the eighth inning to help the White Sox pull away for a 6-1 victory. "That's good, I wanted to face him," Rzepczynski said. "It's one of those things, when a guy gets you, you want to go out there and face him the next day and have a chance to get him out." Dunn, a pregame lineup scratch due to a slightly sprained ankle, has grounded into just two double plays. Dunn said he injured his ankle homering off Rzepczynski. Matheny gave Lynn a vote of confidence when he let him bat with two outs and none on in the seventh. Lynn struck out Alexei Ramirez for the third time to open the eighth, then was lifted after Orlando Hudson singled up the middle. Lynn's strongest save came in the fifth when Alex Rios was stranded at third after a leadoff triple. Lynn struck out three of the next four, fanning Peavy after a two-out intentional walk to Hudson. The Cardinals had just three at-bats with runners in scoring position against Peavy, whose biggest out was striking out David Freese after consecutive two-out walks to Matt Holliday and Allen Craig in the third. NOTES: St. Louis' Matt Carpenter (right side) will begin a rehab assignment with Triple-A Memphis on Thursday and could join the team next week. Carpenter has started at 1B, 3B and RF and said "for me, it's not like it's going to take a week of at-bats." ... Cardinals 2B-OF Skip Schumaker (strained right hamstring) began a rehab assignment with Memphis and could return from the disabled list on time. ... Peavy has allowed seven homers in his last eight starts after giving up just one in his first five outings. ... Peavy has been getting an average of 6.1 runs of support per nine innings. ... Alejandro De Aza had two hits and is 11 for 27 (.407) during a six-game hitting streak.

IHSA Football Playoff Pairings Show Roundup

IHSA Football Playoff Pairings Show Roundup

CLASS 1A

Revealing the Class 1A Bracket

Analyzing the Class 1A Bracket

CLASS 2A

Revealing the Class 2A Bracket

Analyzing the Class 2A Bracket

CLASS 3A

Revealing the Class 3A Bracket

Analyzing the Class 3A Bracket

CLASS 4A

Revealing the Class 4A Bracket

Analyzing the Class 4A Bracket

Predicting Class 1A-4A

CLASS 5A

Revealing the Class 5A Bracket

Analyzing the Class 5A Bracket

CLASS 6A

Revealing the Class 6A Bracket

Analyzing the Class 6A Bracket

CLASS 7A

Revealing the Class 7A Bracket

Analyzing the Class 7A Bracket

CLASS 8A

Revealing the Class 8A Bracket

Analyzing the Class 8A Bracket

Class 7A and Class 8A Predictions

 

In ugly home opener, Lauri Markkanen gives a glimmer of hope

In ugly home opener, Lauri Markkanen gives a glimmer of hope

Keeping the game simple is often a tough task for rookies entering the NBA, but it seems Lauri Markkanen has been a quick learner in that aspect.

Through two games he’s probably the lone bright spot, especially after the Bulls’ cringe-inducing 87-77 loss to the San Antonio Spurs in their home opener at the United Center.

Jumper not falling? Okay, go to the basket.

“It wasn’t falling so I tried to get to the rim a couple times,” Markkanen said. “At the end, I was like let’s do it and I connected on a 3-pointer, I felt more open just because I was at the rim. I think that helped.”

He was asked what the difference was in the second game of his career compared to the first.

“I mean the crowd was chanting for us (tonight),” Markkanen said, referring to Thursday in Toronto.

He wasn’t attempting to display any dry wit but applying common sense seems to work for him, even though he’s been thrust into a situation after an incident that doesn’t make any sense.

With Bobby Portis and Nikola Mirotic out for the foreseeable future, playing a game-high 37 minutes will be more common than anomaly.

“Whatever your minutes are, you gotta play them to the best of your ability,” Bulls coach Fred Hoiberg said. “He’s being allowed to play through some mistakes right now. He’s gonna play heavy minutes every night.”

He only shot five of 14 but achieved his first double-double with 13 points and 12 rebounds after a 17-point, eight-rebound debut against the Raptors Thursday.

No, someone didn’t open a door for a draft to come into the United Center on that three-pointer that went wide left, but it didn’t stop him from being assertive and continuing to look for his shot.

There was plenty of muck, easy to see on the stat sheet. The 38 percent shooting overall, the lack of penetration, the 29 percent shooting from 3-point range and 20 turnovers.

It’s not hard to imagine what Markkanen will look like with competent and effective NBA players around him, along with a true facilitating point guard that will find him in this offense.

“Markkanen is a wonderful player,” Spurs coach Gregg Popovich said. “He’s aggressive, he’s smart and obviously, he can shoot the ball. He’s just going to get better and better as he figures things out.”

He received a crash course, facing the likes of Pau Gasol, LaMarcus Aldridge and Rudy Gay Saturday night. On one instance, Gay drove baseline and made Markkanen buckle with a 3-point play.

Aldridge had 24 shots in 32 minutes as a new focal point with Kawhi Leonard out with injury.

So he’s not getting treated with kid gloves, nor is he backing down from the assignments.

“He didn’t shoot the ball well but he battled,” Hoiberg said. “He had a tough assignment with Pau, who’s gonna be in the Hall of Fame one day. Good experience. He guarded Aldridge, Rudy Gay some. He battled, he fought them.”

Even with the airball, had the moment that gives the Bulls fans hope, when he drove on Gasol, spun and hooked a lefty layup while being fouled by the veteran in the first half—giving the United Center faithful something to have faith in for a moment.

“Sometimes you get labeled as a shooter. That’s the label Lauri had,” Hoiberg said. “But he really is a complete basketball player. He’s versatile, he can put in on the deck. He slides his feet very well for a guy that’s seven feet tall, someone his age. Yeah, he’s learning on the fly. He’s gonna have ups and downs, as young as he is. He’s gonna have some struggles at times. But he’s played pretty darn well for everything he’s been through, understanding two days ago he’s gonna be in the starting lineup.”

And for all the bad air around the Bulls right now, from the on-court product to the off-court drama that seems to follow them around like Pigpen, it would be even worse if Markkanen’s first two games had him looking like a corpse, or someone who would be a couple years away from reasonably contributing to an NBA team.

“He’s good, he’s very good,” Gasol said. “I like him. I like his game.”